Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Pickled Onions


DaveFaris
 Share

Recommended Posts

OK. Here's a recipe I've been noodling around with for pickled onions... it's pretty much the same recipe that you'd use for bread & butter pickles, but without the cucumbers and other stuff ... just onions. I've found that frozen pearl onions work just fine for this recipe, so you can make them pretty much any time of the year. You can use fresh pearl onions, but they require peeling, and the ones I find in the produce aisle tend to be a little too large for my liking, since the syrup doesn't seem to permeate them as well.

When I make them, I put them in jars, and can them up. They make pretty good gifts, too, since the syrup ends up a yummy looking golden color. A friend told me they're excellent snack food, but I serve them just like I'd serve a relish or a chutney.

  • 1/4 c. salt

  • 2 c light brown sugar

  • 1/2 t tumeric *

  • 1/4 t cloves *

  • 1 T mustard seed *

  • 1 t celery seed *

  • 1 or 2 hot chili peppers (optional)

  • 2 c white vinegar

  • 2 lbs. fresh pearl onions, peeled, or 4 packages frozen

Combine everything in a pot except the onions and slowly bring to a boil. Simmer for 5 minutes. Strain out the spices, and return the syrup to the pot. (You can leave the spices in for more zing as they age, but I strain them out because they make eating kind of clumsy later on.) Add in the onions, and return the mixture back to just below the boiling point.

Spoon into sterilized mason jars, and add a clove or two (and a hot pepper or two, if you want), and leave a 1/4" headspace... process the jars in boiling water for 15 minutes if you want them to keep more than a week or two. If you decide to serve them up fresh, best to let them steep, covered, in the liquid for at least day or so in the fridge (I'm guessing).

* note: you can replace all of these items with a prepared pickling spice mixture if you want. Penzey's makes a really good one that I've used with good success.

Also, if you want to use fresh pearl onions, just trim off the root end, and cut a shallow x where the root was, and dunk them in boiling water for a a minute or two -- the papery skins will slip right off. I've also tried making this recipe with cider vinegar, but it added an off flavor that I didn't care for.

Edited by DaveFaris (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

similar to trotters pickled onions except he uses rice wine vinegar, ginger and uses red onions...

for a pickled onion recipe idea you could do CT's Grilled Pork Chops with Pickled Red onions and Fig Balsamic Sauce

I think Ill make that tomorrow actually! :smile: Great Dish!

Edited by awbrig (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

awbrig, I knew you were Trotter posting under another name from the get go. This seals it.

Charlie, great books, great stuff, best of intentions. Love your show. Would you do a Q&A for us?

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly.

awbrig:

charlie-portrait.jpg

Trotter:

trotter.jpg

Supposedly the picture that was to prove that CT and awbrig were two different people:

trotter.gif

You've got a bit of a way to go with your Photoshop skills there, CT. A bit grainy.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 18 years later...

Hi Guys - I want to make a quick pickled onion, small batch. (Round onion, not green onions.) Prefer not too much sweetness. I want to use these pickled onions as a garnish for salads and would prefer a chopped / small sliced texture. (Rather than large wedges or whole onions.) I do like chili peppers and hot & spicy flavors.

 

If anyone has any recipe(s) / ideas for a quick and simple pickled onion, I would appreciate hearing about it. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

Hi Guys - I want to make a quick pickled onion, small batch. (Round onion, not green onions.) Prefer not too much sweetness. I want to use these pickled onions as a garnish for salads and would prefer a chopped / small sliced texture. (Rather than large wedges or whole onions.) I do like chili peppers and hot & spicy flavors.

 

If anyone has any recipe(s) / ideas for a quick and simple pickled onion, I would appreciate hearing about it. Thanks!

I prefer a quick pickle red onion sliced relatively thin, rings separated and in half. Just salt and an acid. *I leave the additional favors to the dish itself. More flexible.  Like this as a framework. Various mild acids work.  https://www.rickbayless.com/recipe/pickled-red-onions/

Edited by heidih (log)
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you, @heidih. That's a nice, simple recipe.

 

I'm thinking about salting the onions in a colander, beforehand, to remove some of the excess moisture. I really want this to be flavorful and crunchy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

Thank you, @heidih. That's a nice, simple recipe.

 

I'm thinking about salting the onions in a colander, beforehand, to remove some of the excess moisture. I really want this to be flavorful and crunchy.

I thought with onions the pre salt was to remove intensity. The pre-salt may also soften them but I could be talking out of my a$$ since I never do it  If they are crisp kids and you use then within a week I think you'll be happy. All about balance as so many things in life are.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, MokaPot said:

I want to make a quick pickled onion, small batch. (Round onion, not green onions.) Prefer not too much sweetness. I want to use these pickled onions as a garnish for salads and would prefer a chopped / small sliced texture. (Rather than large wedges or whole onions.) I do like chili peppers and hot & spicy flavors.

 

I made this recipe once for my husband, who likes cocktail onions in his vodka martinis. I used some as a side dish also. I liked them, but I can't remember if I adjusted the sugar amount. I used white vinegar and did add a hot pepper. 

 

I made a half batch or less, didn't bother with the water-bath canning and just stored them in the fridge.

 

I don't know if you want to futz around with pearl onions, though, they can be a pain. Not sure if you would want to use this for sliced onions? 

 

https://www.bernardin.ca/recipes/en/pickled-onions.htm?Lang=EN-US

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The recipe for pickled red onions from the Zuni Café Cookbook may be sweeter than you have in mind but they are delightfully crunchy and delicious.  The recipe is a bit fussy but the results are worth the effort.  You can find the recipe online here

 

Two other recipes I like are from Josef Centeno.   This recipe with a mix of herbs is very close to the one in his first book, Bäco.  In the book, he includes one dried rosebud. 

In his other book, Amá, he has a more Mexican-style recipe that uses dried arbol chiles and dried Mexican oregano as the only herb.  Absolutely wonderful made with Rancho Gordo's Oregano Indio as the book suggests but also good with regular Mexican oregano.  I couldn't find that one online but I can give you the ingredients and paraphrase the recipe if you are interested. 

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you, @FauxPas. Both of the recipes that you and @heidih posted call for blanching the onions. I think I will blanch the onions (rather than salt them in a collander). Agree that pearl onions can be a pain. I would sub in sliced onions.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, MokaPot said:

Thank you, @blue_dolphin, I love Mexican food. If it's not too much trouble for you to list ingredients & paraphrase the recipe, please do that when you have a moment.

 

Here you go...

Pickled Oregano Onions, yield ~ 4 cups

2 medium onions

2-3 dried arbol chiles, stemmed and seeded (or more, if you like)

1.5 cups white vinegar

1.5 cups water

2 t fine sea salt

2 t sugar

1.5 T dried Mexican Oregano, preferably Oregano Indio

Slice the onions into 1/4 inch thick slices and place in a non-reactive container.  

Toast the chiles in a dry pan until fragrant

Heat the vinegar, water, salt and sugar to boiling.  Add the oregano & chiles and pour over the onions. They should be completely covered.  Allow to cool, then store in the fridge.

Wait a couple of hours before using.  

 

Amá is a great book that shows off the best of Tex-Mex cooking.  The chorizo recipe is fabulous.  I highly recommend the book.   

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From my chef school and catering days:

 

Quick Pickled Onions For Salad Topping

Take medium sized onions, peel and cut in half. Thinly slice into half moons.

Put into a bowl and just cover with apple cider vinegar then stir-in and dissolve a tablespoon of sugar (the sugar is to take any “bite” from the vinegar, not to sweeten the mixture). Once the sugar has dissolved, remove the onions and sprinkle over the salad.

 

It’s all quick and easy and tastes good, maintaining the crispness of the onion. I sometimes use this also for sprinkling on a pizza before it goes into the oven!

 

I have never tried to preserve any remaining onion (there is seldom any remaining), but presume it will store for a time in the refrigerator.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 3

Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/24/2021 at 10:11 AM, JohnT said:

From my chef school and catering days:

 

Quick Pickled Onions For Salad Topping

Take medium sized onions, peel and cut in half. Thinly slice into half moons.

Put into a bowl and just cover with apple cider vinegar then stir-in and dissolve a tablespoon of sugar (the sugar is to take any “bite” from the vinegar, not to sweeten the mixture). Once the sugar has dissolved, remove the onions and sprinkle over the salad.

 

It’s all quick and easy and tastes good, maintaining the crispness of the onion. I sometimes use this also for sprinkling on a pizza before it goes into the oven!

 

I have never tried to preserve any remaining onion (there is seldom any remaining), but presume it will store for a time in the refrigerator.

I don't know anything about pickled onions.  I came to this thread because I saw your name and wanted to say how glad I am to see you here!!!  You've been missed, I know.  

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By SobaAddict70
      I LOVE pickled ginger. In fact, in some instances, moreso than sushi or sashimi itself. When I was first introduced to sushi, it was my least favorite part of a sushi meal. Now it's the opposite.
      Besides sushi/sashimi, what other uses for pickled ginger are there? And how do you make your own? What goes in the pickling solution? Fresh pickled ginger (not premade) is undyed and a pale beige in color, whereas the premade version is a slight tawny pink.
      Any suggestions?
      Soba
    • By Smarmotron
      What sorts of mustards do you like? The type of mustard I like is pungent without a hint of sweetness (fie upon honey mustards), but not too vinegary. Inglehoffer's Stone Ground tends to be rather good, but it's got a little too much vinegar (overpowers the taste of the mustard). What sorts of mustards do you like? Any brands? Or do you make your own?
    • By Eldictator
      Any ideas on how I could put a honey centre in a jelly pastille
    • By Keith Orr
      Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce (Habenero Hot Sauce)
      I thought I'd submit my recipe which is a clone of a locally available sauce here in Portland OR called Secret Aardvark Sauce.
      Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce
      1 – 14.5 oz can of diced tomatoes or roasted tomatoes chopped - include the juice
      1 – 14.5 oz of rice wine vinegar. Use the now empty tomato can to measure
      1-1/2 cups of peeled and grated carrots (packed into the measuring cup)
      1 cup of finely diced white onion
      1/4 cup of yellow mustard
      1/3 cup of sugar
      2 teaspoons of Morton’s Kosher Salt
      1 teaspoon of black pepper
      13 small Habaneros – seeded and membranes removed. (This was 2 oz. of Habaneros before cutting off the tops and removing the seeds and membranes)
      2 teaspoons curry powder
      1 cup of water when cooking
      5 or 6 cloves of garlic - roasted if you've got it
      Put it all in the crockpot on high until everything is tender. About 3 hours  Note: I used the crockpot so I don't have to worry about scorching it while it cooks. 
      Whirl in food processor – Don’t puree until smooth – make it lightly/finely chunky.
      Makes 3 pints - To can process pint jars in a water bath canner for 15 minutes
      I've thought about making this with peaches or mangoes too, but haven't tried it yet.
       
      Edited for clarity on 11/9/2020
       
      Keywords: Hot and Spicy, Carribean, Condiment, Sauce, Easy, Food Processor
      ( RG2003 )
    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...