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The Bread Topic (2015-2016)


Patrick S
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its easy

 

you do what you have to do with  the ingredients

 

but you shape and bake

 

in the Bread Machine, nice for me, Im restricted by volume, various times for different phases

 

but I do get nice toasting bread and and sandwich bread

 

Free Bakers can after   the Mix and Match  ( a long time ago I did this in the cuisinart )

 

you aver have the freedom for your Rise, you might Retard  etc

 

its just that.

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9 hours ago, rotuts said:

its easy

 

you do what you have to do with  the ingredients

 

but you shape and bake

 

in the Bread Machine, nice for me, Im restricted by volume, various times for different phases

 

but I do get nice toasting bread and and sandwich bread

 

Free Bakers can after   the Mix and Match  ( a long time ago I did this in the cuisinart )

 

you aver have the freedom for your Rise, you might Retard  etc

 

its just that.

 

In all seriousness, mix in the bread machine, shape, then bake in the oven.

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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Ive thought of that.  however, I only have the BVXL and the CSB

 

also its quite cold in my kitchen now that its winter time as I use a wood stove in the major room right next to it, even though the kitchen does not have a door.

 

also, well    ....   Im a bit lazy.  I do have a pan especially for the BV and CSB   which Ive gotten for this purpose.

 

the Pan is waiting to be Called Up.  it has been for some time.

 surprised.gif

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  • 2 weeks later...

Bacon and herb rolls- made on request from a family member. I've never really been a bread-baking person but this one came out quite nice. The individual balls are also filled with cream cheese but I seem to have forgotten to take a pic of the inside.fgbfg.png

This one was taken immediately after brushing on the butter, before it was absorbed- so glossy.gfgrb.pngfdgbdf.png

 

Edited by excv_
edited to remove extra photo i didn't mean to use (log)
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I've been making bread at home since the 70's and it's still my favorite pastime.

I've gone from a 4.5 qt. KA to a 5 qt. KA (Hobart-made) to a big Electrolux and then back to my 5 qt. KA.  After all that I now use my Zojirushi bread maker on the dough setting; then remove the dough, shape and bake in my oven.  Perfect every time because I can control the temp and time of baking.  I love how the bread maker takes all the work out of it, plus the cleanup is so much quicker (the bread pan is non stick and washes up in seconds), no big mixer bowl, beater and dough hook to wash!

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4 hours ago, lindag said:

I love how the bread maker takes all the work out of it, plus the cleanup is so much quicker (the bread pan is non stick and washes up in seconds), no big mixer bowl, beater and dough hook to wash!

 

Even easier, I never bother to wash my Zojirushi bowl.  I just wipe out the remains of the old dried dough before using.

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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I finally got around to trying a couple more panettone recipes. The first was actually a no-knead recipe (recipe here). Not bad, and certainly easy, but not what I'm looking for. The recipe called for a 1 hour 40 minute second rise, but mine wasn't risen enough even at 3 hours. Also, with the recommended baking temp of 375F, the top browned more than I'd like, even though I foiled the top for the last half of the bake. Great flavor, though getting the flavor right has never been the problem for me.

 

 The second recipe, from Serious Eats, turned out much better - indeed, probably the best of all the recipes I've tried so far. I used a 50/50 mix of dried cherries and golden raisins soaked in brandy, plus clementine zest and vanilla. The biga proofed for 12 hours, and the final dough for about 10 hours. My kitchen was a bit cold (winter finally arrived in Kentucky), so for the last half of the second rise I used a warmed oven. The clock was running out on me, otherwise I would have proofed for at least another 2 hours. The texture is not as gauzy, cottony, shred-able as I would want, but closer. The crumb is still more cramped than it should be. But I'm encouraged enough to continue experimenting. Next time, I'll plan ahead better and allow more time for proofing. A watched pot won't boil, and a rushed pannetone won't yield a cloud-like texture. This bread is reminding me that patience is a virtue.

 

 

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"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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12 hours ago, Franci said:
12 hours ago, Franci said:

Ok, I see which recipe you used here.

If you (contrary to me) have the time and/or the ambition (and wild yeast at hand), maybe you could try something like this.

 

 

 

That looks amazing! The large voids in that pannetone are exactly what I'm after. The translator on my browser seems to have done a reasonably good job translating from Italian, so this is going onto the to-try list! Molte grazie, Franci!

 

Quote

Lindag:

Patrick, you may not think your breads are quite perfect but they certainly are beautiful!

 

Thank you so much, Lindag!

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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12 minutes ago, Patrick S said:

 

That looks amazing! The large voids in that pannetone are exactly what I'm after. The translator on my browser seems to have done a reasonably good job translating from Italian, so this is going onto the to-try list! Molte grazie, Franci!

 

Sure! Wish you good luck with it and if you need any help in translation, just ask! If in the future, you want other recipes to compare, I can link you all the most popular recipes out there :)

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Yesterday's bake.

 

Biga%20January%2011th%2C%202016%201-XL.j

Dough was started on Monday with a biga. Both Bigas  tripled in about six hours.

 

Two batches of dough, 750g each at 68% went into the fridge for an overnight bulk rise. 

January%2012th%2C%202016-XL.jpg

   

Baked last night.  Netted two pizzas for dinner and four loaves.

 

January%2012th%2C%20sliced%20January%201

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Those are some beautiful-looking loaves ahead of me!  I've been working toward making my own sourdough rosemary olive oil loaf, because the San Luis Sourdough loaf of the same type is rarely available to me. I'm getting closer.  This batch sat in the fridge for a couple of days before baking (due to poor planning), and I think the pre-fermentation may have improved the flavor.

 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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I thought this might give you all a rise.

 

Please join me in remembering a great icon of the entertainment community. The Pillsbury Doughboy died yesterday of a yeast infection and trauma complications from repeated pokes in the belly. He was 71.
 
Doughboy was buried in a lightly greased coffin. Dozens of celebrities turned out to pay their respects, including Mrs. Butterworth, Hungry Jack, the California Raisins, Betty Crocker, the Hostess Twinkies, and Captain Crunch. The gravesite was piled high with flours.
Aunt Jemima delivered the eulogy and lovingly described Doughboy as a man who never knew how much he was kneaded. Born and bread in Minnesota, Doughboy rose quickly in show business, but his later life was filled with turnovers. He was not considered a very smart cookie, wasting much of his dough on half-baked schemes.
Despite being a little flaky at times, he still was a crusty old man and was considered a positive roll model for millions. Doughboy is survived by his wife Play Dough, three children: John Dough, Jane Dough and Dosey Dough, plus they had one in the oven. He is also survived by his elderly father, Pop Tart.
The funeral was held at 3:50 for about 20 minutes.
 
If you smiled while reading this, please rise to the occasion and pass it on to someone having a crumby day and kneading a lift.
Edited by paulpegg (log)

Paul Eggermann

Vice President, Secretary and webmaster

Les Marmitons of New Jersey

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  • Four-hour baguettes. They took closer to five hours, but it's a bit chilly in here today. Recipe calls for all-purpose flour, but I hardly had any left (how did that happen?) so I used bread flour. I think they came out nice, and they're very good, although next time I'll add a bit more salt.

Baguettes.jpg

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I made hamburger rolls, which I intend to use for salmon burgers next week, I'm assuming they'll freeze well. The recipe was for "light brioche hamburger buns" and they look great (haven't eaten any yet), but I'm not sure why they're considered a brioche. The recipe has one egg and 2 1/2 Tbs of butter. Even Reinhart's "Poor Man's Brioche" has four eggs and 1/2 cup of butter, and proportions of flour, yeast, liquid are not so different in the two recipes. Oh well, the rolls look very good, so no complaints. The recipe said to make eight, but I made ten and I think they're a good size. (The dough weighed 82 grams for each roll.)

Hamburger Rolls.jpg

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This is just a homemade "half brioche"  that I made using no recipe, per se, just took a regular brioche recipe and lightened it up. Someone took a bite before I could snap a photo.  LOL 

 

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19 hours ago, cakewalk said:

 

Hamburger Rolls.jpg

Hi,  these buns look great. What do you use to keep the sesame seeds attached? I've tried all recommendations but any seeds or toppings always fall off after baking.  Especially frustrating when I go to the trouble of making homemade bagels (which is the only way to get a decent bagel here in the mideast coast of Florida) 

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I brushed the tops with a whole egg mixed with about a teaspoon or so of water. Plenty of sesame seeds still fell off, it's inevitable (take a peek under the rack), and some more fell off when I put them in a bag, but enough stayed on. I think the key is to brush the entire top of the roll with the egg wash, including the sloping sides, and to use way more seeds than you think you need. They'll continue to rise after you sprinkle the seeds on, so what seemed like a dense covering of seeds will become much more sparse when they're fully risen.

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