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DiFara Pizza


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Thank you for the write-up.  It's 7am, and I *NEED* pizza.  More than that, I need THAT pizza.  I'm gonna go put on my walking shoes.  I've got a few thousand miles to cover.

I understand the craving. I've done some pretty crazy things to get there, including once walking from times square. It'll be worth it ! Enjoy your lunch.

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Here's another perspective on Di Fara from David Rosengarten...

http://www.davidrosengarten.com/content.as...pe=ezine&id=131

I gotta tell ya—as if I have to—I was really scarred by my Di Fara experience. Usually, the food's the thing as far as I'm concerned. But the level of sheer managerial incompetence here was mind-boggling.

This was perhaps the worst restaurant operation I've ever stepped into—including a lot of huts and shacks from southeast Georgia to southeast Asia.

I have nothing against the old guy; he seemed kind of pleasant when I met him five years ago. And there's no questioning his talent as a pizza-maker. But how much hubris do you have to have to ignore the fact that people are waiting an hour-and-a-half for a slice of pizza.....and sometimes not getting it? Hire a few people! Hire one person! Fix this!

* * *

I am not planning to go back to Di Fara anytime soon. And that's coming from me—the one who has made a career favoring funk over fashion.

Edited by slkinsey (log)

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  • 3 months later...
It's a stupid question.

If you have throngs of people waiting an hour and a half for a slice, why WOULDN'T you charge five dollars?

Absolutely correct. Every food board is having the same DiFara discussion. What kills me is the conclusion that some folks reach without thinking, which resembles a Yogi-ism: "no one goes there anymore, it's too crowded".

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Yes, simple supply and demand theory means the price is justified. I happen to think there's a market failure here, in that the pizza isn't good enough to justify that price, but as a matter of economics there's not much of an argument to be had here.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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At $5 per slice, you're buying part of a $40 pizza. I find this funny because (a) no way do I think Di Fara's pizza is worth $40 for a whole pizza; and (b) at the same time we hear people decrying a $40 pizza at Lucali like it's highway robbery.

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Interestingly, a whole pie is $25. So the by-the-slice markup is similar to the wine-by-the-glass markup at some restaurants.

Of course, for someone who earns $25 an hour, the real cost of the pie is $75: $25 for the pie and $50 for the time spent waiting. Plus transportation.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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