Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Dinner! 2011


ChrisTaylor
 Share

Recommended Posts

You really do have to be brave when making caramel for Vietnamese cooking. An underdone caramel is a bit one dimensional, the further you take it the more interesting it tastes. I've only ever made it with white sugar, has anyone tried other kind of sugars?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMG_1629.jpg

Chicken soup. Two chickens were used - one to make a roasted brown stock from an old Gourmet recipe (it makes fabulously tasty stock), and the second for the actual soup. Unfortunately, it wasn't a huge success. I should have used 100% stock for the liquid rather than diluting it with water. Some more aromatics might have helped too.

IMG_1626.jpg

This cheese from Artisanal, on the other hand, saved the meal. We were instructed to eat at room temperature and simply scoop it out with a spoon. It was sensational - almost as assertive to the nose as a washed-rind cheese (which it wasn't), incredibly complex, creamy dairy and hay flavors melting in the mouth.

Edited by patrickamory (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A faux chili made with some root veg and other leftover-y items:

303877_695679580751_37003198_35574649_976526967_n.jpg

I fried a miniscule amount of bacon, added onions, carrots and garlic to sweat, then some butternut squash and turnip, after a few minutes added a puree of roasted and soaked dried chile guajillo, ancho, and arbol, along with the soaking water and some chicken stock. after the root veg were mostly tender, threw in some pre-cooked pinto beans and their liquid, some frozen corn, and some poached shredded chicken from stockmaking activities last week. Garnished with "korean pepper", avocado, spring onions, and a squeeze of lime.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You really do have to be brave when making caramel for Vietnamese cooking. An underdone caramel is a bit one dimensional, the further you take it the more interesting it tastes.

Prawncrackers, Nguyen says that it's possible to take the sauce too far, so that it burns to "a bitter black stage." Do you think that's true? Nguyen's sauce is supposed to be bitter, but with sweet undertones.

patrickamory, don't keep us in suspense! What's the cheese?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You really do have to be brave when making caramel for Vietnamese cooking. An underdone caramel is a bit one dimensional, the further you take it the more interesting it tastes.

Prawncrackers, Nguyen says that it's possible to take the sauce too far, so that it burns to "a bitter black stage." Do you think that's true? Nguyen's sauce is supposed to be bitter, but with sweet undertones.

patrickamory, don't keep us in suspense! What's the cheese?

I followed her directions for caramel sauce as closely as I could and it is indeed bittersweet in a very nice way. Do what she says and you should have the same success.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Always wondered why they were called "Buffalo Wings" when they were chicken ;) Of course, it is named after Buffalo, NY which was where they were invented. Why didn't I realize that earlier? Delicious all the same!

IMG_6769.jpg

There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw
Link to comment
Share on other sites

patrickamory, don't keep us in suspense! What's the cheese?

I was afraid someone was going to ask that :sad:

I didn't keep a record of it! I think it was Fromage des Clarines, but that is a style and not a maker... it comes from the Jura border so break out your Arbois and vin jaune...

and if you're in NYC, request it at Artisanal!

edit: I'm certain now the maker was Jean Perrin. Please get it at an affineur who knows how to age cheese... that said, it IS available on Amazon :blink:

Edited by patrickamory (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Keith_W, those wings look great, though they bring up some bad memories of my meal during a recent Game 7 ... don't know if I'll ever be able to eat wings again ...

As it is, the recent bolognese cook-off got me looking at my Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, thinking I was going to make it again, as it's been at least a couple years since I've made Marcella Hazan's recipe verbatim.

And then right next to it in the book was the Carbonara recipe. I had everything on hand, and it took a fraction of the time. And it's yet another reminder that though I'm knee deep into Modernist Cuisine (thank you for the tip, Victornet) and it's just a tidal wave of wonderful information, keeping an eye on the classics is always important.

carbonara.JPG

Served with a Caesar salad - went to a little shindig a few weeks ago with a whole bunch of chefs in Dallas cooking their version of the Caesar, and they gave a recipe for it. This is one of them (figured I'd work my way through the whole group eventually), and it was good, though I don't quite know how creative you can get with it and still call it a Caesar salad ...

salald.JPG

That was a lot of writing for the Dinner! thread. Sorry about that; got a little excited.

(Edited to fix a typo or two)

Edited by Rico (log)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My gift to myself this independence day was a little charcoal UFO grill (since we're not a huge family, we don't need one of the 45-gal models). Hence - PINCHOS! Mangrove shrimp in wasabi-tomato sauce, and top-round steak that had been marinating for two and a half weeks in dad's secret "softening up" marinade. All of this over coconut rice with peas and a nice big garden salad. Dee-lish.

Pinchos.jpg

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Experienced plucking my first bird today. A Pheasant.

BlUjll.jpg

FcCiTl.jpg

I diced the liver and seared it quickly in duck fat, then added minced onion to the pan, then mixed all together with some diced foie gras and stuffed it in the bird. Roasted for about 25 minutes. Made a jus from the roasting pan. It was good.

JTCsQl.png

Was this a female??? If not, what kind of pheasant?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Grouse... pheasant.

The curved beak says 'not grouse' to me. Either way, given how prone pheasant is (game birds are) to dryness, especially in the breast, it looks very skillfully handled. mm84321, roasted at what temp ? Whole or in pieces ?

Edited: to put the right bird in quotes...

Edited by Blether (log)

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was this a female??? If not, what kind of pheasant?

Yes. A female pheasant from here in Connecticut. Not sure of the exact species. Absolutely beautiful bird.

7YWB4l.jpg

Grouse... pheasant.

The curved beak says 'not pheasant' to me. Either way, given how prone pheasant is (game birds are) to dryness, especially in the breast, it looks very skillfully handled. mm84321, roasted at what temp ? Whole or in pieces ?

It was roasted whole. On it's side for 8 minutes, then the other side for another 8, then finally finished on its back for 8 minutes more. The breasts were carved, and then the bird was put back in the oven for a few more minutes to finish cooking the legs. It was my first time cooking something from start to finish like that (plucking, gutting, roasting). It was a nice experience.

7z6Pcl.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...