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jsmeeker

What did you buy at the liquor store today?

557 posts in this topic

We are not what you would call social drinkers. I quit drinking for the most part a few years ago and DH drinks one neat vodka before bed. Oh, I sip vodka if I have a coughing fit in the night. Not exciting.

Last weekend was the Annual Dog Weekend which meant lots of food and lots of drink. American dog friends brought an assortment of stuff with them, most of which I have never seen before and have no idea of whether I could get them in Canada.

Dog Weekend booze.jpg

Left to right:

* Kirkland Tequila – in Ontario we can get liquor only in an LCBO

* Patron Silver Tequila – very nice, very expensive in Canada, for sipping

* Svedka vodka – love the snazzy red, white and blue bottle. Keeping the empty bottle in the Americana Room, assembled in the beginning to annoy our anti-American friends. Yes, there are anti-American Canadians (idiots)

* Patron XO Tequila Café – very tasty for sipping

* Pinnacle Chocolate Whipped Vodka. It was served by a friend from DE mixed with cherry juice. I have no idea why. I thought it was awful, but others liked it. From France

* Three Olives Vodka – empty bottle; I never got to taste it.

* Fireball Red Hot Cinnamon Whisky – ironically made in Canada, exported to the USA, and brought back across the border. I love pretty much anything with a bite.

* Vincent Van Gogh Dutch Chocolate Flavored Vodka – just opened it and tasted it. I hope that without being rude or hurting our friends, I can dissuade them from bringing either of the chocolate-flavored vodkas again. (No, they don’t belong to eGullet.)

There was much drinking of frozen Margaritas made from Goya Peach, Mango, and Pear. Personally, I like the regular lime based best by far.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Fireball is a plague on the market here in South Florida right now, it's everywhere, with distributors offering free bottles to bars and clubs to push. Years ago there was a trend for shooters using cinnamon schnapps and tabasco sauce (erk!) called fireballs. Of course, the more tabasco you could do, the bigger the "man" factor. Thank g-d that went away!


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Laphroaig 10 is hard to get in SD?

(Also, let us know how the Banks is!)

Hassouni,

Actually I got the Laphroaig 10 at Trader Joe's. For some reason it is priced at $50 or higher everywhere I've looked, but only about $30 at my local Trader Joe's. Everything else was from drinkupny.com.

The Banks rum is good and quite distinct from other white rums. It's a blend of rums that includes Batavia Arrack, and you can really taste it. It will make interesting drinks I am sure. I noticed that several recipes in the PDT cocktail book call for it; I was using Flor de Cana as a substitute but clearly the flavor profile of the Banks is very different, so I am starting to revisit these recipes.

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Actually I got the Laphroaig 10 at Trader Joe's. For some reason it is priced at $50 or higher everywhere I've looked, but only about $30 at my local Trader Joe's.

While here in Ontario, we pay $80 for the same bottling, and are grateful we can get it at all!


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Actually I got the Laphroaig 10 at Trader Joe's. For some reason it is priced at $50 or higher everywhere I've looked, but only about $30 at my local Trader Joe's.

While here in Ontario, we pay $80 for the same bottling, and are grateful we can get it at all!

There is a Trader Joes opening in Rochester next month - we need a road trip.

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Actually I got the Laphroaig 10 at Trader Joe's. For some reason it is priced at $50 or higher everywhere I've looked, but only about $30 at my local Trader Joe's.

While here in Ontario, we pay $80 for the same bottling, and are grateful we can get it at all!

There is a Trader Joes opening in Rochester next month - we need a road trip.

Sounds good to me!


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Back from the Arctic and I brought a few "nic nacs" home from various sources to remind me of the trip!

Started in Iceland where I picked up the typical local product, Brennivin schnaps, which is also known as "Black Death". I chose to pass on the classic companion dish, putrefied shark. Best drunk very cold! If at all...

I had carried a few bottles with me to keep me warm on those cold nights on the Arctic cruise. These included a bottle of Maladamado, a malbec based fortified wine from Argentina I discovered on our Antarctic cruise trip in February, a bottle of Pieau de Charentes and a single malt Irish Whiskey. None of them survived the cruise! it gets really cold in the arctic, even in the summer...

From Iceland our first stop was Greenland. Only settlement of note was Ittoqqortoormiit. Not much in the way of local spirits for purchase but the local Walmart style one stop shop had a rather eclectic, if somewhat limited, selection of spirits for sale. The supply boat only comes twice a year I am told. Not exactly a cocktail paradise I suppose.

IMG_6652_1.jpg

IMG_6639.jpg

IMG_6640.jpg

I have no idea what this bottle is although I was told it means "Fish Face", is from Denmark and it is 14.5% ABV.

After Greenland we sailed to Svalbard, through a gale just for variety, at about 78 degrees north lattitude. Not much to be had there either and it was all rather pricey as well. They did have the occasional polar bear though!

IMG_6612mod.jpg

From there we traveled to London where I had to the chance to pick up a few bottles I did not have easy access to in the US. They included Middleton Very Rare Irish Whiskey (thought it was the Barry Crockett Legacy pot still but it was not. That is what I get for making an impulse buy at duty free), Jade de Perique, Unicum, Zubrowka Buffalo Grass vodka, Shipwreck Apple Brandy from Somerset and Ceylon Arrack.

IMG_6801mod.jpg

We also took a one day trip through the Chunnel to Belgium. In addition to sight seeing that was mostly about beer. A visit to Cantillon Brewery was most enjoyable although this is apparently not the best time as selection was limited. I had realy hoped to get a bottle or two of the Lou Pepe Framboise for example but none was to had at the brewery or in town that I could find.

IMG_6798mod.jpg

I did manage to locate a few bottles of Westvleteren beer with its rather minimalist labeling policy so it helped to make up for the lack of options at Cantillon.

IMG_6793mod.jpgIMG_6796mod.jpg

Bringing back 14 bottles of booze in your luggage is not as easy as it might seem! They weigh around 35 pounds what with the glass and the spirits/beers itself. But they all managed to survive. Only the Irish Whiskey came home as hand carried from duty free as it was a last minute impulse buy and I managed to drop that shortly after getting on the plane as I was stowing in the overhead bin. The bottle survived but the box looked a bit like Humpty Dumpty. Some super glue has it back in one piece more less.

And then there is that whole customs nuisance. I may have forgotten to mention what I was carrying. It was a long trip and I was quite tired...


Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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God help me I bought Midori. I have an excuse. I've been asked to replicate a thai chili watermelon "martini" that was exceptionally good. The ingredients were thai-chili infused vodka, sweet and sour, Midori, and watermelon juice. It was a beautiful drink (with no hint of green so the Midori must have been really muted). I haven't quite worked out the ratios (but loving the chili-infused vodka).

But now I have a (thankfully small) bottle of Midori. Besides the above mentioned drink, is there anything good to be done with it?

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Back from the Arctic and I brought a few "nic nacs" home from various sources to remind me of the trip!

Started in Iceland where I picked up the typical local product, Brennivin schnaps, which is also known as "Black Death". I chose to pass on the classic companion dish, putrefied shark. Best drunk very cold! If at all...

I had carried a few bottles with me to keep me warm on those cold nights on the Arctic cruise. These included a bottle of Maladamado, a malbec based fortified wine from Argentina I discovered on our Antarctic cruise trip in February, a bottle of Pieau de Charentes and a single malt Irish Whiskey. None of them survived the cruise! it gets really cold in the arctic, even in the summer...

From Iceland our first stop was Greenland. Only settlement of note was Ittoqqortoormiit. Not much in the way of local spirits for purchase but the local Walmart style one stop shop had a rather eclectic, if somewhat limited, selection of spirits for sale. The supply boat only comes twice a year I am told. Not exactly a cocktail paradise I suppose.

IMG_6652_1.jpg

IMG_6639.jpg

IMG_6640.jpg

I have no idea what this bottle is although I was told it means "Fish Face", is from Denmark and it is 14.5% ABV.

. . . .

About the Fiskefjæs: if you like Jægermeister, you will appreciate it. Otherwise, you might want to save it to give as a gift to someone who does like the menthol-eucalyptus-liquorice flavour. It's kind of popular with university students, here.


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Back from the Arctic and I brought a few "nic nacs" home from various sources to remind me of the trip!

Started in Iceland where I picked up the typical local product, Brennivin schnaps, which is also known as "Black Death". I chose to pass on the classic companion dish, putrefied shark. Best drunk very cold! If at all...

I had carried a few bottles with me to keep me warm on those cold nights on the Arctic cruise. These included a bottle of Maladamado, a malbec based fortified wine from Argentina I discovered on our Antarctic cruise trip in February, a bottle of Pieau de Charentes and a single malt Irish Whiskey. None of them survived the cruise! it gets really cold in the arctic, even in the summer...

From Iceland our first stop was Greenland. Only settlement of note was Ittoqqortoormiit. Not much in the way of local spirits for purchase but the local Walmart style one stop shop had a rather eclectic, if somewhat limited, selection of spirits for sale. The supply boat only comes twice a year I am told. Not exactly a cocktail paradise I suppose.

IMG_6652_1.jpg

IMG_6639.jpg

IMG_6640.jpg

I have no idea what this bottle is although I was told it means "Fish Face", is from Denmark and it is 14.5% ABV.

. . . .

About the Fiskefjæs: if you like Jægermeister, you will appreciate it. Otherwise, you might want to save it to give as a gift to someone who does like the menthol-eucalyptus-liquorice flavour. It's kind of popular with university students, here.

Thanks for the info. I didn't buy the "Fish face", just took a picture. This little village in Greenland only gets supplies twice a year so we were told and we were asked not to buy anything and risk depleting the inventory!


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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About the Fiskefjæs: if you like Jægermeister, you will appreciate it. Otherwise, you might want to save it to give as a gift to someone who does like the menthol-eucalyptus-liquorice flavour. It's kind of popular with university students, here.

Great. Here I was laughing away at "Fish Face" liquor, "what sort of maniac would drink that?", and now I want some.

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About the Fiskefjæs: if you like Jægermeister, you will appreciate it. Otherwise, you might want to save it to give as a gift to someone who does like the menthol-eucalyptus-liquorice flavour. It's kind of popular with university students, here.

Great. Here I was laughing away at "Fish Face" liquor, "what sort of maniac would drink that?", and now I want some.

Well, it's more like 'Fish mug' (as in 'mug shot'), it's a derisive word for face.

What sort of maniac would drink that? Well, pretty much anyone who wants to get drunk fast (no drinking age in DK, although sales are restricted) is likely to reach for a shot of this, or one of the many similar products, possibly with cheap vodka. A few of these, and voila, you no longer feel too inhibited to dance/grope perfect strangers/do body sild. No, don't ask.

If you have the opportunity to buy this, I'd recommend only doing so if it costs no more than a comparable amount of Jægermeister.

ETA When I mentioned liquorice, I forgot to mention that (as is often the case in Denmark; in fact, much of Northern Europe) this is means salmiak liquorice, so it's got that ammonium chloride saltiness, too.


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Can't say that I picked these all up at once, and to be fair a couple of them were gifts, but over the last 8 weeks or so:

Amaro Meletti

Eagle Rare 10

Jefferson's Presidential Select

Salers

Hayman's Royal Dock Navy Strength

Dos Maderos 5+5

Plantation Barbados Rum

Lismore Single Malt

Tapatio Blanco

Rock Hill Farms Bourbon

The Meletti and Eagle Rare were picked to make a cocktail on the Big Bar's new fall menu, the St. Anne's Helper (say that five times fast), which is Eagle Rare/Meletti/Carpano/Forbidden Bitters. I love Manhattan variations, and it's a stand out.

I had already split a bottle with a friend of the Presidential Select the month before, but I found a bottle on sale, and I couldn't pass it up. I've been told it's basically Van Winkle 18 year. It's delicious.

The Tapatio Blanco is pretty amazing, and I don't usually sip on blanco tequila neat, but this one deserves to be sipped. It's great.

The Lismore was a surprise find. It was a gift from a friend who knows nothing about spirits, and was based on a recommendation from the guy a Trader Joe's. For a $15-$20 scotch, it's delicious - very easy drinking, and a good introduction for scotch-phobes.

The Rock Hills Farms we got to take to a BYOB pop up dinner party, where we know the chef enjoys bourbon. The dinner was delicious, so we left him the bottle.

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Walmart of all places was having a closeout sale of Cointreau for $25, so I bought two bottles.

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Picked up a bottle of Björk birch liqueur while in Iceland. Really funky stuff. Still trying to figure out what to do with it other than sip it, although it does pretty well with tonic.

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High West Campfire arrived in the Atlanta area today so I went out on a raid. Had ordered some Macvin du Jura and that was in as well. Got a couple of bottles of each.

IMG_6804mod.jpg

While there I picked up a few other odds and ends. Had debated the expensive Elijah Craig 20 year old bourbon offering but I haven't seen the much less expensive 18 year old around any more and was curious to see for myself if the 20 year old was any good.

Also the WhistlePig rye had finally managed to makes its way to Georgia and had been highly praised so I had asked the store to put one aside for me.

Knowing my penchant for oddities and things like Pineau de Charentes and the Macvin it was also suggested I try a newly arrived bottle of the La TroussePinete desert wine flavored with blackthorn. What the heck, sounds interesting.

Picked up a bottle Jack Daniels Single Barrel that had been selected by the store for those occasions when I have guests who just have to have it and to support the stores efforts in doing special bottlings. It was selected by the Spirits manager and he has done a lot to help me find and acquire unusual stuff.

Was sorely tempted by a bottle of Bushmills 21 year old Single Malt but I managed to restrain myself. Barely!

Maybe next time...

Finally, as the holidays approach it is time for pumpkin ale. Still looking for one I really like and so I decided to start with the Weyerbacher Imperial Pumpkin Ale. Made with a reasonable amount of pumpkin meat and lots of spice or so I am told. We shall see!


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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A couple of finds I bought on impulse:

- Elijah Craig 12 for $20 below the current rrp. A store was getting rid of the last couple bottles in stock.

- Ferran Adria's beer in ... maybe the last place I expected to find such a thing. Heard mixed reviews but, tbh, it was going for cheaper (again, on special--trying to get rid of it) than even some of the local 750mL bottles. So why not?


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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I like the Elijah Craig a lot, for what we pay for it here in the States ($30 or so). Haven't had it in awhile, but remember it as herby, maybe even slightly minty, and manly. Or maybe it's not manly, and I'm just a wuss.

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I like the Elijah Craig a lot, for what we pay for it here in the States ($30 or so). Haven't had it in awhile, but remember it as herby, maybe even slightly minty, and manly. Or maybe it's not manly, and I'm just a wuss.

I like it too and it's a very good deal - it's currently on sale at BevMo for $24.

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Continuing to prove that the concept of 'too sweet' is essentially incomprehensible to me (ChrisTaylor, please avert your eyes):

Toussaint.JPG

It doesn't taste remarkably of coffee, so much as plum pudding, distinct prune/raisin/candied fruit notes. Which is fine by me, to be perfectly honest.


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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