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Japanese Foods--nabe


Jinmyo
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What is your favourite one pot meal?

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I would have to say anything that is dipped into ponzu! :biggrin:

But then again I am also partial to shabu shabu (with sesame sauce for the meat and ponzu for the veggies), then there is sukiyaki with the raw egg, and of course oden with lots of karashi, and I can never pass up anything with kimchi in it.

I think I love nabe for the garnishes!

I could eat nabe almost everyday, unfortunately my (born and raised in Japan)husband doesn't really care for it (he also doesn't care for soy simmered foods, miso soup, Japanese pickles of any sort, shiitake, etc, etc, I remind him on a daily basis he is lucky he didn't marry a Japanese woman! :biggrin: )

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Of course, Vic.

But then chanko cuisine is just lots more of whatever you would do with a nabe. As far as I know...

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Yosenabe.

Clams, shrimp, scallops, shitake, chicken, tofu, harusame noodles, greens in dashi and with a ponzu dipping sauce.

As for sukiyaki and shabu shabu, there are better ways to have beef, which is the feature.

But yosenabe is its own constellation of flavours. There are no better ways to have yosenabe than to have, well, more yosenabe.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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As for sukiyaki and shabu shabu, there are better ways to have beef, which is the feature.

My sentiments exactly. My mother frequently made sukiyaki, but it was never a favorite of mine.

Yosenabe makes winter weather bearable, even welcome.

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As for sukiyaki and shabu shabu, there are better ways to have beef, which is the feature.

My sentiments exactly. My mother frequently made sukiyaki, but it was never a favorite of mine.

Yosenabe makes winter weather bearable, even welcome.

Nah, I dont subscribe to this. You dont want to use great cuts of beef for sukiyaki, you want to use it to flavor the broth for the vegetables and noodles.

Sukiyaki (and shabu shabu) is still good. But I don't like it when the broth is too sweet.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Jason, it's not that sukiyaki isn't great.

It's that I find yosenabe sublime. And yes, coastcat, great in winter. Like boulliabasse but much more interesting and bright.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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As for sukiyaki and shabu shabu, there are better ways to have beef, which is the feature.

My sentiments exactly. My mother frequently made sukiyaki, but it was never a favorite of mine.

Yosenabe makes winter weather bearable, even welcome.

Nah, I dont subscribe to this. You dont want to use great cuts of beef for sukiyaki, you want to use it to flavor the broth for the vegetables and noodles.

Sukiyaki (and shabu shabu) is still good. But I don't like it when the broth is too sweet.

Really I like sukiyaki when it is sweeter.... Love dipping the beef into the egg and love the konyaku too.

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As for sukiyaki and shabu shabu, there are better ways to have beef, which is the feature.

My sentiments exactly. My mother frequently made sukiyaki, but it was never a favorite of mine.

Yosenabe makes winter weather bearable, even welcome.

Nah, I dont subscribe to this. You dont want to use great cuts of beef for sukiyaki, you want to use it to flavor the broth for the vegetables and noodles.

Sukiyaki (and shabu shabu) is still good. But I don't like it when the broth is too sweet.

Really I like sukiyaki when it is sweeter.... Love dipping the beef into the egg and love the konyaku too.

I too prefer my sukiyaki on the sweet side, and no dashi in mine please! My MIL adds so much dashi it is almost soup like and the flavor is so diluted.

Just some suet (never oil!) and soy, sake and sugar, that intense flavor mellowed by the egg............

we really need a drool icon! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I too prefer my sukiyaki on the sweet side, and no dashi in mine please! My MIL adds so much dashi it is almost soup like and the flavor is so diluted.

Just some suet (never oil!) and soy, sake and sugar, that intense flavor mellowed by the egg............

we really need a drool icon! :biggrin:

That is EXACTLY the way my aunt makes it, and that is the way I really like it. It's supposed to be a little dry, damn if I wanted soup I can order soup.

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Nah, I dont subscribe to this. You dont want to use great cuts of beef for sukiyaki, you want to use it to flavor the broth for the vegetables and noodles.

What, no Kobe tenderloin sukiyaki? :smile: I'm just not a big beef enthusiast, and when I do eat it, I want a thick, exceedingly rare bone-in steak or braised short ribs. Now if my mother had changed the recipe to use thin slices of pork, well, I'd have jumped for joy. Pork broth brings me happiness. (yes, I'm a simple gal)

Since we've finally dug out from the snowstorm (23" in our front yard! Eeep!), I can go out this weekend and indulge in the yosenabe craving that this thread has prompted. Being snowed in wasn't all that bad, since I spent much of the time eating pork gyoza spiked with Korean garlic-chili paste...

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  • 2 months later...

Nabe- the only thing that gets me through winter. A dish that always makes me say 'Nihonjin to kekkon shite yokatta' (I'm glad I married a Japanese)! Not only delicious and warming, but fun- a great way to eat a leisurely meal with people you like.

Just one problem- the weather outside is warm and sunny and I really don't feel like nabe! I think I'll stow away the portable gas burner and wait 'till November. Or a cool October weekend if we're lucky!

My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

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  • 4 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Just bumping this thread because it's almost nabe time again...

I can't wait. Lately I've been thinking a lot about shirataki, but the weather isn't yet cold enough. Also yudofu. Does that count as nabe?

Last winter I made a lot of kimchi nabe, and plan to again this year.

Anyone else craving nabe now that there's a bit of chill in the air?

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last week was perfect nabe weather, so I had a chicken meatball and chinese cabbage nabe eaten with ponzu.

sukiyaki is sounding really good about now........... :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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