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mongo_jones

The original Bombay dry gin

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my recent liquor purchases include the item in the title. have not tried it yet but it smells good. anyone know anything about this 1761 recipe? the label on the side indicates that it is distinctive because of a process called "vapor infusion" and possibly also the 8 specific aromatics that are used.

this ran me about $18--cheaper than tanqueray and the regular bombay spirits company products, and i am the cheapest bastard in the 80304.

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slkinsey   
my recent liquor purchases include the item in the title. have not tried it yet but it smells good. anyone know anything about this 1761 recipe?

It sounds like you have a bottle of "regular" Bombay Gin. This is, IMO, much better than Bombay Sapphire. Bombay Sapphire is of much more recent provenance, and is far less interestingly flavored (indeed, one hears from reputable sources that Bombay Sapphire was developed to be marketed to vodka drinkers).

the label on the side indicates that it is distinctive because of a process called "vapor infusion" and possibly also the 8 specific aromatics that are used

This alludes to Bombay's chosen method for infusing the spirit. At some point during the distillation/rectification process, the vapors travel up the column of the still and through baskets of various aromatics which flavor the distillate. Both Bombay "regular" and Bombay Sapphire are infused via this process.

this ran me about $18--cheaper than tanqueray and the regular bombay spirits company products, and i am the cheapest bastard in the 80304.

Better than Bombay Sapphire and cheaper too. That's why Bombay will occasionally be found in my pantry, but rarely Bombay Sapphire. In NYC we can get it for around 20 bucks a liter, compared to around $28/liter for Sapphire.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Busboy   
my recent liquor purchases include the item in the title. have not tried it yet but it smells good. anyone know anything about this 1761 recipe? the label on the side indicates that it is distinctive because of a process called "vapor infusion" and possibly also the 8 specific aromatics that are used.

this ran me about $18--cheaper than tanqueray and the regular bombay spirits company products, and i am the cheapest bastard in the 80304.

Beware this potable -- it is more addictive than crack. Sadly, people keep bringing into my house, causing me irreperable liver and brain damage. Use it for martinis, diluting it with tonic would be wrong, very wrong.


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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The major difference between Bombay and Bombay Sapphire is alcohol content. Bombay is 86° , Sapphire is 94°. Tanqueray is 94.6°.I find Sapphire to be slightly more viscous than regular Bombay.


Mark

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slkinsey   
The major difference between Bombay and Bombay Sapphire is alcohol content. Bombay is 86° , Sapphire is 94°. Tanqueray is 94.6°.I find Sapphire to be slightly more viscous than regular Bombay.

Well, I'd say that the major difference is that Bombay Sapphire is substantially less assertively flavored, although there are other differences of course.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Perhaps it's changed since my drinking days but I recall Tanqueray as being 86 proof in the US and 94.6 proof in Canada (and likely elsewhere). I haven't looked at a bottle in a long while. is that still the case or do I have my proof and countries reversed? (it was well over twenty years ago when I had both a US and a Canadian bottle side by side and the memories were fuzzy even the following day but there was definitely a difference).

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Hmmm, last time I had regular Bombay it reminded me a lot of Gordon's or Seagram's (both of which I rather dislike, taste too close to rotgut). I love Sapphire though, and I would like to think I enjoy the flavor of gin. Perhaps I will have to give it another try.

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He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

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slkinsey   
Perhaps it's changed since my drinking days but I recall Tanqueray as being 86 proof in the US and 94.6 proof in Canada (and likely elsewhere). I haven't looked at a bottle in a long while. is that still the case or do I have my proof and countries reversed? (it was well over twenty years ago when I had both a US and a Canadian bottle side by side and the memories were fuzzy even the following day but there was definitely a difference).

I just looked at the bottle of (tea-infused) Tanqueray I have in my fridge, and it's 94.6 proof.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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waves2ya   
I just looked at the bottle of (tea-infused) Tanqueray I have in my fridge, and it's 94.6 proof.

My bottle of Tanqueray is 94.6, as well.

I've been searching around for an article that appeared in the NY Times which was a round up of Gins; was a good read. Damned if I know what gin is the best gin - but I know some of 'em are skunky rot gut (juniper berry overload). And gin maniacs out there *do* wax poetic about Bombay's Sapphire...

Yes - I fit the Stoli drinker but 'wants to widen horizons and get with a good gin once in awhile' demo. But I don't want to miss what devotee's would call the 'vrai gin' experience.

Got any more suggestions (beyond slkinsey's Bombay 'normal' rec)...?

Thks!


~waves

"When you look at the face of the bear, you see the monumental indifference of nature. . . . You see a half-disguised interest in just one thing: food."

Werner Herzog; NPR interview about his documentary "Grizzly Man"...

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JAZ   
My bottle of Tanqueray is 94.6, as well.

I've been searching around for an article that appeared in the NY Times which was a round up of Gins; was a good read.  Damned if I know what gin is the best gin - but I know some of 'em are skunky rot gut (juniper berry overload).  And gin maniacs out there *do* wax poetic about Bombay's Sapphire...

Yes - I fit the Stoli drinker but 'wants to widen horizons and get with a good gin once in awhile' demo.  But I don't want to miss what devotee's would call the 'vrai gin' experience.

Got any more suggestions (beyond slkinsey's Bombay 'normal' rec)...?

Thks!

Here's an old thread with a wide variety of suggestions and opinions:

Best gins


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
Manager
jzimmerman@eGullet.org
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Author, The Healthy Pressure Cooker Cookbook and All About Cooking for Two

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waves2ya   
Here's an old thread with a wide variety of suggestions and opinions:

Best gins

Great thread - plenty to, ahh, drink about...!


~waves

"When you look at the face of the bear, you see the monumental indifference of nature. . . . You see a half-disguised interest in just one thing: food."

Werner Herzog; NPR interview about his documentary "Grizzly Man"...

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waves2ya   
Great thread - plenty to, ahh, drink about...!

And I was distracted all day.

Bombay - regular.

Negroni's last night.

My dinner party (new to gin in general, Negroni's in particular) thanks you.


~waves

"When you look at the face of the bear, you see the monumental indifference of nature. . . . You see a half-disguised interest in just one thing: food."

Werner Herzog; NPR interview about his documentary "Grizzly Man"...

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bobmac   
Perhaps it's changed since my drinking days but I recall Tanqueray as being 86 proof in the US and 94.6 proof in Canada (and likely elsewhere). I haven't looked at a bottle in a long while. is that still the case or do I have my proof and countries reversed? (it was well over twenty years ago when I had both a US and a Canadian bottle side by side and the memories were fuzzy even the following day but there was definitely a difference).

I suspect this might be just the different ways the countries measure alcohol content. I know it's certainly true for beer. Canada measures by volume, the US measures by weight. Since alcohol is lighter than water, the US figure is always going to be lower.


"Last week Uncle Vinnie came over from Sicily and we took him to the Olive Garden. The next day the family car exploded."

--Nick DePaolo

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lesliec   

I suppose they had to recall it - telling everybody just to add an equal volume of water would be too complicated!

 

But yes - two bottles for the price of one, effectively.  @Kerry Beal, did you score?

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Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

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That is what I thought too! Added value is so rare these days, but I guess they had to recall it because of regulations, and someone could over-imbibe and then drive or something they might be liable for. I bet very few turn it in for a refund. xD

 

For me it would be a bonanza, even though I don't partake of gin much, or basically ever these days. If I did want it, I'd take some juniper berries and infuse them in my (cheaper) vodka and see what shook out. I'm sure it's not quite as simple as that, but that is what gin tastes like to me. 


> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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lindag   

I chuckled when I saw that story in the news, it also occurred to me that no one would return their bottle.

I didn't know it was only sold in Ontario though.

Gin is just about my favorite liquor although I do like most everything (just not Scotch).

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19 hours ago, lesliec said:

I suppose they had to recall it - telling everybody just to add an equal volume of water would be too complicated!

 

But yes - two bottles for the price of one, effectively.  @Kerry Beal, did you score?

First I've heard of it! Wonder if it's too late?

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rotuts   

its my understanding that Gin or any distilled spirit is ' flavored alcohol ' i.e. EtOH

 

if you just added water , would you then dilute the flavor in 1/2 ?

 

Vodka is technically pure grain alcohol by US ' standards '  of course it flavored

 

or you'd be buying pure grain alcohol if you could find it.

 

back in the day I had a bottle of Blue Sapphire in the freezer.

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I think diluting it would probably work out just fine - it is distilled with the herbs/berries etc - then the distiller adds the water to dilute down to the proof that they are selling. I suspect it tasted wrong to the person who first discovered it because it wasn't diluted. If I had a bottle I'd likely dilute to 50% ABV which is an ideal proof for cocktails I find.  

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haresfur   

CBC said the recall was extended to several provinces. I understand them doing it, but I'd keep my bottle if I had one. I'd just factor the strength into the pour and stir with ice for longer.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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