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Chris Hennes

Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine at Home" (Part 1)

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Such Kudos to the MC and MC@H Staff for following this thread!

Bravo, and Clap Clap!

:biggrin:

:biggrin:

:biggrin:


Edited by rotuts (log)

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What type of connector does it have?

You can do a little research on McMaster-Carr.

Its the type K/J connector. I will have looked around, but seems as I mentioned, anything that can be submersed is super $.

Type K or whatever is not a connector. At least read the wikipedia article on thermocouples first.

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I made the confit as per the book's recipe and it did come out very salty. Maybe it's supposed to be eaten cold - it wasn't bad that way.

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Type K or whatever is not a connector. At least read the wikipedia article on thermocouples first.

Really?

http://www.onsetcomp.../adapters/smc-k


Edited by johnder (log)

John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

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I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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Thank you for the quick reply! I will consider what you advise for next time.

Overall is cooking confit sousvide supose to be very tender as well if done corectly?

I make SV confit duck all the time (admittedly not from the MC@H recipe) and the method you describe sounds very strange. SV for 24 hours with that much salt in the bag? Surely they mean to ask you to leave the legs in salt for a few hours, then wash it off and confit for 24 hours?

If done correctly, SV confit is a great alternative to the normal method. Much less wastage of duck fat, cleaner, and more convenient. And it tastes no different - dare I say better.

That's a big dare! Though I enjoy the duck confit I make sous vide, I've always felt that making it in the traditional manner offered a more distinctive, dare I say more delicious, confit.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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The books clearly states 2 legs (2.2 pounds) sprinkle with 40g salt & 4g sugar and then in the bag and even to put the left over that did not stick, in the bag as well. Being that mine was only 800g total I have put 30g & 4g. I think the call that technique hot cure.

That is why I had to ask you guys about it, the saltiest meal I ever eat! Felt bad four hours after that, drinking litters of liquids…

IMHO, the equilibrium cure in MCAH is too strong. Bear in mind that a kilo of turkey legs is only about 75% meat, so the cure is actually about 5.3%. I'd say half that is probably right. You would never cook 750 g meat with 40 g salt (or, at least, I wouldn't). That's 4 tbsp Diamond kosher salt or 2 tbsp table salt. No wonder you found the confit too salty.

I suggest you try your next round taking up Johnny's suggestion of using 20 g salt, even for conventional poultry. And that's still a cured product. IME, for an equilibrium brine without curing, you need to go down to 1.6% (or less), i.e., 12 g salt for 750 g meat (net weight). Also, at these lower concentrations, I find it works best to leave the product on the cure for two days before cooking, flipping every 12 hours to even out the salt distribution. YMMV.

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Wow!

I usually go with 1% to 1.5% salt in an equilibrium poultry brine, when using cure, about 1.8% salt.

~Martin


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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Type K or whatever is not a connector. At least read the wikipedia article on thermocouples first.

Really?

http://www.onsetcomp.../adapters/smc-k

Yes.That is a subminiature connector. The only relevance it has to type K is that it is colored yellow per the ANSI standard. You still have to connect the wires with the two screws, so wouldn't you technically be able to hook up any thermocouple you please?

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Aren't the prongs on the different connectors usually shaped differently depending on type?


--

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Aren't the prongs on the different connectors usually shaped differently depending on type?

The style of connection is not mandated by the thermocouple type. The type is only an indication of what conductor alloys are used. You can have multiple types with the same connection.

Again, wikipedia and McMaster-Carr are very useful resources here.

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I have a batch of the sous vide buffalo wings sitting in a brine at the moment. The flavoured oil, too, which serves as the base of the mayonnaise, is ticking away on the stovetop.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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I've made the pressure-cooked crustacean butter today, but I'm unsure if everything has turned out as it should. I used raw frozen lobster heads which I blanched and cleaned (eyes, gills, organs). I melted the butter, added the baking soda and the cut up shells and cooked it for an hour on high pressure. After cooling down naturally, I opened the lid. All the remaining lobster meat is browned (obviously from the baking soda fostered Maillard reaction).

What put me off a bit is the smell, which to my nose contains a hint of ammonia (my girlfriend did not notice that, however). We both tasted a knife-tip full of the actual butter and it seems to be fine. Am I imagining things, is that smell a normal byproduct of the process or did something go wrong?

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So ...

Buffalo wings -- I liked them, yeah, the sauce was merely good. I don't think it's so much a fault with the Modernist thing as it is the genre of sauce itself. Oddly I, too, like another eGer earlier in the thread, had difficulty getting the sauce to emulsify properly. I fixed it by manually whisking the broken sauce into an extra egg yolk.

Pork chop -- Dead simple technique but good, even tho' I grilled over gas rather than coals (would you stand around outside lighting and tending to a fire on a 40C day? I think it'd actually be illegal, even). Would maybe deep fry next time I didn't have a coal fire going. I used goose fat in the bag and before grilling in place of plain oil/lard.

Eggplant parmesan -- Made a few missteps along the way. My pressure cooker seemingly didn't seal properly so I wound up with a sauce that was a bit thicker, a bit more reduced than I suspect it should've been. Oh well. And then when I went to nuke the eggplant I realised I'd run out of paper towel and, again, on a 40C day wasn't going to go running around to buy some more. Nuked it nude. The eggplant, that is. Not me. I also finished the dish in the oven, as per the suggestion of someone here. Turned out okay but, yeah, can't really judge the recipe given the changes I made were important.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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The Vichyssoise is very nice on a hot day - but it only got up to 38 C here. I didn't use the diastatic malt powder and had no complaints about the texture. Found I got more juice out of the leeks by squeezing the pulp in my hands. The leeks were a bit more than my rice cooker SV coud handle easily.

I found that the steamer basket for my pressure cooker was the perfect size to fit above the bags in the rice cooker and, filled with a few rocks, kept them submerged.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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My so...

Pistachio gelato - I made my own pistachio butter. The gelato came out way too salty and was hard. Next time I will try to reduce the salt and use invert sugar to replace some of the sugar. If this doesnt work I will try a stabiliser (not sure which one - any ideas?)

Risottos came out very nice as well as the squash soup (which benefitted much from small pieces of Spanish jamon inside).

The lemon posset and lemon curd were very easy and very nice.

Polenta - tried twice. Once came out horrible. Replaced the brand of polenta and came out very nice - still just polenta.

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I've made the pressure-cooked crustacean butter today, but I'm unsure if everything has turned out as it should. I used raw frozen lobster heads which I blanched and cleaned (eyes, gills, organs). I melted the butter, added the baking soda and the cut up shells and cooked it for an hour on high pressure. After cooling down naturally, I opened the lid. All the remaining lobster meat is browned (obviously from the baking soda fostered Maillard reaction).

What put me off a bit is the smell, which to my nose contains a hint of ammonia (my girlfriend did not notice that, however). We both tasted a knife-tip full of the actual butter and it seems to be fine. Am I imagining things, is that smell a normal byproduct of the process or did something go wrong?

pep.,

This is something that we have experienced during testing. Because, with the pressure cooked crustacean butter, you are creating a sealed, high-alkaline environment there will be the slight odor of ammonia when you initially open the pressure cooker. The good news is that it dissapates and will not be present in the final product.

Johnny


Johnny Zhu
Research and Development Chef for Modernist Cuisine
johnny@modernistcuisine.com

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This is something that we have experienced during testing. Because, with the pressure cooked crustacean butter, you are creating a sealed, high-alkaline environment there will be the slight odor of ammonia when you initially open the pressure cooker. The good news is that it dissapates and will not be present in the final product.

Thanks, I find that reassuring (both that I didn't imagine the smell and that it is normal result of the process). It would have been an expensive experiment otherwise (even though I only bought lobster heads for this recipe, the price was pretty outrageous - almost US$ 12 per pound.

Another question regarding this recipe: You talk about saving the "lobster jus" remaining under the butter. In my case, this is liquid is a pretty dark greyish brown from particles of Maillardized lobster meat. Is there a simple way to clarify this jus without sacrificing the flavor (as one would with an eggwhite raft)? I mean, besides the obvious centrifuge ;-)

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I made the tsukane with Korean wing sauce. The meatballs seemed a little moist, but I suspect that's because I used 500g of mince but didn't think--until it was too late, at least--to adjust the quantity of Wondra. On that Wondraful note, as other people have observed earlier in the thread, Wondra isn't avaliable in Australia. I purchased White Wings Gravy Flour. Someone earlier in some other thread or maybe even this one said it's the same thing. I suspect that with this recipe in particular I wouldn't be able to tell if Gravy Flour was a BAD CHOICE but I'll report back if I have any problems with it in the future. Might be, it's just a rebranded product. Rebadged. Maybe.

Anyway. The meatballs are nice enough as is the sauce. 20 grams of sesame oil sounded like a lot so I cut it down to 10 grams. Tasting the sauce, it seems like I made the right decision.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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I made the pho this week and really, really enjoyed it. I did find myself seasoning the pho pretty aggressively (as I hadn't seasoned my brown beef stock, which is the base of this soup) with a few additional pinches of salt and extra fish sauce and a squirt of sriracha. Next time around, when making the beef stock, I will make sure to drain off the oil used to sautee the ground beef. Should have been obvious at the time but was something I forgot to do and I was too lazy to bust out my gravy-fat separator when the stock was done so the final product was a little oily and slick.

I will definitely quadruple this recipe next time, as the final product per the directions only yielded me around 3 1/2 cups of pho broth. I'd say the downsize of this is the cost for the ingredients, mainly the oxtails and red wine needed, especially since pho is so dirt cheap at Vietnamese restaurants.

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Since I didn't have my copy yet, I had to plan Christmas dinner with what MC had on its web site. The mac & cheese was a hit, of course, and the injection brining worked flawlessly on the fried turkey. It was nice to avoid creating a salt lick.

Since I had to order sodium citrate online, I also ordered some tapioca maltodextrin. With some leftover hazelnuts from my raw brussel sprout salad with hazelnuts, apples, and brown butter vinaigrette, I pureed the nuts into a butter and blended in the starch. Creating the powder was incredibly easy, and added another subtle dimension to it all.

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I was happy enough with the caramelised peanut sauce. It's very easy, altho' I think the recommended quantity of fish sauce is a little high. The fishy funk was felt a bit too strongly. Serves me right for not starting at 20g and working my way up to the full 40 gradually. Still the best sauce I've made from the book, tho'. I'd make it again.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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I'm doing the SV vegetable stock for the first time and have just realized that it's getting a bit late. Any harm in letting the bags in the waterbath overnight instead of 3 hours?

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Er, it's hardly an extra hour here or there. I'd be inclined to set an alarm for the three hour mark, wake up, chill the bags and go back to bed.

Ah, posted in the wrong thread - it's from the original MC (probably quite similar, though). Anyway, 3 am is not a fun time to be woken up to do kitchen stuff ;-)

I'm mainly concerned about overextraction from the spices, and maybe about cooking the vegetables to a complete mush, making straining more difficult. On the other hand, the recipe calls for an additional 30 minutes in a hot ultrasound bath, as well as 12 hours of refrigerated extraction. So five hours at 85 °C may just replace the 12-and-a-half in the original recipe ...

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