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Shel_B

Making Ravioli Without Making Dough

38 posts in this topic

I'd like to make some ravioli, but I don't want to make dough and go through the process of kneading and rolling.

Is there some sort of ready made dough that I could buy, perhaps in sheets? What about crimping won ton wrappers? Other options?


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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I know several people who regularly use wonton wrappers for ravioli. For my taste, the wrappers are a little thick, but if you don't want to make pasta, it's worth a try.


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
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Ive made ravioli-ish things with won ton pre-made wrappers. i didn't crimp them, I used an egg wash around the edge and sealed them with pressure. then let them sit a while before cooking.

never thought to try a crimp. they are 'delicate' so no rolling boil. get all the air out while youre at it.

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Not got round to trying it yet but this, from Ideas in Food, is on my Evernote list.

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&roid

that's a very interesting idea. i wonder if it would work somehow with a meat filling. the refrig. would have to be very cold and the

meat home ground etc.

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Not got round to trying it yet but this, from Ideas in Food, is on my Evernote list.

Now THAT looks interesting, and maybe even I could do it if I've got the concept right:

Make a ricotta filling and roll into balls. Bury the ricotta balls in flour and refrigerate for a few days. Pull the balls from the flour and add to boiling or simmering water. That's it? The article says the ricotta balls are "packed in durum flour" and then buried in flour. What exactly does packed in flour mean ... rolling the balls in flour and pressing the flour into the cheese filling?

So, if I've got the concept, could the ricotta filling contain leafy green vegetables, like spinach, kale, beet greens? The pic shows the balls laid out in the flour in what seems to be a sheet, in a single layer. Might burying them in a bowl work, and maybe having two or more layers (just thinking about space requirements in my small kitchen).


Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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I love that ricotta-ball idea, and will have to try it!

Shel, our grocery stores do sell sheets of fresh pasta, packaged in maybe 3x6 sheets, in the fresh pasta section. I've never tried working with it so I can't tell you precise size or price, just that it exists. If you have a deli area that sells fresh pasta - generally it's close to the cheese, butter, or otherwise lightly cooled open bins - you'd find it there, probably near the fresh pasta sauces.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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Shel, our grocery stores do sell sheets of fresh pasta, packaged in maybe 3x6 sheets, in the fresh pasta section. I've never tried working with it so I can't tell you precise size or price, just that it exists. If you have a deli area that sells fresh pasta - generally it's close to the cheese, butter, or otherwise lightly cooled open bins - you'd find it there, probably near the fresh pasta sauces.

Indeed! I should have checked earlier but didn't think of it. Our local Pasta Shop sells sheets of ready made pasta in several flavors, and it's always fresh. Bingo! Thanks for the thought.

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 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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I can only say that that is genius. The buried in flour idea... I feel a choucroute garni phase ending and a dumpling one beginning. Thanks for the link!

The wonton wrappers are perfectly serviceable and also make a great impromptu single-serving lasgana.

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Not got round to trying it yet but this, from Ideas in Food, is on my Evernote list.

Now THAT looks interesting, and maybe even I could do it if I've got the concept right:

Make a ricotta filling and roll into balls. Bury the ricotta balls in flour and refrigerate for a few days. Pull the balls from the flour and add to boiling or simmering water. That's it? The article says the ricotta balls are "packed in durum flour" and then buried in flour. What exactly does packed in flour mean ... rolling the balls in flour and pressing the flour into the cheese filling?

So, if I've got the concept, could the ricotta filling contain leafy green vegetables, like spinach, kale, beet greens? The pic shows the balls laid out in the flour in what seems to be a sheet, in a single layer. Might burying them in a bowl work, and maybe having two or more layers (just thinking about space requirements in my small kitchen).

We make these where I work, we call them gnudi. We make ricotta, drain it so it is fairly firm, scoop into small balls, and bury in semolina. The prep cook will put a couple of layers in a hotel pan with semolina in between. The gnudi stay in the semolina in the walk-in for 2 days, then come out of the semolina, shake off the excess, and dry in the walk-in for another day or two. The ricotta needs to be firm/sticky enough enough to hold together, and not overly moist.

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Not got round to trying it yet but this, from Ideas in Food, is on my Evernote list.

You can substitute ricotta with a lot more of other "fillings", like pumpkin puree, broccoli puree and so on.

Teo

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My new blog: http://www.teonzo.com/

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I tried this yesterday, as I mentioned in the dinner thread, it worked great but I didn't shake enough flour which was not ideal.

I made the gnudi again for lunch carefully scraping the excess flour and paring with a good tomato sauce, which goes with it so much better.

I was very happy with the result. Thanks for suggesting it.

image.jpg

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Franci, is that broccoli filling or spinach or something different altogether? Looks GOOD!


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Hi Judiu!

That is ricotta and spinach. If anybody in interested, I used: a bunch of spinach. After it was wilted and squeezed very well net weight was 70 g, I chopped it and added: 80 g grated parmigiano, 1 egg, salt, 250 g of ricotta, salt and nutmeg. 3 portions or 4 small. Looking forward to try with meat, kind of agnolotti del plin recipe or tortellini filling, to cook in stock.

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I had a question on these gnudi -- In the last 48 hours I have become obsessed with them, but I can't seem to find a consistent model -- they range from roll the filling in flour and boil all the way to bury the filling in durum (or semolina) and place in the fridge for 2 days. Franci -- your latest success at them appears to be exactly what I want to accomplish -- I guess my question is how long did the filling rest in the flour? I can't wait to make these on friday.

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is this type of flour difficult to find?

would some one point me in the direction of a picture of what Im looking for.

I love ravioli and used to make them all time time. this looks like a way for me to get back in the game.

many thanks !

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Here in the Chicagoland area, Durum and Semolina are relatively easy to come across -- also, come to think of it, would superfine "00" flour make more or less sense here? Or is 00 about the same as the others in this application? Thanks. Dan

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I had a question on these gnudi -- In the last 48 hours I have become obsessed with them, but I can't seem to find a consistent model -- they range from roll the filling in flour and boil all the way to bury the filling in durum (or semolina) and place in the fridge for 2 days. Franci -- your latest success at them appears to be exactly what I want to accomplish -- I guess my question is how long did the filling rest in the flour? I can't wait to make these on friday.

Sorry for the late answer, have been out all day. I formed the quenelles and buried in durum for two days, also cooked at day 3. It will work also if you form the gnocchi and roll in flour. I have some butternut squash I want to use and I'll pay more attention to how the skin feels if cooking immediately or after a couple days.

Rotuts, I used durum from King Arthur. I don't find durum easily in the store in my neighborhood but semolina should be easier, I don't use it very much.

In this regard, Unpopular Poet, I think in this case I'd prefer durum over 00 flour just for the texture of durum. I'd like to try also with cornflour.

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Franci -- thanks for the response (it wasn't late at all) - one more question -- would I be right in assuming that the gnudi float to the top when done, much like gnocchi? Thanks again --Dan

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would you use a small soft brush to remove excess flour?

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