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Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 2)


Becca Porter
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I glue my marshmallows on to the graham cracker with a thin layer of chocolate. Perhaps this separates the marshmallow from the cracker?

Anyway, Sebastian your black raspberry marshmallows look really tempting. I looove that color!! Can anyone straighten out my berry knowledge for me? Mulberries. blackberries, raspberries, black raspberries... Are there any others to add to my confusion? What are the differences?

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KrazedMom, I know the info you're looking for is somewhere in the topic. It seems to me it was discussed last fall. If one of the confections people don't jump in with an answer, start reading backwards (and note to self, get going on the Marshmallow index in your free time)

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I glue my marshmallows on to the graham cracker with a thin layer of chocolate. Perhaps this separates the marshmallow from the cracker?

Anyway, Sebastian your black raspberry marshmallows look really tempting. I looove that color!! Can anyone straighten out my berry knowledge for me? Mulberries. blackberries, raspberries, black raspberries... Are there any others to add to my confusion? What are the differences?

Mulberries, despite appearances, are not related to blackberries and raspberries and grow on trees rather than canes. It's been so long since I've had a red, or American, mulberry that I don't remember what they taste like, and I've never seen or tasted either a white or black mulberry.

Blackberries and raspberries are both members of the genus Rubus (as are dewberries, cloudberries, thimbleberries, and salmonberries, none of which, as far as I know, are cultivated commercially). Dewberries are similar to blackberries while thimbleberries, which look like a strangely formed raspberry, don't have much flavor at all. I've not had an opportunity to try either cloudberries or salmonberries.

Crosses between blackberries and raspberries include loganberries, tayberries, and boysenberries. Loganberries are more tart, and tayberries less tart, than blackberries. Both have a distinctly different flavor than blackberries. Boysenberries are slightly less tart than many blackberry varieties and tend to be larger, but I don't find their flavor difference to be much different from blackberries -- more like the difference between different varieties of blackberries (e.g., Marion, Chester, Brazos) -- compared to the difference between blackberries and tayberies or, especially, loganberries.

The red raspberry is probably the most common raspberry type but there are also yellow varieties that are very similar in flavor. The yellow raspberries I have access to tend to be even more fragile than any of the available red raspberry varieties.

Black raspberries are smaller, have a higher proportion of seeds, and are less productive than red raspberries, but they have a distinctively different flavor that makes them worth searching out. Red raspberries seem to me to have a brighter, sweeter flavor than black raspberries. There's also a purple raspberry that's a cross between a red and a black raspberry, but I've never tasted one.

David

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Hey Sebastian (or open question really), did you find that enrobing your tasty looking treat above kept the cracker from becoming mushy after a short period of time? I've found that just a graham cracker/ fresh MM combo results in a less than appetizing softness of the cracker.

You either need to balance your marshmallow and cookie so that their water activities are the same (Aw), put a barrier in between them to stop the moisture migration (this is why your cookie get soft, i'ts taking water from your marshmallow), or eat them quickly. We choose the latter option, because things like this don't last long at our house 8-) if we had wanted them to keep longer, i'd definately have put a chocolate barrier in between the cookie and the 'mallow - a very thin layer would do it - in fact, you could probably simply use a brush and brush on cocoa butter - just be sure to 'seal' the top and sides of the cookie thoroughly -the chocolate will take care of the bottom. Of course, chocolate over the whole thing will do the trick too.

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  • 1 month later...

So many great ideas in this thread! I love marshmallow making -- but since I don't own a stand mixer I use a 9-speed Kitchenaid hand mixer. It actually works pretty well.

Jasmine tea is a favorite around my place... the flavor is subtle but awesome. I find Stassen brand has the most pronounced jasmine flavor; other brands I've tried must be brewed very strongly (or reduced) in order to have enough flavor for a full batch.

Mexican chocolate is also a great combo - I just make chocolate marshmallows and dust them in a mixture of cinnamon, powdered sugar, and starch. I prefer arrowroot starch over corn, although I'll use the latter in a pinch. I've also done what I called "horchata" flavor, which was just a light vanilla marshmallow with the same cinnamon coating as the Mexican chocolate.

Lastly, might I add that toasting them over a gas stovetop (or any other fire for that matter) is practically required?

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Oh!!!!!! I just discovered this thread. I am pretty new to eG and am finding my way around the various forums in some confusion. But marshmallows? I am in my marshmallow period and now I must download what? 32 pages of this thread...and on dial-up. A woman's gotta have marshmallows when she's gotta have 'em.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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  • 2 weeks later...

If I might return to an old thread...can you put inclusions into the marshmallow batter? My husband keeps telling me that I ought to put nuts into the marshmallows and I keep telling him that I have never heard of anyone doing this.

Who is correct? ....carefull.... :wink:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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If I might return to an old thread...can you put inclusions into the marshmallow batter?  My husband keeps telling me that I ought to put nuts into the marshmallows and I keep telling him that I have never heard of anyone doing this.

Who is correct?  ....carefull.... :wink:

Do it! We do a flavor called Almond Delirium - mix in toasted coconut and sliced almonds. People go absolutely crazy for them.

I think someone around here did pumpkin spice marshmallows and rolled them in chopped nuts - on vs. in, but still... go for it!

Patty

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Do it!  We do a flavor called Almond Delirium - mix in toasted coconut and sliced almonds.  People go absolutely crazy for them.

I think someone around here did pumpkin spice marshmallows and rolled them in chopped nuts - on vs. in, but still... go for it!

Consider it done! Toasted pecan bits go into the next batch. Anything to keep my husband happy.... :biggrin: He does bring me coffee in bed every morning.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Do it!  We do a flavor called Almond Delirium - mix in toasted coconut and sliced almonds.  People go absolutely crazy for them.

I think someone around here did pumpkin spice marshmallows and rolled them in chopped nuts - on vs. in, but still... go for it!

Consider it done! Toasted pecan bits go into the next batch. Anything to keep my husband happy.... :biggrin: He does bring me coffee in bed every morning.

A handful of mini chocolate chips or dried sour cherries wouldn't be a bad idea as well... I'm just saying...

Patty

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  • 1 month later...

Does anyone have advice about scaling up marshmallow recipes? I'm wondering how to adjust the whipping time so that the marshmallows turn out the same.

I am planning to scale up the recipe by 150%, and it will be made in a 7 qt mixer (1000 watts) instead of a 5 qt mixer (750 watts). Right now, I whip them for 12.5 minutes.

In developing the recipe I have now, I found over-whipping causes them to be tough, and under-whipping causes them to be less fluffy... and I want them to be just right. :)

Thanks!

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Question: How does everyone cut their marshmallows?

Would you use your guitar (if you have one)?

Currently I used my large scraper and scissors but I need something that will give me uniform pieces.

I use a guitar and it works beautifully.

Jeffrey Stern

www.jeffreygstern.com

http://bit.ly/cKwUL4

http://destination-ecuador.net

cocoapodman at gmail dot com

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  • 1 month later...
I just made peppermint marshmallows and pumpkin pie marshmallows to hand out to my work friends - they both came out perfectly pillowy and tasty.  All my girlfriends at work were amazed and raving about them.  :smile:

Isn't it fun, to see the looks of disbelief on their faces? :rolleyes:

But then I have disliked commercial marshmallows since Grade Two and have no idea why I first tried making real marshmallows. It was a mind-blowing experience. :biggrin: And dipped in dark chocolate? Ambrosia. Fit for the gods.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Well, poo. I just made a batch of marshmallows – they're setting up as I type. But apparently I had an attack of dyslexia while I was heating the syrup and only went to 225°F instead of 252°F (per Peter Greweling's recipe). I didn't realize until after I'd finished whipping and pouring it into the pan and was putting things away.

Does anyone know what kind of effect this will have on the finished marshmallows? Should I toss it now? Or do you think it will be okay?

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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Well, poo. I just made a batch of marshmallows – they're setting up as I type. But apparently I had an attack of dyslexia while I was heating the syrup and only went to 225°F instead of 252°F (per Peter Greweling's recipe). I didn't realize until after I'd finished whipping and pouring it into the pan and was putting things away.

Does anyone know what kind of effect this will have on the finished marshmallows? Should I toss it now? Or do you think it will be okay?

don't toss!! I would think they are probably going to be very soft....probably killer marshmallow creme or soft fluffs for hot chocolate.

I vote wait and see what you get and let us know. The best recipes in the world started out as OOOPS!

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Well, poo. I just made a batch of marshmallows – they're setting up as I type. But apparently I had an attack of dyslexia while I was heating the syrup and only went to 225°F instead of 252°F (per Peter Greweling's recipe). I didn't realize until after I'd finished whipping and pouring it into the pan and was putting things away.

Does anyone know what kind of effect this will have on the finished marshmallows? Should I toss it now? Or do you think it will be okay?

don't toss!! I would think they are probably going to be very soft....probably killer marshmallow creme or soft fluffs for hot chocolate.

I vote wait and see what you get and let us know. The best recipes in the world started out as OOOPS!

I don't know either, but I'll guess marshmallow creme also. Do let us know what happens.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Well... they set up fine because of the gelatin, but they're kinda... chewy... I'm not crazy about the texture. And I'm making them specifically for gifts, so I'm going to start over. Ah well. Teach me to try to make them late at night.

Oh, and Lior, it's "oh poo" (short for "oh poop") as in "oh crap" or "oh sh**" :raz:

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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Well... they set up fine because of the gelatin, but they're kinda... chewy... I'm not crazy about the texture. And I'm making them specifically for gifts, so I'm going to start over. Ah well. Teach me to try to make them late at night.

Oh, and Lior, it's "oh poo" (short for "oh poop") as in "oh crap" or "oh sh**"  :raz:

then they would be PERFECT in homemade hot chocolate...try it!

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I just made a second batch – heated to the correct temp, thank you very much – and they're much better. Even a taste right off the beater is lighter and fluffier. The first batch tasted... off somehow. I've tossed them. Sorry guys, I wouldn't have felt right giving them away, and I didn't really want to eat them myself. Oh well. Lesson learned. Never try to make marshmallows late at night after a long day at work. :rolleyes:

Edited by emmalish (log)

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have just finished my 3rd batch of marshmallows, and I would like to share some of the little tips that I learned along the way. Hopefully, they will be of some assistance to new marshmallow makers!

I have been using recipes from Eileen Talanian's Marshmallows book. I just noticed that she has posted in this thread! It's a terrific book, full of many flavour ideas, and I highly recommend it!

The first batch I made was Tahitian vanilla bean. I used the seeds from one bean and some extra vanilla extract, and added that to the bloom. I wasn't crazy about this batch. The flavour was a bit strange to me - perhaps it's the difference in flavour and fragrance between Tahitian and Madagascar Bourbon vanilla beans. I dusted this batch with corn flour. The texture of this batch was not to my liking. I thought I may have overwhipped it, but at that point I wasn't sure. I definitely had to scrape the mixture into the pan as it was very thick, and it held its shape and didn't settle completely flat, so the top wasn't level. These mallows were a bit too firm and chewy for my liking. I prefer mallows which melt in the mouth.

The second and third batches were total successes. I used Boiron puree to make passion fruit mallows. This time, I whipped the mixture (in my Kitchenaid) until it was fluffy but still quite soft. Getting it into the pan was simply a matter of pouring it out (still had to scrape the bowl), and it settled in the pan completely flat without any cajoling. These mallows had exactly the texture and flavour I was after. Very bright passion fruit flavour, and tender soft mallows which still held their shape after cutting. These ones were coated in potato starch.

Two weeks after the second batch, the leftover passion fruit mallows are still soft and flavourful. They're stored in a ziplock bag.

Some tips on cutting the mallows:

I spoon some starch onto the surface of the mallow slab while it's still in the pan, then use the back of the spoon to spread it around the entire surface. Then I position a wooden chopping board over the top and carefully flip both over together. The mallow slab doesn't come out of the pan yet - I have to insert a finger into the corner of the now upside-down pan and coerce an end-section out, and then the rest of the slab will follow the weight of the freed end-section and slowly release from the pan. Then I cover the now top of the slab again with starch. Instead of oiling my knife, I coat it with starch between every cut, and I do this simply by running it through the excess starch that has accumulated on top of the slab or on the board. I get 60 mallows from a 9"x13" pan by cutting 10 short strips, and then cutting those strips into 6 pieces. I thoroughly coat each cut piece with starch, put them aside and let them sit for a while, then I lightly coat each piece again and then thoroughly but gently pat all 6 sides of each mallow to get as much starch off as possible. This is time-consuming, but I feel necessary.

One problem I have found with these soft and tender mallows is that they are more delicate and susceptible to heat-damage. I express posted a package of these as a gift cross country, and was told that the mallows, which had just been put into a ziplock bag (and a thin postage satchel, no other protection), had melted somewhat and had formed one BIG marshmallow! Admittedly, there was a heatwave going on over there, but it's still something to be mindful of.

BTW, I use Davis-brand gelatin, which is manufactured in New Zealand, and it's not vegan but it is a Halal product.

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