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Experimenting with my Bread Machine


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  • 8 months later...
8 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Has anyone ever made brioche dough in their bread  machine?  If you have, would you mind listing the ingredient list for me?  I would like to make the dough but shape it into buns.  

I haven't made it but I'm sure there are recipes in my bread machine cookbooks. If you'd like them, I can post.

Deb

Liberty, MO

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8 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Has anyone ever made brioche dough in their bread  machine?  If you have, would you mind listing the ingredient list for me?  I would like to make the dough but shape it into buns.  

 

see the KAF recipe here.

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@Maison Rustique If one of your books has a recipe that calls for putting everything in the bread bucket at once i would love the recipe.  I'm not interested in anything that requires extra steps other than maybe chilling the dough before shaping into buns.

 

@lindag Thank you for the link.  What I am looking for is a recipe where the dough is made in the bread machine and the buns can be made with minimal time between the dough being ready and the buns being shaped.  I have a bun pan in which I will bake the buns.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A book I use all the time is Rustic European Breads from Your Bread Machine, by Linda West Eckhardt and Diana Collingwood Butts. It's an old book--1995--but the breads are wonderful. I make the Jewish Rye all the time. They have many recipes requiring a sponge/poolish/biga/etc., so it's clearly possible to use a starter of some kind. When I make bread that requires a starter, I mix it in the pan and leave it to do its thing, and then finish the recipe by adding the rest of the ingredients. Works fine. I don't know the availability of a cookbook this old.

 

My machine is a very old Hitachi, HB-201, vintage probably late '80s/early '90s. A real workhorse. I had to replace the bread pan once but otherwise it's been quite reliable. I only use it to mix and raise the dough, baking on a pizza stone in the oven. I never cared for the loaf that bakes in the pan because at 7,000 feet the crumb was inconsistent top to bottom (even after adjusting for altitude), and there wasn't much of a crust.

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Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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Thank you @Nancy in Pátzcuaro. My absolute favourite bread recipe originated with Eckhardt and Butts from Bread in Half the Time ©1991. It's called Bread Machine Pain de Mie which I have modified to add whole wheat and other stuff. Curiously my favourite pizza dough comes from that book too. Both recipes use semolina, I'm thinking that's perhaps why.

 

And I bought a copy of Rustic European Breads from Your Bread Machine just now on Thriftbooks.

 

Thank you again.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Eckhardt and Butts use volume measures rather than weight because that book was published before most of us found out about weighing flour for more accurate results. I've made notes in the book in recipes that I use a lot.

 

You know, when I'm making bread I don't pay too much attention to measuring flour. I use the scoop method and adjust the moisture/flour consistency in the bread machine as it's kneading. Of course if I'm baking something like banana bread or cookies I'm much more careful about measurements. Generally I figure about 125gr. per cup of all purpose, but I've seen websites that have it at 145gr., which is a big discrepancy. King Arthur says 120gr. Is there one reliable source for that information?  Everyone tells us to weigh the flour but no one has the definitive answer, or at least I haven't found it.

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Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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In Rustic European Breads from Your Bread Machine, I've noticed they start by putting in the yeast, then flour etc, then water. This is the exact opposite of the way I've always loaded (any) bread machine. Do you suppose that matters?

 

Also, I don't mix the dry stuff together first; I just dump as is into the bread bucket. Do you suppose that matters?

 

Also they mention Semolina Granules (*not* flour) and Durum Flour Integrale (whole grain semolina). Does anyone use either of these? Sourced from?

 

So, I've had a bread machine (multiple) for more than 30 years and this book is a *totally* new way of making bread for me. 🤣 🤣

 

 

Edited by TdeV
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49 minutes ago, TdeV said:

In Rustic European Breads from Your Bread Machine, I've noticed they start by putting in the yeast, then flour etc, then water. This is the exact opposite of the way I've always loaded (any) bread machine. Do you suppose that matters?

 

Also, I don't mix the dry stuff together first; I just dump as is into the bread bucket. Do you suppose that matters?

 

Also they mention Semolina Granules (*not* flour) and Durum Flour Integrale (whole grain semolina). Does anyone use either of these? Sourced from?

 

So, I've had a bread machine (multiple) for more than 30 years and this is a *totally* new way of making bread for me. 🤣 🤣

I always follow the directions given by my (Zo) machine's manual, i.e., liquids, followed by dry.

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3 minutes ago, lindag said:

I always follow the directions given by my (Zo) machine's manual, i.e., liquids, followed by dry.

Me too.  My machine is a Zo also.  The first bread machine I ever had was a Panasonic, in the early 80's.  It too called for wet on the bottom, dry on top.

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