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DianaM

The Bread Topic (2016–)

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7 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

Yes, I do need to keep an eye on them and I was challenged yesterday because the light bulb inside the oven burnt out so I was peering into the window and really couldn't see the char until it was too late, like that one in the front.   New bulbs should be arriving tomorrow. 

I'd bet that a quick pass in the flame would be nice.  

 

I have, from time to time when necessary, achieved a bit of char with my big blowtorch.  Not so much on pita, but on large flatbreads that can go from perfect to ash in seconds under a gas broiler.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I find that it's better to err on the side of under cooking pita breads, as over baked ones are prone to become dry and chewy. Once baked, I place them in a closed container, covered with a towl, so that they steam and stay soft. Many people reheat pitas for serving over a strong flame, so that they char, and heat quickly without drying out.

Having a very hydrated dough is also key.

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~ Shai N.

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I took a ciabatta class last week at a local bakery and baked my first attempt today.  I made one loaf and half a dozen small rolls.  It clearly needs work but at least it's a start.

342401500_IMG_1935(1).thumb.jpeg.0d29cb82a058ceb178be6c9c605425b3.jpeg

 

The class was not hands-on but we were offered wine and snacks and sent away with a recipe, a loaf of ciabatta from the bakery and 2 bags of pre-weighed ingredients:  a small one for the poolish and a larger one for the dough.  I thought that was a good way to nudge everyone into actually baking.  The class:

5FE8474C-0484-418C-A67A-29A11CDE24B0.thumb.jpeg.a7ad9393307ea36342c0250741d783c9.jpeg

 

Snacks:

7821512A-DBCE-497B-B6F4-108727FE3D96.thumb.jpeg.ea90b4e46db1afbf177c26070d4c753d.jpeg

 

That's me in the blue shirt, apparently giving our instructor one of my classic blue_dolphin side-eye looks 🤣

069D27BB-3B10-40BD-BCF1-472C37B4208E_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.ddd52a388c3fe0e1bbe8284fc84ed649.jpeg

 

 

 

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He is kinda cute though. I have always associated caibatta with dimpling? But what do I know


Edited by heidih (log)
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1 hour ago, heidih said:

He is kinda cute though. I have always associated caibatta with dimpling? But what do I know

 

I don't believe he had dimples. 

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I think the dimpled one is a focaccia, the flatbread.

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On ‎2‎/‎16‎/‎2020 at 12:08 AM, MReichle said:

I think the dimpled one is a focaccia, the flatbread.

 

Went through to the keeper possibly.

 

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Bread02172020.png

 

Crumb02172020.png

 

Tonight's loaves.

 

There is something different!  The past two weeks I had been using the Ankarsrum dough hook because the ingredients are almost impossible to incorporate with the Ankarsrum roller.  Yet with the dough hook I'm left with a dense and disappointing crumb.  Granted Ankarsrum does not recommend the dough hook for the small amount of dough I'm mixing.

 

This time I employed the dough hook for quickly and painlessly incorporating the flour, water, and poolish.  Then after autolysis I used the roller to gently kneed the dough for 45 minutes.  Crumb is much more open.  Don't yet know how it tastes.  I have not finished my mai tai and peanuts.

 

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Taste and crumb and crust were exquisite though after a liter of methode rotuts I'm not sure how much it matters.

 

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On 2/15/2020 at 10:34 PM, blue_dolphin said:

That's me in the blue shirt, apparently giving our instructor one of my classic blue_dolphin side-eye looks


I used to teach in university and would identify that look as “not paying attention and eyeing the snacks instead” ...

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OK enablers/inspirerers  10:30pm but I am headed to kitchen to make up some no-knead dough. So cold here it can go overnight and then head to the fridge which is maybe warmer? 

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On 2/17/2020 at 9:02 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

 

 

 

Tonight's loaves.

 

There is something different!  The past two weeks I had been using the Ankarsrum dough hook because the ingredients are almost impossible to incorporate with the Ankarsrum roller.  Yet with the dough hook I'm left with a dense and disappointing crumb.  Granted Ankarsrum does not recommend the dough hook for the small amount of dough I'm mixing.

 

This time I employed the dough hook for quickly and painlessly incorporating the flour, water, and poolish.  Then after autolysis I used the roller to gently kneed the dough for 45 minutes.  Crumb is much more open.  Don't yet know how it tastes.  I have not finished my mai tai and peanuts.

 

 

I always made larger batches  4 - 6 large loaves  10 small loaves  and I used the hook to mix everything EXCEPT THE YEAST because I used hotter water - 150° F.  after everything was mixed thoroughly,  I removed the hook and allowed it to "rest"  for about 45 minutes. (Apparently I was using the "autolyse" method only I never heard about it as that name, it was just something I learned sometime in the past)

I then installed the roller/scraper with the roller about an inch from the side - mine locked down with some effort -  SPRINKLED THE YEAST OVER THE TOP OF THE DOUGH.

Starte the mixer and left it to do the FIRST KNEAD for 30 minutes.  I let the dough rest and rise - depending on the ambient temp - for 30 minutes to an hour. My kitchen is cold in the winter so longer.

Then set to knead for another 30 minutes.

Then turned out onto the bench, scaled to the weight for each loaf, left on the bench, floured and covered with a cloth for 30 minutes

then into the pan for a final rise and into the oven.    If making baguettes I shaped them, set them in a couche for the final rise.  (I bought the raw linen several yards at a time and cut to the length I wanted)

This gave me consistent results every time.  


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Posted (edited)

Baked twice yesterday.

Made two 750g batches of dough on Tuesday and took them out of the fridge yesterday.  First one came out in the morning so I could stagger the bake.  

 

1893724700_BreadBakeMarch3-4.thumb.jpg.4bde0a8497cb25d44e1dd24d9ffe33dd.jpg

Four baguettes and a small roll from batch one and four baguettes and four small rolls from the second batch.  Gave two of the morning batch away and one from

the second batch.

1702178059_BreadBakeMarch3-42.thumb.jpg.7b078fb106766ec960ff625cbf0e3e3d.jpg

Moe had an afternoon snack.  Buttered roll and cheddar cheese. 

1305415175_BreadBakeMarch3-4B.thumb.jpg.dfdf0a653b612a190f82856fd8a85289.jpg

Sliced a baguette this morning for Moe's breakfast.   

1762972836_TunaonBaguetteMarch5th2020.thumb.jpg.e8ad42919b15c28ac33144be34c0119f.jpg

A tuna sandwich.   Moe had half for breakfast and I'm taking the other

half to work for lunch. 

 

 

 


Edited by Ann_T (log)
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Folks have suggested I try higher protein flour.  Tonight's loaves were made with KAF Organic Bread Flour 12.7 percent protein...

 

Bread03092020.png

 

 

All other variables as close to last week's bread as possible.  Shape was a little wonky.

 

 

 

Crumb03092020.png

 

 

Crumb looks satisfactory.  I'm about to go assay the taste.

 

 

 

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The taste of the above high protein loaves was satisfactory.  The texture was chewy.  Not bad, but to my palate "chewy" is not a salient feature of French bread.

 

Tonight I used a higher extraction, lower protein flour...

 

Bread03192020.png

 

Crumb03192020.png

 

 

Taste and texture were as expected from my ideal of a baguette.  I now think low protein flour is key.

 

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I tried my hands at the Approachable loaf http://thebreadlab.wsu.edu/the-approachable-loaf/ 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/62486/community-bake-approachable-loaf-bread-lab

I made the starter the day before, left it overnight and placed in the fridge in the morning, because, well I had to go to work unfortunately.

Flavor is really great, I will be baking more of it, with some variations, next one with a stiff starter.

 

Happy baking

Approachable bread2.jpg

approachable bread5.jpg

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Vanessa

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On 3/5/2020 at 8:02 AM, Ann_T said:

Baked twice yesterday.

Made two 750g batches of dough on Tuesday and took them out of the fridge yesterday.  First one came out in the morning so I could stagger the bake.  

 

1893724700_BreadBakeMarch3-4.thumb.jpg.4bde0a8497cb25d44e1dd24d9ffe33dd.jpg

Four baguettes and a small roll from batch one and four baguettes and four small rolls from the second batch.  Gave two of the morning batch away and one from

the second batch.

1702178059_BreadBakeMarch3-42.thumb.jpg.7b078fb106766ec960ff625cbf0e3e3d.jpg

Moe had an afternoon snack.  Buttered roll and cheddar cheese. 

1305415175_BreadBakeMarch3-4B.thumb.jpg.dfdf0a653b612a190f82856fd8a85289.jpg

Sliced a baguette this morning for Moe's breakfast.   

1762972836_TunaonBaguetteMarch5th2020.thumb.jpg.e8ad42919b15c28ac33144be34c0119f.jpg

A tuna sandwich.   Moe had half for breakfast and I'm taking the other

half to work for lunch. 

 

 

 

 

Ann_, once again you breads are incredible.   But my real question is about your photography.    How do you consistently create pieces with extraordinary lighting, contrasts and colors?

 

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eGullet member #80.

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2 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Ann_, once again you breads are incredible.   But my real question is about your photography.    How do you consistently create pieces with extraordinary lighting, contrasts and colors?

 

 

@Margaret Pilgrim, Thanks.

 

  I just use a Samsung phone camera.  Until a year ago I used a Samsung S5 which I loved for photos.  I moved up five generations to a S10 Plus last May.

   I have a designated spot that I use to take all food photos and I have an LED desk lamp.  I replaced this lamp with the same model when the first one died, after I knocked it

off its perch one to many times. 

 

Lamp Bought at Staples

 

When we first started making our boards we had a butcher block made from a Birds Eye Burl and various pieces of Big Leaf maple.   

I had intended to sell it.  But kept it to take photos on. 

1273392291_BirdseyeButcherBlockIslandCart1.thumb.jpg.585fc132e49e61749fe5ba4854b6ade9.jpg

 

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Brava.    Good system and no small thanks to your superb "eye" and style.

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eGullet member #80.

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