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Dinner! 2005

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pork tenderloin on mushroom-bacon risotto, wilted spinach, oniony-mushroomy-balsamicky veal-stock-based sauce. tons of parsley.


"Bells will ring, ting-a-ling-a-ling, ting.... the bell... bing... 'moray" -John Daker

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But mushrooms too would be nice.

yes they would. But they'd kill me. You wouldn't want that would you Jin? :biggrin:


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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pork tenderloin on mushroom-bacon risotto, wilted spinach, oniony-mushroomy-balsamicky veal-stock-based sauce.  tons of parsley.

I haven't made pork tenderloin in a while. Thanks! You given me my idea for dinner tomorrow.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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A snowy evening necessitates soup. Hearty bowl of chicken noodle soup with lots of noodles, huge chunks of thigh and breast meat, celery, mushrooms and carrots.

And because I was craving greens, a gigantic bowl of oriental salad: a head of sui choy sliced thinly into, tossed with one bunch of chopped green onions, drizzled with a sweet soy vinegarette, and sprinkled with a mixture of sliced almonds, crushed ramen noodles and sesame seeds pan toasted in butter.

Fully intended to take photos, but we were too damn hungry after a pre-dinner round of snowman building and snow shoveling!


Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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tonight for dinner I made eggplant parmesean . I did it a bit different. added some white sauce to mellow it. it was very good.

also made short rib ravioli for the freezer (I think I'm coming down with a cold) short ribs/pecorino/ bit 'o white sauce/ lil spinach. hope they're good.

fried plantains...mmmm

today was not really a meal day, but a pre-flu sick day...so cooked stuff in the fridge and watched tv.

the ravioli turned out lovely, yet I really want a large ravioli maker...or something. it's still a pain in the ass to do.

I'll reduce the sauce from the shortribs, for the ravioli sauce.


does this come in pork?

My name's Emma Feigenbaum.

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Roasted Cornish game hens with herb crust (fresh rosemary with dried sage and tarragon in the coffee grinder + s/p); new potatoes boiled/seared in olive oil with kosher flake salt; sweet English peas plain; sautéed mushrooms with a dash of lemon juice and white wine.

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I was planning on making hamburgers last night (that picture of a glorious burger and tater tots at the top of this page was teasing me). But then I decided I didn't want the bun and switched it to chopped steak with mushroom sauce. What I ended up with was a quicker version of beef bourginion. I reduced red wine, added some demi glace from Les Halles, sauteed mushrooms, onion confit, some tomato paste. Needed something else, so I jumpstarted some carrots in the microwave, then simmered them in the sauce, with the seared burgers, braising everything together for a half hour or so. Voila, chopped steak bourginion! Served with Tater Tots for the frites. :raz:

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But mushrooms too would be nice.

yes they would. But they'd kill me. You wouldn't want that would you Jin? :biggrin:

As in dead? Really? That's awful.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Last night was pork butt marinated in tequila, lime and orange juices then rubbed with cumin, Mexican oregano, garlic, salt, pepper and ancho chile powder and cooked at 150 for 20 hours resulting in melting pulled pork with fresh corn tortillas, salsa, tomatillo salsa, onions, jalapenos, cilantro and crema.  Leftovers for lunch today for sure!

I am currently available for left over consumption. :biggrin: That sounds really good!

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Last night was pork butt marinated in tequila, lime and orange juices then rubbed with cumin, Mexican oregano, garlic, salt, pepper and ancho chile powder and cooked at 150 for 20 hours resulting in melting pulled pork with fresh corn tortillas, salsa, tomatillo salsa, onions, jalapenos, cilantro and crema.  Leftovers for lunch today for sure!

I am currently available for left over consumption. :biggrin: That sounds really good!

Thank you, kindly, hathor. There were definitely leftovers, we had planned on company for dinner but they had to cancel, the roast was 7 lbs! I froze some for enchiladas later in the week and have made a good dent on the rest just by passing the fridge on a regular basis :biggrin:

Dinner last night was spaghetti bolognese, salad, and Rosso di Montalcino. :wub:


Barbara Laidlaw aka "Jake"

Good friends help you move, real friends help you move bodies.

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My first 3 photo worthy dinners of 2005 ...

The first two were on a New Year's getaway on the Sunshine Coast, BC ... yes that's a fireplace in the background ... no, we had no snow. :sad:

gallery_16561_571_1105163681.jpg

Carne Asada w/ Cactus Tamales & home made salsa. Wine ... a 2003 Red Rooster Merlot (BC)

gallery_16561_572_1105163731.jpg

Tagliatelle w/ Smoked Tuna (thanks to my FIL) and Lemon. Wine ... a 2002 Sokel Blosser Blanc de Noir (OR). We discovered that wine at Park Kitchen on our trip to Portland and the Beer Fest. We'll be back in 2005!

gallery_16561_573_1105163777.jpg

Pastrami (courtesy of eGullet members nwyles & Chef Fowkes :biggrin: ) on a Dark Russian Rye. Served with a grainy mustard and an Okanagan Springs Premium Lager.

It's gonna be a great year!

A.

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It's good to be back to eG. Everyone's photos from the holidays look great. Upon our return from Europe, not only did I crash from jet lag and the fatigue of a wonderful trip, but my hard drive also crashed. The latter has been a harder recovery than the former.

We had delicious traditional dinners in Denmark, including Christmas dinner (on Christmas eve) of roast duck and fruits, sauce, brown potatoes, white potatoes, red cabbage, lots of red wine, and for dessert the Danes' famous rice pudding with a whole almond hidden inside one person's serving making them the lucky winner. That would be me!

On Christmas day, we were at the table eating and drinking and talking from 3:30 to 10:30, seven hours. That is no exageration! It was a slow progression through all the courses, but we got up only to go to the bathroom. We had several smoked and pickled fishes; liver pate'; cheeses; shrimp; fried flounder; eel; cucumbers, radishes, eggs and other garnishes; butter, curries, and other condiments; and Danish breads for serving all these foods open-face-sandwich-style. I am sure there was more; I should have written it down because it was too much to remember. Even though this stuff is eaten on the bread, it is customary to use a knife and fork. We drank wine and schnapps and many different kinds of beer including Christmas brews. At 10:30 PM when we somehow transferred our bodies from the table to the living room, guess what we did... We ate and drank and talked and laughed some more, this time chips and pretzels, fruits, and chocolates. They added vodka and rum to the other adult beverage selections. I managed to hang in through all this by drinking water in equal or more amount as the alcohol. After that we went to a pub for a beer and needless to say, it was the wee hours of the morning before we went to bed. Actually we stayed up late every night, making the most of every moment with our Danish family and friends.

On the evening we arrived in Denmark, we went out to dinner at the restaurant of the hotel where Morten, our "Danish son," works. (He is a personal trainer and also works at a fitness center, so we were lucky enough to workout each day in a beautiful state-of-the-art gym.) There was a special holiday menu and we had the six course meal. It was as good as it sounds. This is the English translation:

Clear Oxtail Broth

with ravioli & sunkissed tomatoes

Terrine of Foie Gras

with brandy & green tomatoes

4 Pieces Gratinated Oyster

Stuffed Quail with Confit of Leg

with parsnip & celery root puree

Selection of French Cheeses

Chocolate Variations

I can't remember the wine that Morten's father selected for us. It was a Bordeau-like blend. Bottles of that and fine Italian sparkling water were flowing freely. It was certainly a meal to remember.

In London we ate one dinner in our hotel. It was on the upscale side and very good, but not memorable like the dinner out in Denmark. The other dinner was very typical English fare at a pub in Huntingdon (with a pint of good Real Ale!).

One day we went into Germany and had a light lunch and of course German beer. We enjoyed all the food and drink we had in Europe, and it was great fun to be able to taste new things.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Since we got home from Europe, we've had some fine dinners, but I haven't been photographing as much. Here are two of the highlights.

gallery_13038_576_1105203102.jpg

For New Years day, I made a Hoppin John Risotto to go with quail for the main course. I used Carnaroli rice, fresh black-eyed peas, corn, pancetta, etc. It was yummy.

gallery_13038_576_1105203135.jpg

I ordered a bunch of Thai ingredients and we have been on quite a Thai kick. This was a larb recipe from Hot Sour Salty Sweet, different than the larb I made from that book previously. Actually this is the Aromatic Minced Pork, Shan Style. The same night we also had Shrimp in Hot Lime Leaf Broth from the same book. I also ordered sticky rice and a steamer, the traditional conical basket and pot, but I haven't tackled that yet.

Cheers!


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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One day we went into Germany and had a light lunch and of course German beer.  We enjoyed all the food and drink we had in Europe, and it was great fun to be able to taste new things.

Were you in Flensburg? If you saw a SMART car with a giant rental logo on the side, it was very likely ours :smile: Welcome back, in any case!

For christmas eve brunch my SIL always prepares a beautiful north sea smoked fish and "krabben" (little shrimp) breakfast, which is always the big highlight of the holiday. People always think of sausage and beer when they think of germany, but up north they have as much or more in common with Danish food and culture as they have with Bavaria. (I've also learned to love salty licorice.)

We have a houseguest starting tomorrow so I will be doing a lot of cooking soon. In the meantime, I have been happily subsisting on oatmeal, soup and cheese.

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Inspired by Daddy-A (actually it was more like a craving that I couldn't get rid of. A craving he started by telling me what his dinner was) I had the last of my eG pastrami. Warmed in the oven, covered in a grainy cassis mustard on crackers (no bread in the house) It was so tasty, but of course, now I don't have any left :sad::hmmm: That's it for my cooking this week, and that wasn't really cooking.

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Were you in Flensburg?

YES!

gallery_13038_576_1105213118.jpg

We could have seen your car! You were in Germany visiting family over the holidays? Imagine that, we could have seen each other. Morten was telling us about the similarities between their culture and northern Germany's. On the way between Fredericia and Flensburg, we stopped at a discount store with lots of great deals on wine, beer, sodas, chocolates... lots of stuff, and all kinds of candy. Maybe you know of it.

You are way ahead of me on the salty licorice. Oh my, I think it is nasty. I have never been able to take that!

And yes, the little shrimps... what we were served were really tiny, but they were tasty.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Flens! You should be very proud of your experience, that is a "cult" local brew. It is famous especially for the odd bottles (I will dig up a photo as soon as my husband comes back with the laptop) and their advertisements are very funny.

Example: Big american Texas lookin' dude walks into a Flensburg bar, and sits next to a local.

Texan: "It takes me three days to drive around my ranch"

Flensburger: "Yeah, I had a truck like that once"

(And so on...)

edited to add photo. Note the cool pop-top. Sorry it's a rather old photo, and we'd had a few when we took that.)

gallery_17531_173_1105252535.jpg


Edited by Behemoth (log)

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My first entry.

Quite simply, tonight we're having twice roasted 5-spice duck with a tangerine sauce with Grand Marnier, wild mushroom rissotto, steamed broccoli and a baby green salad with balsamic vinegrette dressing.

This is my attempt at duck...not much meat and WOW look at all that fat! This is a peking duck (I think (white?)) purchased at a local asian market. Is there a particular type of duck with more meat or all they about the same?

Last night we had chicken breast with stuffed with cilantro, garlic and onions, a side of roasted cauliflower and roasted garlic loaf. The roasted garlic loaf was a hit. Bought it at Costco. My wife said she thinks she liked it better than the Gilroy Garlic Festival recipe I have for their garlic bread. I'm still undecided because it's a different taste all together. Man, just thinking about it, I can't wait until July 29th. The festival started in 1979 and since my first year in 1981, I've only missed 4 years. I love the GGF. (sorry for going OT).

Cheers,

Bob


My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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Behemoth, cool! I look forward to the photo.

Octaveman, welcome to this thread. Your food sounds good. I wish I could attend a Gilroy Garlic Festival!

gallery_13038_576_1105232319.jpg

Tonight we had a first course salad, which is unusual for us. We almost always eat salad after the main course. This had some smoked salmon, fried goat cheese, toasted (I burnt them) pine nuts, and olives, and it just seemed like something to eat first.

gallery_13038_576_1105232344.jpg

Main course was what I sometimes call Steak Diane Wellington, :laugh: a Steak Diane -type sauce with individual beef Wellingtons; baked potatoes, first rubbed with olive oil and coarse sea salt; asparagus tips; and roasted cauliflower. Wine was a Penfolds Thomas Hyland Cabernet.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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My first entry.

Quite simply, tonight we're having twice roasted 5-spice duck with a tangerine sauce with Grand Marnier, wild mushroom rissotto, steamed broccoli and a baby green salad with balsamic vinegrette dressing.

This is my attempt at duck...not much meat and WOW look at all that fat!  This is a peking duck (I think (white?)) purchased at a local asian market.  Is there a particular type of duck with more meat or all they about the same?

Last night we had chicken breast with stuffed with cilantro, garlic and onions, a side of roasted cauliflower and roasted garlic loaf.  The roasted garlic loaf was a hit.  Bought it at Costco.  My wife said she thinks she liked it better than the Gilroy Garlic Festival recipe I have for their garlic bread.  I'm still undecided because it's a different taste all together.  Man, just thinking about it, I can't wait until July 29th.  The festival started in 1979 and since my first year in 1981, I've only missed 4 years.  I love the GGF. (sorry for going OT).

Cheers,

Bob

Howdy, Bob. Welcome.

(I live very near to Gilroy, myself.)

Wanna try my recipe for garlic bread?

Ultimate Garlic Bread concoction

Mix in a smallish bowl with a fork:

1 stick butter, softened

A few cloves of crushed/minched fresh garlic

Grated parmesan cheese (about 2 TBL.)

Italian Seasoning (less than 1 TSP.)

Slather thickly on slices of (preferably) Alfaro's 4-Seed Sour (a local bread, but do your best), and broil until the butter and cheese are molten, and barely golden brown.

- - - - - - - - - -

Give it a try and let me know what your wife thinks. :biggrin:

I made more soup for dinner. Lentils, spicy and puréed, with the extra addition of the cap to the blender, which fell into the container and got a little, um, chewed up. (I strained it through a fine screen, and hope I'm not eating plastic. Glad it wasn't glass.)

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People always think of sausage and beer when they think of germany, but up north they have as much or more in common with Danish food and culture as they have with Bavaria.

Why do people think there is nothing but sausage and beer in Bavaria. Nowhere in Germany the variaty of food and culture is like in the southern regions, especially along the Austrian border. Also Bavarians drink as nearly as much wine as beer.

The majority of beerdrinkers in Germany live in " Nordrhein-Westfalen ". Even up North the consumption of beer is close to the Bavarians. Just the Oktoberfest in Munich raises the value of liters per person, but that's because millions of foreigners are in town. As sausages concern every region offers their own speciality. Up North the dish "Grünkohl mit Pinkel" is very famous. (Pinkel= a very fat sausage). "Sauerland" offers the famous "Bregenwurst". Thuringia is well known for their "Thueringer Bratwurst". Hessen, Baden-Wuerttemberg, is famous for Frankfurters and "Fleischkaese" etc., etc. The Berlin "Currywurst" is as famous as that one in Nordrhein Westfalen. So everywhere in Germany you'll find sausage eaters and beerdrinkers. I personally wouldn't miss one of the favourite Bavarian dishes "Kalbsweisswurst mit suessem Senf, Brezen und Weissbier" which is nothing but a light meal.

Munich, January, 2005


Edited by legourmet (log)

H.B. aka "Legourmet"

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People always think of sausage and beer when they think of germany, but up north they have as much or more in common with Danish food and culture as they have with Bavaria.

Why do people think there is nothing but sausage and beer in Bavaria. Nowhere in Germany the variaty of food and culture is like in the southern regions, especially along the Austrian border. Also Bavarians drink as nearly as much wine as beer.

The majority of beerdrinkers in Germany live in " Nordrhein-Westfalen ". Even up North the consumption of beer is close to the Bavarians. Just the Oktoberfest in Munich raises the value of liters per person, but that's because millions of foreigners are in town. As sausages concern every region offers their own speciality. Up North the dish "Grünkohl mit Pinkel" is very famous. (Pinkel= a very fat sausage). "Sauerland" offers the famous "Bregenwurst". Thuringia is well known for their "Thueringer Bratwurst". Hessen, Baden-Wuerttemberg, is famous for Frankfurters and "Fleischkaese" etc., etc. The Berlin "Currywurst" is as famous as that one in Nordrhein Westfalen. So everywhere in Germany you'll find sausage eaters and beerdrinkers. I personally wouldn't miss one of the favourite Bavarian dishes "Kalbsweisswurst mit suessem Senf, Brezen und Weissbier" which is nothing but a light meal.

Munich, January, 2005

My apologies, it was too broad a statement, meant only as an offhand example. In any case, I will soon have intimate familiarity with Bavaria, as we will be moving to Munich in the coming year! (Mountains!! Yay!!) :smile:

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Dinner last night with Mooshmouse & the Mouse Clan. This was our answer to not being able to brave the snowstorm and drive the 5 hours to Kamloops. In hindsight, the storm was welcome ...

gallery_16561_583_1105294531.jpg

Curried Butternut Squash Soup w/ Creme Fraiche & Curry Oil

gallery_16561_583_1105294625.jpg

Main course was Poulet Bascaisse a la Bourdain (still my favourite recipe from Les Halles).

gallery_16561_583_1105294588.jpg

Sides: Rice Pilay w/ Red Pepper & Saffron, Roasted Cauliflower, Tater Tots (for the little Mouse ... and maybe Moosh ... and me :laugh: )

The soup, chicken & pilaf used about half the chicken stock I made yesterday ... all in all a good excuse to multi-task.)

gallery_16561_583_1105294660.jpg

Dessert: Pears Poached in Red Wine, Vanilla & Star Anise. The poaching liquid is reduced for the sauce. Pears are served with French Vanilla Ice Cream & a Thin Gingerbread Cookie. This is J's best dessert ... and we have extra!

gallery_16561_583_1105294682.jpg

Cheese! Clockwise from the upper left: Quebec Goat's Cheese w/ Star Anise & Pepper, Welsh Smoked Cheddar, Port Stilton (the last of it from Les Amis du Fromage!), Camembert. The above served with Dow's 1996 Late Vintage Port.

No breakfast for me this morning. I'm still full!

A.

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My first entry.

Last night we had chicken breast with stuffed with cilantro, garlic and onions, a side of roasted cauliflower and roasted garlic loaf.  The roasted garlic loaf was a hit.  Bought it at Costco.  My wife said she thinks she liked it better than the Gilroy Garlic Festival recipe I have for their garlic bread.  I'm still undecided because it's a different taste all together.  Man, just thinking about it, I can't wait until July 29th.  The festival started in 1979 and since my first year in 1981, I've only missed 4 years.  I love the GGF. (sorry for going OT).

Cheers,

Bob

Howdy, Bob. Welcome.

(I live very near to Gilroy, myself.)

Wanna try my recipe for garlic bread?

Ultimate Garlic Bread concoction

Mix in a smallish bowl with a fork:

1 stick butter, softened

A few cloves of crushed/minched fresh garlic

Grated parmesan cheese (about 2 TBL.)

Italian Seasoning (less than 1 TSP.)

Slather thickly on slices of (preferably) Alfaro's 4-Seed Sour (a local bread, but do your best), and broil until the butter and cheese are molten, and barely golden brown.

- - - - - - - - - -

Give it a try and let me know what your wife thinks. :biggrin:

I

Ahh!! Cheesy Bread!! As it is fondly refered to by my son and his friends...we do a variation on this using olive oil instead of butter, and adding some chopped chili peppers to the mix. YUM.

Last night we had an honored guest for dinner, so we had delicious lobsters. Simple salad and potatoes. Ice cream for desert. Classic Americana!

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