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Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 2)


Becca Porter
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I do have some that I didn't send in and I am finding that the texture/flavor is changing a bit - and not for the better. I've kept each flavor in it's own plastic container. Any idea on why they might be "going bad" after only a week (or less)? The strawberry scraps I have left are actually yucky now and I am throwing them out.

I found that if I didn't beat the marshmallows long enough, they would pour into the pan fine, and spread without any problems, but were softer than the other kinds I'd made. Over the next few days, they began to become even softer and break down. This happened with my first batch of strawberry ones. It didn't make sense because I'd been making other flavors with no problems, but I didn't beat the strawberry ones for as long as the others and that's the only thing I can come up with.

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I do have some that I didn't send in and I am finding that the texture/flavor is changing a bit - and not for the better. I've kept each flavor in it's own plastic container. Any idea on why they might be "going bad" after only a week (or less)? The strawberry scraps I have left are actually yucky now and I am throwing them out.

I found that if I didn't beat the marshmallows long enough, they would pour into the pan fine, and spread without any problems, but were softer than the other kinds I'd made. Over the next few days, they began to become even softer and break down. This happened with my first batch of strawberry ones. It didn't make sense because I'd been making other flavors with no problems, but I didn't beat the strawberry ones for as long as the others and that's the only thing I can come up with.

Perhaps some sort of enzymatic reaction involving the strawberry puree? I wonder if freezing it first might make a difference?

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The No Sugar, No Corn Syrup all Splenda Marshmallows (Thats a mouthful) are on my agenda for this evening. Lets see how it goes! I'll report back in the afternoon

"It only hurts if it bites you" - Steve Irwin

"Whats another word for Thesaurus?" - Me

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I've always wanted to make marshmallows and just saw an article describing matcha (green tea) marchmallows in Rachael Rappaport's Coconut and Lime Blog . I actually got the link via the Chicago Tribune food section, though the article is originally published in the Baltimore Sun. I didn't realize it was this easy. I had everything done and setting in the pan within 20 minutes, which including blooming the gelatin, boiling the syrup, and whipping everything together. The "agonizing" part was waiting the recommended 3 hours for the marshmallows to set. The marshmallows turned out very, very good, for a first attempt. I really like the subtle green tea flavor, but I think I'll add a bit more matcha powder the next time as I like it a bit more pronounced. I may also dust with potato starch or corn starch instead of powdered sugar.

Buoyed by my success with the matcha marshmallows, I decided to have a go at guava marchmallows. I used the same basic recipe, substituing 1/2 cup of guava puree instead of 1/2 cup of water to bloom the gelatin. I also added about 1/2 teaspoon of dried yuzu for a citrusy accent. The guava marshmallows turned out a bit softer with a very, very delicate flavor with bursts of yuzu that got overwhelmed by the sweetness. I will add a bit more guava puree for the next batch, but I'm trying to decide how to cut down on the sweetness, perhaps reducing the sugar from 2 cups to 1.5 cups, or reducing the corn syrup. I may also use maltitol or Isomalt in place of some of the sugar.

Next up are Kona coffee, lilikoi (passion fruit), jamaica (edible hibiscus), roibus (red tea), ginger, and whatever interesting flavors I can think of. One of my friends wants me to try a "Mexican chocolate" marshmallow as she and her husband really liked my Mexican chocolate truffles made with coffee, cinnamon, ancho peppers, and chipotle peppers. I may even try a "Hawaiian chile pepper" marshmallow as my volunteer chile pepper plants that the birds brought are fruiting.

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The No Sugar, No Corn Syrup all Splenda Marshmallows (Thats a mouthful) are on my agenda for this evening. Lets see how it goes! I'll report back in the afternoon

Heh heh. I don't envy the job of cleaning that pot.

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Short of going through 30+ pages of marshmallow goodness, has anyone used a gelatin substitute in their marshmallows? It's an ethical issue for a fellow baker, who would like a vegan-like alternative. TIA

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Tuesdays with Dorie bakers all posted their marshmallow creations today. I'm always amazed by the variety of results and experiences from the same recipe.

By the way, in the recipe there is an extra 1 tablespoon of sugar listed, but nowhere in the instructions does it say where it goes. Does anyone know?

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The Tuesdays with Dorie bakers all posted their marshmallow creations today.  I'm always amazed by the variety of results and experiences from the same recipe.

By the way, in the recipe there is an extra 1 tablespoon of sugar listed, but nowhere in the instructions does it say where it goes.  Does anyone know?

I wonder if it's meant to be beaten into the egg whites? Curious, indeed!

Patty

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The Tuesdays with Dorie bakers all posted their marshmallow creations today.  I'm always amazed by the variety of results and experiences from the same recipe.

By the way, in the recipe there is an extra 1 tablespoon of sugar listed, but nowhere in the instructions does it say where it goes.  Does anyone know?

I wonder if it's meant to be beaten into the egg whites? Curious, indeed!

Try PM'ing Dorie. She is monitoring the "Baking: From My Home To Yours" discussion in this forum. I'm pretty sure she will respond.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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The Tuesdays with Dorie bakers all posted their marshmallow creations today.  I'm always amazed by the variety of results and experiences from the same recipe.

By the way, in the recipe there is an extra 1 tablespoon of sugar listed, but nowhere in the instructions does it say where it goes.  Does anyone know?

I bet that it's supposed to be an extra tablespoon of water to add to the gelatin. Or maybe teaspoon.

I bet 10 interweb dollars!

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The Tuesdays with Dorie bakers all posted their marshmallow creations today.  I'm always amazed by the variety of results and experiences from the same recipe.

By the way, in the recipe there is an extra 1 tablespoon of sugar listed, but nowhere in the instructions does it say where it goes.  Does anyone know?

I wonder if it's meant to be beaten into the egg whites? Curious, indeed!

Try PM'ing Dorie. She is monitoring the "Baking: From My Home To Yours" discussion in this forum. I'm pretty sure she will respond.

Great tip! That's just what I did. The answer? Add it to the egg whites during the beating process to help stabilize them.

So, do I get to collect? :raz:

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Great tip!  That's just what I did.  The answer?  Add it to the egg whites during the beating process to help stabilize them.

So, do I get to collect?  :raz:

$$$$$$$$$$ Don't spend it all in one place!

Edited by Madhat (log)
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The No Sugar, No Corn Syrup all Splenda Marshmallows (Thats a mouthful) are on my agenda for this evening. Lets see how it goes! I'll report back in the afternoon

Pringle, whatever happened with the Splenda Marshmallows - or did I miss the follow-up?

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  • 2 weeks later...
The No Sugar, No Corn Syrup all Splenda Marshmallows (Thats a mouthful) are on my agenda for this evening. Lets see how it goes! I'll report back in the afternoon

Pringle, whatever happened with the Splenda Marshmallows - or did I miss the follow-up?

The first batch didn't set quite right. I've toyed with the recipe a bit, and another batch is gone in to a pan to rest for the day, so we'll see what happens!

"It only hurts if it bites you" - Steve Irwin

"Whats another word for Thesaurus?" - Me

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Does anyone have a recipe for Lime Marshmallows? I love lime, and I think they would taste darn good. Anyone have any idea how much juice or zest I would use?

"It only hurts if it bites you" - Steve Irwin

"Whats another word for Thesaurus?" - Me

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Does anyone have a recipe for Lime Marshmallows? I love lime, and I think they would taste darn good. Anyone have any idea how much juice or zest I would use?

i would just follow the recipe replacing whatever liquid it calls for with lime juice. there's so much sugar, there's no way they would be too tart.

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Does anyone have a recipe for Lime Marshmallows? I love lime, and I think they would taste darn good. Anyone have any idea how much juice or zest I would use?

i would just follow the recipe replacing whatever liquid it calls for with lime juice. there's so much sugar, there's no way they would be too tart.

I would also throw some fine lime zest in at the end for a little pizzaz.

Then add tequila....just kidding (or am I? :cool: )

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Does anyone have a recipe for Lime Marshmallows? I love lime, and I think they would taste darn good. Anyone have any idea how much juice or zest I would use?

i would just follow the recipe replacing whatever liquid it calls for with lime juice. there's so much sugar, there's no way they would be too tart.

I would also throw some fine lime zest in at the end for a little pizzaz.

Then add tequila....just kidding (or am I? :cool: )

Oh, I thought when I said Lime on here, everyone knew that meant "the lime that accompanies all the tequilla"

"It only hurts if it bites you" - Steve Irwin

"Whats another word for Thesaurus?" - Me

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Gotta say, a while back I made margarita marshmallows -- lime, tequila, bit of salt in the dusting powder and.... To me they were vile. I can't even remember what it was that made them vile, just that I thought they were so gross I threw the whole batch out...

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I used the Nightscotsman recipe and just used all Lime juice in the gelatin mixture and no water. I also grated some zest to dust the top of the mallows with, and they came out awesome! Great Lime flavor!

And to finish and earlier thread, I finally got my "Splenda Mallows" to sit and they taste great! I used no real sugar, only Splenda! Its a Nice treat for the diabetic or Low Carb mallow lovers!

"It only hurts if it bites you" - Steve Irwin

"Whats another word for Thesaurus?" - Me

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