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Kerry Beal

Ethnic foods I'm supposed to like - but don't.

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Although sad to say, most Korean food fits in that category for me. The hub loves Korean food and when we lived in NJ there were a lot of Korean restaurants nearby. At one place my husband loved -- we were the only non-Koreans in the place and a "special" waiter had to come to our table because he spoke English and the other waiters didn't -- I ordered a soup, figuring that would be "safe". But it turned out to be cold, with slippery noodles and then chunks of raw apple. My husband was happily slurping down all the quivery gelatinous stuff, he loved it, but I had to get up and remove my heaving stomach. Went next door and got a coffee and a bagel with cream cheese from a surly Hispanic guy (most of the bagel joints in northern NJ are run by Hispanics) and felt much better. Meanwhile, the English-speaking Korean waiter thought it was hilarious and comped my husband extra goodies.

Don't like Korean food? What? Bulgogi? You don't like bulgogi? How is it possible for anyone to not like bulgogi?

:huh:

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I participated in a series of posts similar to the current curry issue, except regarding Mexican food. The arguments were basically identical. Either "How can you dislike it all when the cuisine is so diverse?" or "You haven't had the really good stuff". My response was in essence I've been trying to like it for decades and just don't based on extensive experience.

Not sure how to resolve these two positions.

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That sums it up for me, as well. I've tried to like it and I just don't. I don't care what country it comes from et cetera, it isn't good to me.

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Seems to me that if you don't like it, there's no reason why you should force yourself. God knows I wish I liked fewer dishes. I like basically everything. A lot. Sadly.

Although I suppose I would ask gfweb if he's ever had "Mexican food" in Mexico. I'm thinking right now specifically of shrimp grilled over an open fire on a Mexican beach. Served with fresh limes or sour oranges to squeeze over. Not what I think most "norteamericanos" think of as "Mexican."

But, of course, really very Mexican.

And kinda hard to imagine anyone not liking it.

Unless, of course, you don't like shrimp.

In which case....

Oh, nevermind.

:cool:

.


Edited by Jaymes (log)
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I was about to make the "How can you dislike all curries, there are so many different ones, they don't all taste the same" argument, then realized it would sound pretty silly coming from a person who doesn't like any seafood.

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Quite obviously, munchymom, that is because you've never had properly prepared seafood. :wink:

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Quite obviously, munchymom, that is because you've never had properly prepared seafood. :wink:

Never mind. I was genuinely interested in what the common thread could be but you seem to prefer "it is because I said it is" snark over open discussion so I'll just move along.

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I agree with Tri2cook.. I am ambivalent about any one person liking or not liking it.. I am more interested in what could be going on that sparks the same reaction to a such a diverse number of dishes. Does aggresively spiced food in general turn these people off? Would a spicy fennel sausage inspire the same reaction?


Edited by Ashen (log)

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I have to believe that there are spices /flavor profiles (I hate that expression) that are disliked by large numbers of people. The Great Curry Debate points to one cuisine that is not universally enjoyed. The absence of Indian chain restaurants might be considered confirmation that at least in the US, Indian flavors aren't appreciated.

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I think Jaymes is right that turmeric could be a common thread. Also, my husband doesn't like any food that starts with a combination of onion, garlic and ginger, which is pretty common in most kinds of curry. (Sad because those are my favorite kinds of food!) I wonder if texture could also be a factor - curries usually are kind of soggy, with all the ingredients thoroughly cooked through, which could be a turnoff to folks who like crisp vegetables and rare meat.

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Quite obviously, munchymom, that is because you've never had properly prepared seafood. :wink:

Never mind. I was genuinely interested in what the common thread could be but you seem to prefer "it is because I said it is" snark over open discussion so I'll just move along.

Quite obviously, munchymom, that is because you've never had properly prepared seafood. :wink:

Never mind. I was genuinely interested in what the common thread could be but you seem to prefer "it is because I said it is" snark over open discussion so I'll just move along.

Don't be a sorehead. I covered all the things I don't like about Indian food on the first page of this thread. I'll expand it for you: it tastes "muddy" to me. There are too many spices and it is saucy and messy to eat. And, frankly, it disagrees with me.

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Although sad to say, most Korean food fits in that category for me. The hub loves Korean food and when we lived in NJ there were a lot of Korean restaurants nearby. At one place my husband loved -- we were the only non-Koreans in the place and a "special" waiter had to come to our table because he spoke English and the other waiters didn't -- I ordered a soup, figuring that would be "safe". But it turned out to be cold, with slippery noodles and then chunks of raw apple. My husband was happily slurping down all the quivery gelatinous stuff, he loved it, but I had to get up and remove my heaving stomach. Went next door and got a coffee and a bagel with cream cheese from a surly Hispanic guy (most of the bagel joints in northern NJ are run by Hispanics) and felt much better. Meanwhile, the English-speaking Korean waiter thought it was hilarious and comped my husband extra goodies.

Don't like Korean food? What? Bulgogi? You don't like bulgogi? How is it possible for anyone to not like bulgogi?

:huh:

Bulgogi I like. I said "most" not all...:)

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One point of clarification: I have only tasted Indian curries, I didn't know there were curries in other cuisines.

Some of the exchanges within this thread remind me of my FIL, whom I dearly love. When it comes to Bourbon and single malt scotches he strongly believes that if you don't drink them the way he thinks they should be consumed you are just wrong. I like Bourbon neat some days, other days with a sweet and flavored mixer. It's my palate, not his, that I seek to please. It took me many years to realize this was ok.

Will I ever try the curries of other cuisines? Probably not. The risk outweighs the opportunity. Is there a chance this will mean I miss out on a flavor I might enjoy? Yes. Can I happily live with this missing out? Yes.

Living in southern California I have access to some small family-run Mexican restaurants that put out what I perceive, partly based upon their base clientle, authentic regional Mexican cuisine, and can readily tell the difference between the food there and the bigger "Mexican" restaurants which serve very Americanized style food. Do I think that some people who "don't like mexican food" might enjoy the small places? Yes. Do I feel they have to go there and find out for sure? No. I allow them the choice of their palate.

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Ahem...before I post anything else...what is meant by the term "ethnic food"??

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Ahem...before I post anything else...what is meant by the term "ethnic food"??

When I started this thread we recalled there was a thread already about foods you don't like - since it was Pad Thai that didn't turn my crank we went with ethnic - recognizing that to the English - French food is ethnic. So there you go - broad as you like it!

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Kerry, glad to read that. :-)

For me, it isn't also much a particular cuisine as (as others have also said) certain ingredients and/or preparations. Off the top of my head, what comes to mind are things like Cajun étouffée (I don't like mud pies), refried beans (ditto), bibimbap (what's the point of having all those individual stuff then just mashing them into a icky mixture), creepy-crawly insects (grilled or stewed or whatever), haggis (just a little too many offal-ish things together)...and so on.

I am also one who finds the blanket dislike of "curries" by some to be curious. Interesting. As one surely must know, the term "curries" in the native cuisines is frequently not the usual or preferred term, heh. :-) That word is an English term that glossed over the many differences between the many preparations in various cuisines.


Edited by huiray (log)

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Ahem...before I post anything else...what is meant by the term "ethnic food"??

Asian to non-Asians etc.

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Ahem...before I post anything else...what is meant by the term "ethnic food"??

Asian to non-Asians etc.

Umm, what's "Asian"?

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You tell us, huiray. I recall you getting angry with me about your characterization of half the world's cuisine as Asian.

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Quite obviously, munchymom, that is because you've never had properly prepared seafood. :wink:

Never mind. I was genuinely interested in what the common thread could be but you seem to prefer "it is because I said it is" snark over open discussion so I'll just move along.

>

Quite obviously, munchymom, that is because you've never had properly prepared seafood. :wink:

Never mind. I was genuinely interested in what the common thread could be but you seem to prefer "it is because I said it is" snark over open discussion so I'll just move along.

Don't be a sorehead. I covered all the things I don't like about Indian food on the first page of this thread. I'll expand it for you: it tastes "muddy" to me. There are too many spices and it is saucy and messy to eat. And, frankly, it disagrees with me.

Well, if "saucy and messy to eat" are characteristics that make a person dislike food, then I suppose American-Italian red-sauce-type food is out, too?

Not arguing against a blanket dislike of "curries", even those you've never tried. Just trying to understand the reasoning.

These threads are always fun. They tend to bring out the worst in everyone (and I mean everyone).

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For a long time, the Chinese thought truffles tasted like mud. They fed the truffles to pigs.

Now they feed their truffles to the Europeans.

dcarch

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Anna and I have been discussing this a lot lately as the antipathy seems to be growing (I certainly didn't anticipate that when I began this thread).

We wondered if there was any connection to curry dislike and folks who have issues with their foods touching. So probably stews in general where each individual element can't be tasted separately.

Could the curry dislikers comment on how they enjoy other meals where food is presented in a melange vs each component cooked apart?

Just checking out a theory.

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I'm actually intrigued that most of what people have posted has had to do with flavour, rather than texture. There are some things that I find genuinely offputting not because of the taste, but because of the feel. Okra is among them - I actually like the flavour, but the sliminess of even deepfried okra is so offputting that I will actively avoid dishes in which it features. Granted, the steak-n-eggs/churrasco ecuatoriano thing I mentioned above has more to do with my rather strong allergy to the eggs involved, but I could just have easily mentioned file gumbo, which I can't stand not because of the flavour but because the okra gives it this completely cow-boogers texture that I cannot get past my lips.

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Anna and I have been discussing this a lot lately as the antipathy seems to be growing (I certainly didn't anticipate that when I began this thread).

We wondered if there was any connection to curry dislike and folks who have issues with their foods touching. So probably stews in general where each individual element can't be tasted separately.

Could the curry dislikers comment on how they enjoy other meals where food is presented in a melange vs each component cooked apart?

Just checking out a theory.

It isn't a matter of not liking foods touching. I just don't like either the flavors or the texture of the curries I have had. It's all so mushy to me. Maybe it's one of those tastes that is better acquired in childhood?

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Not sure - when I was a kid I could not stand the smell of curry cooking - ate it (also a child of depression era parents) - but don't recall enjoying it a whole lot. Can't recall when I got over that - but enjoy most Indian curries now unless they have too much coriander which tends not to sit well on my stomach.

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