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EvergreenDan

Rye and Bourbon in handles, good enough to sip.

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Reading on-line, I believe it is more likely than not that Bulleit has homophobic policies and therefore I no longer wish to buy their products. What do people suggest as alternatives? I like to buy in handles for economy, which limits options somewhat. @FrogPrincesse suggested to try Buffalo Trace for the bourbon and Wild Turkey Rye (101) for the rye. I've never seen Rittenhouse in a handle, and it's usually close to $30 here in Boston. Other options? Is Wild Turkey really sipping quality?

To avoid mixing the discussion of WHY and WHAT, please do NOT discuss whether you think my choice is justified here. If you wish to discuss that, start a new topic in food politics forum.

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Never mind, it wasn't important and sounded nastier than the jab it was meant to be. Regardless of where I stand on the topic of the Bulleit company, I don't want any Ill-will with EvergreenDan… an eGullet member I've learned a great deal from in the cocktail and booze arena. 


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

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1 hour ago, EvergreenDan said:

Is Wild Turkey really sipping quality?

I like the Wild Turkey Rye (101) fine in cocktails but find it harsh on its own, for my tastebuds, anyway.  I never see much rye in handles either.  In addition to Bulleit, Knob Creek, Winchester and Jim Beam are all that I've seen. And the Knob Creek is $60. 

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2 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

an eGullet member I've learned a great deal from in the cocktail and booze arena. 

 

Thank you for the kind words. It seems like there are a fair number of Bourbon options, including both Buffalo Trace (which I haven't had recently) and the ubiqutious Knob Creek Bourbon, which I can find in a handle. Rye it tougher. There is a fairly spendy Knob Creek Rye, but I don't think I've seen it in a handle. I'm looking to stay around $60/1.75L.

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I no longer drink alcohol but I remember an interview with Elmer T. Lee from Buffalo Trace who said any bourbon he chose to drink he put into a glass with ice and brought the ABV down to around 85% so it was sippable.

 

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6 minutes ago, suzilightning said:

ABV down to around 85% so it was sippable


He waters his bourbon down to 85%... what is he starting at? O.o

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18 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

I like the Wild Turkey Rye (101) fine in cocktails but find it harsh on its own, for my tastebuds, anyway.  

Agree. It's great for mixing, not so good for sipping.

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17 hours ago, EvergreenDan said:

Thank you for the kind words. It seems like there are a fair number of Bourbon options, including both Buffalo Trace (which I haven't had recently) and the ubiqutious Knob Creek Bourbon, which I can find in a handle. Rye it tougher. There is a fairly spendy Knob Creek Rye, but I don't think I've seen it in a handle. I'm looking to stay around $60/1.75L.

Your best option may be two bottles of Rittenhouse rye at $30/bottle (or Sazerac, which is about the same price I believe)! I am not aware of other ryes in that price range that would be good for sipping.

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You might be able to find Overholt Bonded at that price.

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On February 3, 2019 at 9:36 PM, Tri2Cook said:


He waters his bourbon down to 85%... what is he starting at? O.o

I imagine it was 85 pf

 

As to handles that are not expensive and good, WT has been blending in more older barrels in the WT101 bourbon due to the popularity of  Longbranch where a lot of the younger bourbon is going.  If you haven't tried it in a while you want to give it a go.  I picked up a handle for under $30 recently and have throughly enjoyed it neat but it takes water well

 

check out rarebird(dot)com and read about the WT101


Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
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I have to ask, why so cheap?  I am a poor pensioner and I'm sipping (indeed at the very moment) WhistlePig, single barrel, barrel strength.  (Not that I do so every night or very much.)  Why drink rotgut if you do not have to?  Colonel Taylor bonded works for me as well.

 

Disclaimer, I've never tasted Bulleit but I'm not about to now.

 

 

 

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14 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I have to ask, why so cheap?

You raise a good point. I don't drink rye much neat as I generally prefer Scotch when I'm in that particular mood. But I do sometimes, and I also serve it to guest who ask for it. Most of my rye consumption is in cocktails. I have not found premium spirits to be necessarily better in cocktails. I think to stand up to the other ingredients, some coarseness and brashness helps. Very smooth, refined, subtle spirits tend to result in a flaccid cocktail. (Smirking a bit, now.) Really cheap spirits aren't good either, particularly in something spirit-forward like a Manhattan.

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6 hours ago, EvergreenDan said:

You raise a good point. I don't drink rye much neat as I generally prefer Scotch when I'm in that particular mood. But I do sometimes, and I also serve it to guest who ask for it. Most of my rye consumption is in cocktails. I have not found premium spirits to be necessarily better in cocktails. I think to stand up to the other ingredients, some coarseness and brashness helps. Very smooth, refined, subtle spirits tend to result in a flaccid cocktail. (Smirking a bit, now.) Really cheap spirits aren't good either, particularly in something spirit-forward like a Manhattan.

 

I found I don't much care for rye in mixed drinks.  But I do enjoy it neat.  I confess I am not a Scotch drinker at all, as much as my son keeps tempting me.

 

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