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Kerry Beal

Chocdoc - Checking out Chocolate in Belgium

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Negroni - made the poor girl climb to

get the Noily Pratt which turned out to be white! I stood behind the chair to make sure she didn't fall.

 

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Tomato  soup

 

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Rose

 

 

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9 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Missed this - where is that found?

 

In the little side street where the main entrance to the Delirium village is found. If you walk from the Groote Markt through the Rue de Bouchers, turn at the end to the left and walk maybe 30 m, there is the pub with all the monastery beers (can't miss it). Turn right, that's the street.

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If you want to try another local neighborhood chocolatier, I suggest my favorite from when I lived nearbyy, Irsi, Rue du Bailli 15, off of Avenue Louise.

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Our day at Callebaut

 

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the classroom tabla rosa

 

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lunch after the factory tour and choc sensory event

 

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out for dinner with 4 of the gang - Negroni to start 

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7 hours ago, IEATRIO said:

If you want to try another local neighborhood chocolatier, I suggest my favorite from when I lived nearbyy, Irsi, Rue du Bailli 15, off of Avenue Louise.

Thanks - I'll check that out when we are back in Brussels.

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Salad in a jar? And?

 

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Tartar - not sure what's in their special blend 

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4 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Tartar - not sure what's in their special blend 

Very strange.   And with cooked egg.  

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6 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Tartar - not sure what's in their special blend 

 

Aah ... "américain préparé" :)

 

Without fries ?? Usually the put Worcestershire sauce, bit of mayo or egg yolk, brine from a jar of capers and a bit of tabasco. You should receive all these fixings on the side as well, together with minced raw onion and capers / pickles for mixing yourself.

 

The "salad in a glass" thing was big a couple of years ago, followed by the "soup in a glass". Haven't seen that in a while ...

 

 

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4 hours ago, Duvel said:

 

Aah ... "américain préparé" :)

 

Without fries ?? Usually the put Worcestershire sauce, bit of mayo or egg yolk, brine from a jar of capers and a bit of tabasco. You should receive all these fixings on the side as well, together with minced raw onion and capers / pickles for mixing yourself.

 

The "salad in a glass" thing was big a couple of years ago, followed by the "soup in a glass". Haven't seen that in a while ...

 

 

Fries were had - they just weren't on the table yet

 

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21 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

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Unless it's a trick of the lighting, it looks like they need someone to teach them how to properly hard boil an egg. ¬¬ xD

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26 minutes ago, Toliver said:

Unless it's a trick of the lighting, it looks like they need someone to teach them how to properly hard boil an egg. ¬¬ xD

I did have that thought too

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Once you have a Negroni and a glass of wine - you forget to take a picture of your amuse - eggs with those little shrimp 

 

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Steak with Bernaise 

 

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and a second salad 

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Might be just me but your meals aren't jumping out and wowing me this trip.  And, yes, that green ringed egg was a surprise for sure.  Usually seeing what you eat has me :raz:greener than that egg!

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Can I be the first to say, don't get saucy with me, bernaise!

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3 hours ago, Toliver said:

Unless it's a trick of the lighting, it looks like they need someone to teach them how to properly hard boil an egg. ¬¬ xD

 

The trick is to steam them rather than boil them. Steaming is a bit more tolerant on timing - and they peel easier.

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2 hours ago, Porthos said:

 

The trick is to steam them rather than boil them. Steaming is a bit more tolerant on timing - and they peel easier.

 

I think the trick for accompanying américain préparé is to leave it uncooked and discard the egg white ...

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