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Dining in Las Vegas: Part 1

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Restaurants visited last week:

Marché Bacchus: This restaurant is about 10 miles off the strip. It has a unique concept which I like very much. It is a retail store and restaurant. You walk into the retail store. Restaurant is out back. They have indoor and outdoor dining. The outdoor dining is quite enjoyable. There is a small lake there so nice views of ducks and swans. The concept of the venue is that you pick out whatever wine(s) you want to drink in the retail store and then bring the wine into the restaurant and they will open and serve it for $10 corkage. Wines are reasonably priced and there are some gems at not outrageous prices. For example ’95 Margaux was $350. We had just flown in so we did not want to go too crazy and thus we picked an ’04 Vieux Telegrahe for $50. Owners are French as is the food. I had escargots and cassoulet. Food = B+. Wine List = A+. Ambience = A. Service = A+.

Spago: We had an early dinner here before going to see Elton John. This place is always reliable and food is always very good to great. The sweet corn agnolotti with parm reg was especially wonderful. No bargains on the wine list which has mostly current vintages. Food = A+. Wine List = B. Ambience = A. Service = A.

B & B: This is the new Mario Batali place which is copied from Babbo. Food was very good in a similar vein as Babbo. The restaurant itself has only been open 3 or 4 weeks and it showed in the service. Food arrived before the wine. It took them forever to fillet a Branzino. Waiter was obnoxious and rude. Wine list has an excellent selection of Italian wines with many from Piedmonte. There are a few value plays and only other issue is that the Barolos are much too young. Food = A. Wine List = B+. Ambience = B. Service = D.

Pinot Brasserie: This restaurant is located in the Venetian. I believe it was connected with Pinot Blanc in Napa. Not sure what the deal is now that Pinot Blanc has closed. The food here is very good but not great. It is food prepared in a more simple style than in many of the over the top Vegas restaurants. We did share some delicious mussels and my heritage pork chop was terrific. The attraction here is that you can bring in your own wine for no corkage! Food = B+. Wine List = NA. Ambience = B+. Service = A.

Mesa Grill: If you like Bobby Flay’s style of southwestern cuisine you will like Mesa Grill. Only complaint is the location near the Caesar’s Palace Sports Book. I loved my appetizer of blue corn pancake with barbequed duck in a habanero chile – star anise sauce. Entrée of spice rubbed pork tenderloin with bourbon-ancho chile sauce was delicious as was a cornmeal crusted chile relleno stuffed with white cheddar, black beans and rice. Wine list is OK. California is probably where to concentrate. Again no great value but then again none expected in Vegas restaurants. Food = A. Wine List = B. Ambience = B. Service = A.

I also did 2 lunches at Lotus of Siam. I won’t go through the usual litany. Just be assured it was as good as ever!! The place does get packed early. I got there at 11:30 and there was already quite a crowd both days. By noon, there was a line to get seated. Do NOT do the lunch buffet as it is pedestrian. Order off the main menu!


Edited by paul jaouen (log)

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I'm off to Vegas next month for my foruth trip in as many years. Time again to start thinking about food. I've already started a thread about LUNCHES in Las Vegas, but this post is to work on some dinner ideas.

I'll be there four nights. Saturday, Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday. Monday dinner is already "set". I'll most likely be going to Fix with a large group of people. So, I've got three slots open. One place I want to try is Daniel Boloud Brasserie at the Wynn. That's a defnite. That leaves two open dinner slots. Here are some of the places I am thiking of

Delmonico Steak House (Emeril is OK by me. I had a very nice meal at the chef's table at Emeril's Fish House two years ago)

Bouchon (went there for lunch and breakfast last year. Would like to try dinner, but maybe Bouchon + Boluoud in the same week is too much of the same?

L'Atelier (went there last year, too. It was great. I get the impression that the discovery menu could be totally diffferent than what I had last year, which would be good)

Guy Savoy (this trip doesn't have as many of the hard core foodies willing to drop a pile of cash on a meal as previous trips, so I'm not sure if I could find other people to convince or twist my arm some to go. Still, it's an option. I like the idea of the "express" menu served in a non-express way)

Obviously, that's more than enough places to fill my limited slots. But I'd like to hear other suggestions. I see a lot of talk about Alex and Wing Lei. Give me some more.


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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I'm off to Vegas next month for my foruth trip in as many years. Time again to start thinking about food.  I've already started a thread about LUNCHES in Las Vegas, but this post is to work on some dinner ideas.

I'll be there four nights. Saturday, Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday.  Monday dinner is already "set". I'll most likely be going to Fix with a large group of people.  So, I've got three slots open. One place I want to try is Daniel Boloud Brasserie at the Wynn.  That's a defnite.  That leaves two open dinner slots.  Here are some of the places I am thiking of

Delmonico Steak House (Emeril is OK by me. I had a very nice meal at the chef's table at Emeril's Fish House two years ago)

Bouchon (went  there for lunch and breakfast last year. Would like to try dinner, but maybe Bouchon + Boluoud in the same week is too much of the same?

L'Atelier  (went there last year, too. It was great. I get the impression that the discovery menu could be totally diffferent than what I had last year, which would be good)

Guy Savoy  (this trip doesn't have as many of the hard core foodies willing to drop a pile of cash on a meal as previous trips, so I'm not sure if I could find other people to convince or twist my arm some to go.  Still, it's an option.  I like the idea of the "express" menu served in a non-express way)

Obviously, that's more than enough places to fill my limited slots.  But I'd like to hear other suggestions.  I see a lot of talk about Alex and Wing Lei.  Give me some more.

I just got back two weeks ago from a week in Las Vegas eating at some of the places you are thinking about going to. I'm working on a full report of my trip, but in the meantime, here are my thoughts:

-I prefer Craftsteak at the MGM over Delmonico. I like the more lively atmosphere at Craftsteak, and the menu offers a few more choices of cuts of meat and preparations.

-I had breakfast at Bouchon and it was wonderful. The service and food are good and consistent. I always ask for a table outside on the patio for breakfast. It's very peaceful in the morning. Their breakfast breads and pastries are especially good. I find that the dinner menu at Bouchon is more relaxed in terms of preparation than the dinner menu at Boulud. I don't think you'd find it overkill to have dinner at both-both offer good quality French food and the menus are different. For example-the mussels at Bouchon may be simply steamed with wine and garlic and presented in a cast iron pot-Boulud might do the same recipe but serve it a bit more fancy in a china bowl. Bouchon is Bistro while Boulud is a more upscale type of Brasserie.

-I had dinner at Wing Lei and the service and food were both fantastic. I saw literally a convoy of carts roll by with whole Peking Ducks, destined to be carved tableside. I had requested in advance that the Chef prepare a tasting menu for me. No special requests, just whatever he wanted to prepare that night. It was seven courses of Chinese culinary heaven. They are gracious and welcoming and will describe the ingredients of each dish and how each element was prepared.

-I went to a private winemaker's lunch at Alex. Chef Alex Stratta was in the kitchen and came into the dining room to introduce himself. He is a very convivial chap and graciously signed my menu. The service staff was extremely accomodating and friendly. The quality of the food, elegant decor of the dining room and welcoming service of the staff at lunch demonstrated to me that Alex would in fact produce the same results at dinner. If Spring Vegetables with Truffle Vinaigrette, Santa Barbara Spot Prawns with Corn Custard, Quail stuffed with Foie Gras and Truffles, Asparagus Gratin and a Trio of Chocolates sounds to your liking, those are examples of dishes you'll taste at Alex.

-The highlight of my trip was a private dinner at Guy Savoy. Mind you, this was a private dinner, so our menu and the wines were specially selected by Chef Savoy and his staff-we didn't order off the regular menu. Regardless, any dish you taste will be special. Dream of butter, truffles, Foie gras, and intense flavors you have never tasted before. Not only was the food the quality one would expect from one of the world's top French Chefs, the special atmosphere of our evening added to the once in a lifetime experience-it was the one year anniversary of Savoy opening at Caesar's Palace and Chef Savoy was in the kitchen, his son Frank in the front of the house, and the full kitchen staff of 36 was present. The ratio was nearly 1 chef for each guest. Dining at Guy Savoy is a special, special experience. In addition to what you order off the menu, there is a bread cart, a cheese cart, and a dessert cart. The dessert cart was served after the plated desserts. On the night we were there the dessert cart had too many choices to mention here-but I tried lavendar ice cream, strawberry lollipops, blackberry marshmallows and pistachio macaroons. My only caution to you is that if you are going to dinner at Savoy do it right-that means spending upwards of 4 hours of your evening at the table. Going in with the intention of a quick bite doesn't give you the opportunity to really enjoy what this restaurant has to offer. Secondly, the prices are very high-similar to the prices at Joel Robuchon at the MGM. The entrees are upwards of $70-90.00. The tasting menu gives you the greatest opportunity to enjoy the seasonal ingredients that are in the kitchen. The tasting menu is in the range of $350.00 without wines. If you want a memorable dinner in Las Vegas and can afford the cost and time, go to Guy Savoy. Incredible.

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after reading some other threads here, I think Wing Lei has bubbled to the top of the of places I want to add to my list. The Peking Duck tating menu intrigues me. One question, though. My experience with restaurants and tasting menus is that they typically are only done for the whole table. Would that be the case at Wing Lei? Would everyone have to do the peking duck menu, or could 2 or 3 do it, while 1 or 2 go a la carte?

The firming up list....

Fix

Daniel Boulud

Wing Lei

Need one more. :) Not sure if it's gonna be a "blow the budget" place or something "lesser" like a return to L'Atelier.


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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after reading some other threads here, I think  Wing Lei has bubbled to the top of the of places I want to add to my list.  The Peking Duck tating menu intrigues me.    One question, though.  My experience with restaurants and tasting menus is that they typically are only done for the whole table.  Would that be the case at Wing Lei? Would everyone have to do the peking duck menu, or could 2 or 3 do it, while 1 or 2 go a la carte?

The firming up list....

Fix

Daniel Boulud

Wing Lei

Need one more. :)  Not sure if it's gonna be a "blow the budget" place or something "lesser" like a return to L'Atelier.

I dined alone at Wing Lei and they graciously served me a tasting menu. I didn't have the Peking DUck tasting menu, but I'm sure they would have obliged me that indulgence. I went to their Wynn dining reservations site and made the arrangements online. Thanks to the gentleman who accomodated my request via emails. I asked for the tasting menu, although I knew it was usually reserved for a minimum party of two. They didn't hesitate and immediately emailed me back with my request to have the Spring Tasting Menu. I'll post the menu tommorrow.

When I sat down the waiter greeted me by saying "Mr. Ross we have the tasting menu ready to serve you tonight will that be acceptable?" My gosh, have you recently been greeted so warmly at a restaurant? Wonderful food and service ensued.

Your list: Fix-hip, loud younger crowd and trendy (but good) food, Daniel Boulud-relaxed yet elegant crowd, very good French style food, and Wing Lei-the ultimate in Chinese cuisine and service, looks great. Wish I was going along!

There are so many more choices in Las Vegas to add to your list. I haven't been, but based on the reviews, L'Atelier should be a good choice.

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Loved Wing Lei...as I mentioned..the Peking Duck Tasting menu is fantastic...the room lovely, service great. I can't wait to return and ask for a tasting menu. Sorry I don't remember if both me and my husband needed to order the same tasting menu....

Two dinners at Daniel Boulud last year and we're returning in the fall. I think it's sensational.

Don't start throwing rocks at me but I was hugely disappointed in dinner at Bouchon. Very loud...terrible service and out of 3 diners none of us were thrilled with anything we ate and we did sample many dishes. I realize this is a minority opinion on these boards.

L'Atalier...WONDERFUL

Robuchon...Icy service took away from the experience

Guy Savoy...we had planned on the less costly TGV dinner but when we saw the choices for main course (filet of beef or red snapper) we quickly decided to go-for-broke and were not disappointed.

For a less costly dinner I always suggest Fiamma (MGM) or Sensi (Bellagio). Of course 'less costly' is subjective.... :raz:

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nuts!!

Daniel Boulud Brasserie will be closed when I am in Las Vegas June 4th -- July 3rd for renovations. (I leave on the 4th).

Grrrrrr.... I was looking forward to it.

Guess I can give Bouchon a try for dinner... But man, I really wanted Boulud...


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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Going to Vegas with a friend for Labor Day weekend -- first time ever for me, first time for her since we turned 21. (Trips to Vegas before you're 21 don't really count...)

Read most of the Vegas threads, and got recommendations, so we are DEFINITELY doing the following:

- Dinners at L'Atelier, Bartolotta and Lotus of Siam

- Brunch buffet at the Bellagio

- Something at JP Patisserie (everything looks good)

Also on my list are Border Grill and Bouchon (maybe -- ate at the one in Yountville and liked it but have been hearing mixed things about the Vegas version... cash cow for Keller? frozen frites? etc.). I would like to try Wing Lei and Guy Savoy but we only have three dinners.

So, some questions for you Vegas experts:

Are any must-try places missing from the list? I know I skipped over a bunch of off-Strip places -- that was intentional. I'll do Rosemary's, Settebello etc. next time.

Any recommendations for lunch besides what I already mentioned?

Should we do the $135/$155 tasting menus at Bartolotta or just stick with the a la carte?

Similarly: the full tasting menu at Robuchon or the "discovery" menu? (One of us will probably get a tasting and the other will order a la carte, and then we'll share everything...would timing be a concern with this plan?)

And last: can we just put ourselves in the hands of the Lotus of Siam folks and have them order for us? I am basically ignorant of Thai food since all the Thai restaurants I've been to are of the "pick protein from list A, pick curry from list B" variety. I would really like to experience something new.

Thanks!


Edited by Diann (log)

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Can you share a tasting menu?  I know my tasting menu experiences, if my spouse tried to take any of my food I would have been slapping hands!  So anyone who has done that tasting...is it realistically sharable?

I wouldn't plan on sharing a tasting menu at most places, but I've read that they are happy to accomodate at Robuchon.

Anyways, we both want to try the widest variety of dishes, even if it only means getting half a bite. More importantly, my friend is a vegetarian/pescetarian, which means the onglet and the quail are ALL MINE. :smile:

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Read most of the Vegas threads, and got recommendations, so we are DEFINITELY doing the following:

- Dinners at L'Atelier, Bartolotta and Lotus of Siam

- Brunch buffet at the Bellagio

- Something at JP Patisserie (everything looks good)

Any recommendations for lunch besides what I already mentioned?

Should we do the $135/$155 tasting menus at Bartolotta or just stick with the a la carte?

Thanks!

Diann-have a great time! I've got a few suggestions for you.

First, I would recommend the buffet at Wynn over Bellagio, especially if you are going for Sunday brunch. They are in the same price range and over the course of the past two years I think the quality at Bellagio has gone down while the quality at Wynn has gone up. The buffet at Wynn is smaller in terms of size, but the quality of the food is better and the setting of the dining rooms at the Wynn buffet make the rooms seem more relaxed and intimate than the cafeteria fell of the Bellagio buffett.

I would go with the Tasting menu at Bartolotta. While the ala carte menu is certainly good, the tasting menu will give you small bites of a wider range of dishes and will also give you a greater sense of the Chef's creativity. All his fish is flown in from Europe daily so you can't go wrong.

I am posting an excerpt of my experience at Wing Lei in the Wing Lei forum if you want to get an idea of what dinner is like there. They have two tasting menus-a seasonal tasting menu and a Peking Duck tasting menu. Both tasting menus are about $150-$175. Enjoy your trip and let me know how it was after you get back.

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nuts!!

Daniel Boulud Brasserie will be closed when I am in Las Vegas  June 4th -- July 3rd for renovations. (I leave on the 4th).

Grrrrrr....  I was looking forward to it.

Guess I can give Bouchon a try for dinner... But man, I really wanted Boulud...

The word in the restaurant community is that the head chef left in late May to open his own place in Las Vegas. I'm not sure of the timing on when he will announce his new restaurant. I think they probably closed for both renovations and to transition to a new head chef.

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Guy Savoy -  The full-on tasting menu/worth every penny!  Class and service beyond great.  I know, I thought we'd go on the cheap but couldn't resist once we sat down and felt the amazing warmth of Franck Savoy and the rest of the staff.

Foodie-Girl, I'm so glad you went all out. Guy Savoy is one of the best dining experiences I have ever had. Question: Franck Savoy, would you consider him one of the best maitre d'/host you have ever encountered at a restaurant? I'm imagining him as a maitre d' from yesteryear, from a previous age ... What do you think?

Going to Vegas with a friend for Labor Day weekend -- first time ever for me, first time for her since we turned 21. (Trips to Vegas before you're 21 don't really count...)

Read most of the Vegas threads, and got recommendations, so we are DEFINITELY doing the following:

- Dinners at L'Atelier, Bartolotta and Lotus of Siam

- Brunch buffet at the Bellagio

- Something at JP Patisserie (everything looks good)

Also on my list are Border Grill and Bouchon (maybe -- ate at the one in Yountville and liked it but have been hearing mixed things about the Vegas version... cash cow for Keller? frozen frites? etc.). I would like to try Wing Lei and Guy Savoy but we only have three dinners.

Diann, if you eat LUNCH at Lotus of Siam and order from the regular menu and NOT from the lunch buffet, you will have room for one more dinner. I can't speak about Wing Lei since I haven't eaten there yet. If you really want to splurge, go for Guy Savoy.


Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

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I wouldn't plan on sharing a tasting menu at most places, but I've read that they are happy to accomodate at Robuchon.

Anyways, we both want to try the widest variety of dishes, even if it only means getting half a bite. More importantly, my friend is a vegetarian/pescetarian, which means the onglet and the quail are ALL MINE.  :smile:

You will not have any issues sharing a tasting menu and ordering a la carte at Atelier. The idea of Atelier is to try and taste as many things as possible.


Eliot Wexler aka "Molto E"

MoltoE@restaurantnoca.com

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Guy Savoy -  The full-on tasting menu/worth every penny!  Class and service beyond great.  I know, I thought we'd go on the cheap but couldn't resist once we sat down and felt the amazing warmth of Franck Savoy and the rest of the staff.

Foodie-Girl, I'm so glad you went all out. Guy Savoy is one of the best dining experiences I have ever had. Question: Franck Savoy, would you consider him one of the best maitre d'/host you have ever encountered at a restaurant? I'm imagining him as a maitre d' from yesteryear, from a previous age ... What do you think?

Going to Vegas with a friend for Labor Day weekend -- first time ever for me, first time for her since we turned 21. (Trips to Vegas before you're 21 don't really count...)

Read most of the Vegas threads, and got recommendations, so we are DEFINITELY doing the following:

- Dinners at L'Atelier, Bartolotta and Lotus of Siam

- Brunch buffet at the Bellagio

- Something at JP Patisserie (everything looks good)

Also on my list are Border Grill and Bouchon (maybe -- ate at the one in Yountville and liked it but have been hearing mixed things about the Vegas version... cash cow for Keller? frozen frites? etc.). I would like to try Wing Lei and Guy Savoy but we only have three dinners.

Diann, if you eat LUNCH at Lotus of Siam and order from the regular menu and NOT from the lunch buffet, you will have room for one more dinner. I can't speak about Wing Lei since I haven't eaten there yet. If you really want to splurge, go for Guy Savoy.

***Franck Savoy is definitely one of the warmest more charismatic hosts I've enountered..definitely not 'old world style' as he's a young and handsome guy. He's the perfect combination of welcoming and highly efficient.

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nuts!!

Daniel Boulud Brasserie will be closed when I am in Las Vegas  June 4th -- July 3rd for renovations. (I leave on the 4th).

Grrrrrr....  I was looking forward to it.

Guess I can give Bouchon a try for dinner... But man, I really wanted Boulud...

I'll be staying at the Wynn in early Aug. Yes, in the heat of summer. Mind you, I'll just try out all the restaurants and if you wish, I can eat at Boulud for you ... :raz::raz:

On my short list at the Wynn: Alex, Bartolotta, Wing Lei, Boulud, the Buffet, Red 8 ...

I'm a little hesitant about Wing Lei. I looked at the menus of both Wing Lei and Red 8. The dishes at Red 8 look more Cantonese to me, which I'm quite familiar with. Is Wing Lei at a totally different level?


Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

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David,

What are your most memorable dishes from Guy Savoy? Any pictures or more details review about your private dinner? How often does Guy Savoy come to LV and when?

Foodie-Girl,

It seems that Robuchon was quite bad for you, what's the main issue? Had the service been fine, how would you rate the food there? When does Robuchon himself come and cook at the restaurant?

The report from everyone makes me curious to find the service there comparing to another great maitre d'hotel like Denis Courtiade (ADPA - he's very good in running the team) or Laurent Lapaire (L'Arpege - the best manager to run a restaurant - very warm, friendly and full sense of humour) or the most famous one - Jean-Claude Vrinat (Many claim Taillevent's hospitality as the world's best)

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anyone been to the new Davidburke yet? is it open yet?

I suppose David Burke Las Vegas should be open at the Venetian. I can check for you when I get there in August. I probably won't be eating there anytime soon. I still need to eat at Delmonico's as part of my on-going steak "research." And then there's Mario Batali's B&B Ristorante and Enoteca San Marco.


Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

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David,

What are your most memorable dishes from Guy Savoy? Any pictures or more details review about your private dinner? How often does Guy Savoy come to LV and when?

Foodie-Girl,

It seems that Robuchon was quite bad for you, what's the main issue? Had the service been fine, how would you rate the food there? When does Robuchon himself come and cook at the restaurant?

The report from everyone makes me curious to find the service there comparing to another great maitre d'hotel like Denis Courtiade (ADPA - he's very good in running the team) or Laurent Lapaire (L'Arpege - the best manager to run a restaurant - very warm, friendly and full sense of humour) or the most famous one - Jean-Claude Vrinat (Many claim Taillevent's hospitality as the world's best)

***I don't know when Robuchon is at the restaurant.

The main issue was the cold, unwelcoming service. Several people served us at various times and other than one young American woman no one ever cracked a smile let alone inquire as to our enjoyment of the meal. The atmosphere was sterile in my opinion.

The food was very good but the atmosphere spoiled it. Overall I would have to rate our meal at Guy Savoy much, much higher.

I have been to Taillevent in the past...many years ago...and I still remember how warmly we were welcomed.

When spending hundreds of dollars for dinner my expectation is some level of "we're so happy to have you dine with us" along with excellent food.

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David,

What are your most memorable dishes from Guy Savoy? Any pictures or more details review about your private dinner? How often does Guy Savoy come to LV and when?

Foodie-Girl,

It seems that Robuchon was quite bad for you, what's the main issue? Had the service been fine, how would you rate the food there? When does Robuchon himself come and cook at the restaurant?

The report from everyone makes me curious to find the service there comparing to another great maitre d'hotel like Denis Courtiade (ADPA - he's very good in running the team) or Laurent Lapaire (L'Arpege - the best manager to run a restaurant - very warm, friendly and full sense of humour) or the most famous one - Jean-Claude Vrinat (Many claim Taillevent's hospitality as the world's best)

I'm still working on a full review, with photos, of the dinner with Guy Savoy. But in the meantime, we had seven courses, my favorite being a filet of Sea Bass with a sprinkling of spices on the side that was a mixture of salt, pepper, mustard seed and coriander. The skin of the fish was very crispy. There were some tiny shitake mushrooms and tender stalks of chard under the fish. There was a butter sauce and then the waiter spooned a light seafood foam over the fish at the table. Chef Savoy was in town when I was there-both for the food events I was attending and to celebrate his one year anniversary at Caesar's. Unfortunately it is extremely hard to know when the chef will be in the kitchen. He only comes over a few times a year, and they tend to not announce it in advance.

What I found was as outstanding as the food was the service. As opposed to Foodie Girl's experience at Robuchon at the MGM, the service at Savoy is quite comfortable and welcoming, even given the restaurants high status. Guy Savoy's son, Frank, runs the front of the house at the Las Vegas dining room. He appears to be under 35, but actually carries himself in a distinguished manner that reminded me of the excellent Maitre d's of years past-the men who made it their lifelong profession to serve others.

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I'm a little hesitant about Wing Lei. I looked at the menus of both Wing Lei and Red 8. The dishes at Red 8 look more Cantonese to me, which I'm quite familiar with. Is Wing Lei at a totally different level?

I just booked Wing Lei for Sunday, July 1st. The duck tasting menu is what I am going for. Just sounds so good!

So, I have Wing Lei and Fix booked. I need dinner two more nights. Still debating what to do Saturday. With Boulud being closed while I am there, I am leaning towards Bouchon to get my French bistro fix.

Still not sure about the last night. :)


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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I'm still working on a full review, with photos, of the dinner with Guy Savoy.  But in the meantime, we had seven courses, my favorite being a filet of Sea Bass with a sprinkling of spices on the side that was a mixture of salt, pepper, mustard seed and coriander.  The skin of the fish was very crispy.  There were some tiny shitake mushrooms and tender stalks of chard under the fish.  There was a butter sauce and then the waiter spooned a light seafood foam over the fish at the table.  Chef Savoy was in town when I was there-both for the food events I was attending and to celebrate his one year anniversary at Caesar's.  Unfortunately it is extremely hard to know when the chef will be in the kitchen.  He only comes over a few times a year, and they tend to not announce it in advance. 

Thanks all for your suggestions -- we will try the Wynn buffet instead of the Bellagio...

I would really like to do Guy Savoy but am feeling apprehensive about the cost (we are not just spending money on food... there are show tickets, gambling, drinking, and spa treatments to be paid for). I know there's a cheaper TGV menu, but how much are the other tasting menus?

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I'm still working on a full review, with photos, of the dinner with Guy Savoy.  But in the meantime, we had seven courses, my favorite being a filet of Sea Bass with a sprinkling of spices on the side that was a mixture of salt, pepper, mustard seed and coriander.  The skin of the fish was very crispy.  There were some tiny shitake mushrooms and tender stalks of chard under the fish.  There was a butter sauce and then the waiter spooned a light seafood foam over the fish at the table.  Chef Savoy was in town when I was there-both for the food events I was attending and to celebrate his one year anniversary at Caesar's.  Unfortunately it is extremely hard to know when the chef will be in the kitchen.  He only comes over a few times a year, and they tend to not announce it in advance. 

Thanks all for your suggestions -- we will try the Wynn buffet instead of the Bellagio...

I would really like to do Guy Savoy but am feeling apprehensive about the cost (we are not just spending money on food... there are show tickets, gambling, drinking, and spa treatments to be paid for). I know there's a cheaper TGV menu, but how much are the other tasting menus?

I viewed the menus and prices at a few other places while I was in Las Vegas in May. I remember the tasting menu at Alex at the Wynn was about $175 without wines, the tasting menu at Michael Mina (seafood) at Bellagio was in the same range as was the tasting menu at Picasso at Bellagio. Of course if you add in the wines that are paired with each course it raises the ante by up to $75 or so.

You might want to try Bradley Ogden at Caesar's. I think you could have an appetizer, entree, dessert and a few glasses of wine for around $125.

One drawback to Las Vegas is that the fine dining restaurants have all gotten very expensive.

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What's the story on a good buffet for Sunday Brunch?

Bellagio or Wynn? Or some other place? (did Spice Market at Aladdin two years ago and thought it was so-so)


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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