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Jason Perlow

Dressing up the baked potato

62 posts in this topic

Cut in half and cross hatched for maximum topping ratio

Butter, sour cream, chives or green onions, lots of salt n pepper of course.

s=mobile]http://www.buzzfeed.com/arielknutson/amazing-ways-to-eat-a-baked-potato-for-dinner?s=mobile

This is what I do.

Me, too. To finish the peel the best way is to add fresh butter, salt and pepper, then fold the peel over making a nice butter sandwich. The peel should be warm enough still to let the butter melt just a bit. Then eat -- sometimes with the fingers if the "sandwich" is big enough and there are no guests at the table.

This is only theoretical, these days, sadly. But it's what I used to do and if I were younger, again, and not prone to packing on the pudgy pounds these days, I'd still do it.

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Rub with olive oil, bake in rock salt 450 deg F for an hour (pierce all over with fork after 30 minutes).

I've seen baking in salt done with other food as well, but Ive never tried it. Trying it with a baked potato seems like a good place to start. Would you be kind enough to explain your technique? Thanks!

I have a dedicated baking pan filled with salt, with a rack to keep the potato off the bottom. The potato is only partially covered in salt but I turn the potato when I pierce it at thirty minutes. The skin comes out quite crispy. I am tempted to try baking this way after removing the skin, as suggested by Lisa Shock.

Question for Lisa: do you pierce your potato?

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I've seen baking in salt done with other food as well, but I've never tried it. Trying it with a baked potato seems like a good place to start. Would you be kind enough to explain your technique? Thanks!

I have a dedicated baking pan filled with salt, with a rack to keep the potato off the bottom. The potato is only partially covered in salt but I turn the potato when I pierce it at thirty minutes. The skin comes out quite crispy. I am tempted to try baking this way after removing the skin, as suggested by Lisa Shock.

Thanks for your response. While I like the skin, I also like 'taters sans skin, so Lisa's technique certainly seems worth trying.


Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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Cut in half and cross hatched for maximum topping ratio

Butter, sour cream, chives or green onions, lots of salt n pepper of course.

s=mobile]http://www.buzzfeed.com/arielknutson/amazing-ways-to-eat-a-baked-potato-for-dinner?s=mobile

This is what I do.
Me, too. To finish the peel the best way is to add fresh butter, salt and pepper, then fold the peel over making a nice butter sandwich. The peel should be warm enough still to let the butter melt just a bit. Then eat -- sometimes with the fingers if the "sandwich" is big enough and there are no guests at the table.

This is only theoretical, these days, sadly. But it's what I used to do and if I were younger, again, and not prone to packing on the pudgy pounds these days, I'd still do it.

This is exactly what I do with the always on purpose leftover skins once my husband goes to bed. Delicious.

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I tried Lisa's method tonight...even if my potato cooked at 250 deg F for slightly longer than the hour specified. There was a nice crust. However the flesh was perhaps not as dry and flaky as an unpeeled potato baked at high temperature for an hour. I wonder what would happen if one simply baked the peeled potato at 450 deg F for an hour rather than the two stage cooking?

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If you ever find yourself in Instanbul, check out the Ortakoÿ area where you will find a decadently loaded version named kumpir. Butter and cheese are mixed through the interior, with sometimes really scary amounts of salt (warn upfront if you need to control your salt intake). After this you can choose from a wide array of generally previously jarred stuff like corn, peas, pickles (gherkins, cabbage, beets, carrots, etc.), but also Russian salad, bulgur salad kisir, olives, chopped onions and more. Topped with some sauce(s), you won't be hungry for a while again.

To get an idea, here's a little youtube footage:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=PcWC9CGBjO0 and http://youtube.com/watch?v=JrtfYd5br00

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...drool...


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I prefer little tin foil hats... ;-)

Serriously, I can't stand it when a restaurant does this... and I'm not referring to the little hats...

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Covered in salt and olive oil.. cooked till crispy

Add a little butter, some cheese, sour cream, bacon, chives

11654586243_ca95ebb224.jpg

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“I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted" JK

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