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Beet Stems and tops


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I'm roasting up some beets..

but I have these lovely stems and tops ( beautiful red color stems ) , I might just saute them , but how would you dress them ? or I Might use them in a soup . Other ideas?

If I cook the stems I'm going to lose that nice color

Paul

Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

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I always use the beet greens for Braised Beet Greens and cooked this way they do retain their lovely color.

I get both red and golden beets locally and often combine them in this dish.

I just sprinkle with sherry vinegar or balsamic or even rice vinegar and top with chopped hard boiled egg.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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For the stems, I use a technique out of Vegetables from Amaranth to Zucchini by Elizabeth Schneider. She recommends cooking chopped beet stems as a condiment (it works great for chard stems as well if you have those). Simmer a cup of water with a tablespoon each of sugar and olive oil, 3 tablespoons of cider vinegar, garlic, dried chiles, salt, coriander and fennel seeds. Add the chopped stems and simmer until tender. Reduce the liquid if necessary and cool. Serve chilled or at room temperature. You lose a little of the color, but the acid helps to retain it.

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I love using beet greens in a simple pasta, w/ garlic, red pepper, and a sprinkling of parm cheese. They make an excellent filling for tortellini, if I'm feeling ambitious. However, I've yet to find a way to keep the stem color from the greens of red beets from bleeding when cooking them.


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The problem I find is that with a bunch of beets (3 or 4, usually) there aren't enough of the greens, by the time it cooks down. So I like to combine them with red chard, myself. They are simply prepared- first brown some pancetta, or bacon, then add sliced shallots and sweat them, in goes the greens, and finish it off with salt and a splash of red wine vinegar.

This can be served by itself, or tossed with pasta, or even on a "white" pizza.

I'm not the sort to put truffle oil on everything, but recently my parents gave me a bottle from Italy that was just past the 'best-by' date- so I've been putting it on whatever I can think of. It sort of killed when I used it on the chard/beet greens the other day, better than I expected- I bet that would make a great pizza topped with some Fontina.

Edited by TongoRad (log)

aka Michael

Chi mangia bene, vive bene!

"...And bring us the finest food you've got, stuffed with the second finest."

"Excellent, sir. Lobster stuffed with tacos."

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So..

What I did: Take 3 medium leeks cut and caramelize, deglase with white wine ( I had some left over Riesling ), add in 2 T tomato paste, cook till browning, add in stems, followed by cut leafs , HM chicken stock, few grape tomatoes/ squeeze of one lemon and cooked pasta!!

5447503017_41e461c937.jpg

Looks weird but tastes pretty good and healthy for lunches this week

Its good to have Morels

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Beet greens and chard are very similar (as others have kind of alluded to). Only bad part about beet greens is rinsing them, since they're usually really sandy and gritty.

Once cleaned and trimmed, I like to microwave them (covered with plastic wrap) very briefly, and then toss in a pan with some garlic, salt and pepper, olive oil, breadcrumbs, and maybe some lemon or lemon zest.

Edited by Will (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Years ago my mother told me that the best part of making borscht from scratch was the beet greens -- and she was right! For a chilly winter night, try hot borscht -- with a boiled potato and sour cream. As for just the greens, as so many other have said, basically chard is the same as beet greens just without the bulbous root, so you can cook beet greens the same way you would chard. I love it sauteed in a bit of olive oil with some minced onion and garlic garlic and a sprinkle of grated Parmesan on top. Or when you have done sauteeing it add some diced ham or smoked turkey or diced prosciutto and chicken stock, bring to a simmer for a couple of minutes and serve with a bit of gremolata and the grated proscuitto. A quick and hearty soup.

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Years ago my mother told me that the best part of making borscht from scratch was the beet greens -- and she was right! For a chilly winter night, try hot borscht -- with a boiled potato and sour cream. As for just the greens, as so many other have said, basically chard is the same as beet greens just without the bulbous root, so you can cook beet greens the same way you would chard. I love it sauteed in a bit of olive oil with some minced onion and garlic garlic and a sprinkle of grated Parmesan on top. Or when you have done sauteeing it add some diced ham or smoked turkey or diced prosciutto and chicken stock, bring to a simmer for a couple of minutes and serve with a bit of gremolata and the grated proscuitto. A quick and hearty soup.

Nice phyllis

Its good to have Morels

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Beet greens are a favorite of mine. My Greek family sautes them in olive oil and then tosses them with olive oil, roasted diced beets (but just as good without) and lots of minced garlic. Room temp or cold.

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I invariably make farfalle with golden beets, beet greens and pine nuts whenever I am able to get some really fresh looking beets. It's just fantastic; the whole family likes it. I haven't tried it with red beets, but I suppose you could (if you're OK with pink pasta! ;)

Toast 1/3 cup pine nuts in oliver oil, set aside

Halve and slice 2 large onions; saute in olive oil until brown & tender (30+ minutes usually)

Add 3 minced garlic cloves

Scatter de-stemmed and sliced greens from 2 bunches of beets over onions; cover and cook 5 minutes

Meanwhile peel 2 bunches of golden beets and cut into 8 wedges each. Boil in salted water for 10 minutes, then set aside.

In same water, boil pasta according to directions, saving one cup of cooking liquid.

Add cooked pasta and beets to onion/greens mixture, add cooking liquid as needed to moisten, season with S&P, stir in 1/3 cup grated parmesan cheese. Top with toasted pine nuts.

Originally from Bon Appetit.

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Ever since I was a little girl one of my favorite things has been beet stem pancakes. Chop the beet stems, toss with a little more than equal amount of flour then add water until batter is about the thickness of pancake batter (batter works best when it is on the loose side). Drop spoonfuls of the batter into hot oil and fry on each side until dark brown. Salt as soon as they come out of the pan.

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