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Chris Hennes

Cooking with Madhur Jaffrey's Vegetarian India

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Cucumber Spears (p. 37)

 

Cucumber halves sprinkled with cumin and chili powder and then topped with a tarka. A delicious and refreshing first course.

 

Cucumber Spears p37.jpg

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Flattened Rice with Tomatoes (p. 205)

 

This reminded me a bit of a Mexican style of serving rice: it's not terribly strongly flavored so the pops of tomato predominate, with a relatively subtle spice blend. Tomatoes are out of season here right now so I used canned since they get cooked anyway, but I think fresh would be better.

 

Flattened Rice with Tomatoes p205.jpg

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Yogurt Raita with Tomatoes, Shallots, and Cucumbers (p. 334)

 

This is a very substantial raita, really nearly a salad in its own right. 

 

Yogurt Raita with Tomatoes, Shallots, and Cucumbers p334.jpg

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Salad with Indian Style Bean Sprouts (p. 342)

 

When I read the recipe before making it I was somehow left with the impression that the bean sprouts made up a substantial portion of the salad, but in reality they play a bit part. This is really a cucumber salad with tomatoes and mung bean sprouts added. Obviously you could make it with whatever proportions suited your taste, but I simply made it as written.

 

Salad with Indian Style Bean Sprouts p342.jpg

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Whole Moong and Masoor Cooked with Meat Seasonings (p. 149)

 

The dal here are cooked with cinnamon, bay, and cardamom. Then a sauce of onion, ginger, garlic, tomato puree, coriander, cumin, turmeric, chili powder, and garam masala is added before serving.

 

Whole Moong and Masoor Cooked with Meat Seasonings p149.jpg

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3 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

Whole Moong and Masoor Cooked with Meat Seasonings (p. 149)

 

The dal here are cooked with cinnamon, bay, and cardamom. Then a sauce of onion, ginger, garlic, tomato puree, coriander, cumin, turmeric, chili powder, and garam masala is added before serving.

 

Whole Moong and Masoor Cooked with Meat Seasonings p149.jpg

I love Dahl.  Looks delicious.


Edited by Okanagancook (log)

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Just now, Okanagancook said:

I love Dahl.  What is the kind of lentil are used?

 

Oh, sorry to be cavalier with the term here. No actual dal were harmed in the making of this dish, it uses only whole moong and masoor lentils.

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South Indian Dal with Vegetables (p. 166)

 

Like many of her dal dishes, as written this one comes out quite thin -- in this case I left it as is and served it with some pancakes. For vegetables it's got yellow squash, green beans, and tomato, and the lentils are toovar dal. The spice mixture is fairly complex this time around and includes sambar powder, fenugreek seeds, turmeric, onion, asafetida, mustard seeds,  dried chiles, and curry leaves.

 

South Indian Dal with Vegetables (p. 166).jpg

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Chickpea Flour and Tomato Pancakes (p. 248)

 

These chunky pancakes were delicious, plain or dipped in the night's dal. They require a couple of hours of lead time so they are only a weekend dish for me, but they're not hard to make. You make a chickpea flour batter with turmeric, chili powder, asafetida, and garam masala and let it sit for two hours. Then stir in chopped onion, green chili, and tomato. Fry them in a  bit of oil and serve immediately. 

 

Chickpea Flour and Tomato Pancakes (p. 248).jpg

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It will be at least 3 weeks until I have access to a store that sells asafetida.  How important is this particular seasoning?  It seems to appear quite often in the recipes.

 

Those pancakes look particularly inviting.

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25 minutes ago, Smithy said:

It will be at least 3 weeks until I have access to a store that sells asafetida.  How important is this particular seasoning?  It seems to appear quite often in the recipes.

 

Those pancakes look particularly inviting.

 

What?  No amazon prime in the desert?

http://amzn.com/B006POH22Y

 

This is the asafetida I have.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Smithy said:

It will be at least 3 weeks until I have access to a store that sells asafetida.  How important is this particular seasoning?  It seems to appear quite often in the recipes.

 

It's probably in 2/3 to 3/4 of the recipes. I've made some of these same recipes without it and they are still delicious, but its flavor is certainly present when you include it. So there's nothing wrong with omitting it, but when you get it you should make the dish again to see what changes.

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6 hours ago, Smithy said:

It will be at least 3 weeks until I have access to a store that sells asafetida.  How important is this particular seasoning?  It seems to appear quite often in the recipes.

 

Just a word to anyone unfamiliar with asafetida, don't let the odor of it scare you away.   Cooking with it transforms it.

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6 hours ago, Chimayo Joe said:

Just a word to anyone unfamiliar with asafetida, don't let the odor of it scare you away.   Cooking with it transforms it.

I agree.  

Though It is very pungent stuff.  I keep mine in a jar, in a ziplock bag, in another jar, in the garage.  

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Whole Mung Bean Pancakes (p. 250)

 

These pancakes are made from a batter of soaked, but uncooked, mung beans that are pureed in a blender along with a few spices. They are relatively neutral in flavor, so the book actually uses them as a base for several other variants on the theme. This is just the plain version, served with a spinach dish, rice, and a raita.

 

Whole Mung Bean Pancakes (p. 250).jpg

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Spinach with Dill (p. 110)

 

The truth is that I love spinach in pretty much all its guises, but the various Indian spinach dishes are unquestionably my favorites and this one is no exception. It's got a lot of dill and onion in it, plus some fresh tomato added at the end of cooking. The usual spice mixture applies, of course! This one is also pretty heavy on the garlic.

 

Spinach with Dill (p. 110).jpg

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2 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

Spinach with Dill (p. 110)

 

The truth is that I love spinach in pretty much all its guises, but the various Indian spinach dishes are unquestionably my favorites and this one is no exception. It's got a lot of dill and onion in it, plus some fresh tomato added at the end of cooking. The usual spice mixture applies, of course! This one is also pretty heavy on the garlic.

 

 

I'm 100% with you on the spinach. I'm surprised at dill, though. Not something I'd ever associated with Indian cuisine -  I would have thought it would be overwhelmed by the other spices - maybe that is why there is a lot of it. Interesting.


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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8 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I'm surprised at dill, though. Not something I'd ever associated with Indian cuisine

She's got several recipes in here that are quite dill heavy, and my local Indian grocer sells the stuff in large bundles, so some region or other must make quite a bit of use of it.

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22 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

She's got several recipes in here that are quite dill heavy, and my local Indian grocer sells the stuff in large bundles, so some region or other must make quite a bit of use of it.

 

I live and learn.

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I'm following along here with interest. The book is on my library queue. I'm on a very annoying restricted diet right now in which most legumes  and all wheat is off the table, so Asian food rules. Mysteriously chickpeas seem to be allowed, so those chickpea tomato pancakes have extra appeal.

 

I love the marriage of curry or turmeric and dill. I've seen recipes for  chana dal that often use dill. And sometimes I put both curry and dill in chicken salad; at first I thought it was like opposite ends of the earth, but I really like it. One of the most dramatic and delicious uses of turmeric and dill is in the Viet dish Cha Ca La Vong, a fish dish with rice noodles, heavy on both flavors.  

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Fresh Indian Cheese in a Butter-Tomato Sauce (p. 298)

 

Some version of this dish exists at every US Indian restaurant I've ever eaten at, I think (though often it's the chicken version rather than the paneer). It's very rich, with quite a bit of butter and cream in it, so it's unusual for the dishes of this book. In some ways it's redolent of some Italian pasta dishes with their cream and tomato bases, but of course the added spices are pure India. It comes out very saucy, so I served it with quite a bit of rice. It was delicious.

 

Fresh Indian Cheese in a Butter-Tomato Sauce (p. 298).jpg

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Fresh Cilantro and Yogurt Chutney (p. 307)

 

Cilantro, chiles, and yogurt, basically. I've put it on a bunch of different dals (and the paneer above, plus just plain rice), it's a nice accent point.

 

Fresh Cilantro and Yogurt Chutney (p. 307).jpg

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Black-Eyed Peas with Cilantro and Green Chiles (p. 122)

 

This is a very cilantro-heavy dish, which for those of us who like cilantro is a great flavor. Obviously those who can't eat cilantro need not apply here, it's not like you can just leave it out. I made it pretty spicy, which I enjoyed.

 

Black-Eyed Peas with Cilantro and Green Chiles (p. 122).jpg


Edited by Chris Hennes (log)
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Carrot Raita (p. 333)

 

I think I own three books all with this raita in them -- it must be one of her favorites. It's a bit sweeter than the others due to the carrots, but not objectionably so. It's not my favorite raita, but it's worth eating.

 

Carrot Raita (p. 333).jpg

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