Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Reports on Hong Kong dining


Sinbad
 Share

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, dcarch said:

Those  high rise apartment buildings look scary. Hong Kong is typhoon country.

 

Thank you for posting your delicious trip.

 

dcarch

 

That's the view from my hotel room - I love it, far more interesting to me than the cliched harbour skyline.

I know HK typhoons well - I was a tiny kid, terrified out of my mind, during Typhoon Ellen in 1983. We lived on the Peak, right next to the Peak Tower on one of the highest points of the hills, in a massive apartment lined with floor-to-ceiling plate glass French doors. I still remember every single one of them blowing in as my family cowered in the hallways, where we'd dragged our mattresses, and the mattresses moving up and down the polished floor hallways as the building swayed. And the building had been taken over by the Japanese to use as their headquarters during the war, so it had been fortified - and was still swaying! I also remember being sheltered in a human pile by my mother and father and our maids when the air conditioner units that had been built into the windows started exploding inwards, glass flying and rain sheeting into our apartment horizontally.

 

And back onto food lest the mods get me - this is a happier trip. Today I plan to do nothing but eat roast goose, wontons, and then buy some takeaway egg tarts and eat them while riding the Star Ferry a couple of hundred times.

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I left HK 1958 - lived there from age 2 - 10 when I immigrated to Canada.

Won't make it there in the spring when we head to mainland China and to my family home in Toisan.

Will spend a few days in Guangzhou after our "set tour"

I am very much looking forward to visiting HK vicariously through you. Thank you!

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great photos, indeed!  Are those circular chopping blocks stacked in the picture with the Shek Lung Street sign?  I'd be goggling all day in a place like that, amusing the locals no end as I tried to work out what things were for.

  • Like 1

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Smithy said:

Great photos, indeed!  Are those circular chopping blocks stacked in the picture with the Shek Lung Street sign?  I'd be goggling all day in a place like that, amusing the locals no end as I tried to work out what things were for.

 

They are indeed chopping boards. Just like mine!

 

  • Like 1

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My luggage would be a fright on the way home...overloaded with gadgets for which I'd need homes....

  • Like 3

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Wayne said:

 

Great photos!

What is the dish with the razor clams? I only know of one place to purchase them fresh and their availability is sporadic.

 

 

 

It's clams steamed with garlic, chilli and vermicelli. They're delicious. I intentionally booked a hotel with kitchenettes so I could buy things from the wet markets and bring them back to cook (as between-meal snacks, don't you know!) so might do something with some garlic/black bean/razor clams.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, rarerollingobject said:

 

It's clams steamed with garlic, chilli and vermicelli. They're delicious. I intentionally booked a hotel with kitchenettes so I could buy things from the wet markets and bring them back to cook (as between-meal snacks, don't you know!) so might do something with some garlic/black bean/razor clams.

 

That is something that drives me nuts. Every night market or restaurant in southern China serves sea food in exactly the same way. Clams with chili and vermicelli, oysters with chili and vermicelli, scallops with chili and vermicelli etc. I've surprised many Chinese friends by cooking them differently (or eating them raw). They have no idea that there are alternatives.

 

In fact, it is the same with many foods. Buy a fish and if you are not careful, before you know it they will have prepared it for the only dish they know how to cook. One vendor got annoyed with me when I refused the squid she had rapidly hacked to pieces while I was counting the money to pay for them. I was planning on stuffing them. I've got them trained better now.

That said, the seafood with chili and vermin (as my daughter dubbed it) isn't so bad. Just not all the time. Black bean razor clams are great.

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, rarerollingobject said:

IMG_9266.JPG

 

 

IMG_9269.JPG

I found these two photos interesting, Regarding dim sum, I always heard you never get a 4-count of any item since the word for "Four" sounds too much like the word for "Death" in the Chinese language yet here you are with a couple dishes of four items. Is it just an old wives tale, perhaps?

  • Like 1

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Toliver said:

I found these two photos interesting, Regarding dim sum, I always heard you never get a 4-count of any item since the word for "Four" sounds too much like the word for "Death" in the Chinese language yet here you are with a couple dishes of four items. Is it just an old wives tale, perhaps?

 

There were five in each before the photos were taken. xD

 

dcarch

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No dinner as such to report from last night; it was all liquid. But after spending most of the evening  fending off strange men trying to buy me drinks and then letting them buy me drinks and then fending them off again, I woke up this morning with a raging hunger; so ate THESE pretty good dan tarts while sitting on the hotel room couch in my underwear contemplating the view, and then dragged myself to an old standby, Fu Sing in Causeway Bay.

 

Thither, my friend and I gave the old dim sum hangover-helper a fair suck of the sauce bottle (as we [sometimes, hardly ever] say in Australia):

IMG_9413.JPG

IMG_9444.JPG

IMG_9445.JPG

IMG_9446.JPG

IMG_9447.JPG

IMG_9421.JPG

IMG_9448.JPG

IMG_9449.JPG

IMG_9450.JPG

 

Then I stopped at Muji and bought myself a pack of these, because I'm wild and I cannot be tamed (or so I was informed last night.)

 

IMG_9443.JPG

 

 

 

 

Edited by rarerollingobject (log)
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Toliver said:

I found these two photos interesting, Regarding dim sum, I always heard you never get a 4-count of any item since the word for "Four" sounds too much like the word for "Death" in the Chinese language yet here you are with a couple dishes of four items. Is it just an old wives tale, perhaps?

 

It's no old wives' tale. I am surprised to see four, too.

 

In Mandarin,  4 is 四 sì while "die" is 死 sǐ, differing only in tone. In Cantonese, as spoken in Hong Kong, they are both "sei2", so the same tone.

Most Chinese people I know, and especially Hong Kongers take this quite seriously and avoid "four" in all situations from choosing a cell phone number to the number of items in your dim sum steamer..

  • Like 1

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Amazing dinner at The Chairman in Central last night, the star of the meal being a heart-stoppingly delicious steamed flowery crab with aged Shaohsing wine and chicken oil and fresh flat rice noodles..would drink sauce with spoon, and did (the waiters nodded approvingly.)

 

Other things; crispy crab meat and mushroom dumplings:

 

IMG_9487.JPG

 

Crispy Sichuan lamb belly with zucchini ribbons and coriander:

 

IMG_9488.JPG

IMG_9489.JPG

 

THAT CRAB:

 

IMG_9490.JPG

IMG_9491.JPG

 

Long-braised and then deep-fried and glazed spareribs with preserved plum and caramelised Chinkiang black vinegar:

 

IMG_9492.JPG

 

Ginger gailan:

 

IMG_9494.JPG

 

Fried rice with fresh prawns, dried prawns and prawn paste (SO UMAMI):

 

IMG_9493.JPG

 

Wolfberry ice cream and hot sweet almond milk tea:

 

IMG_9495.JPG

 

Thought all that was very good value for AUD$100 (US$80).

 

Then on the way home I swung by City Super to clear out their stocks of Lu biscuits (my friend's kid is obsessed with them, you can't get them in Australia, so I buy them for her whenever I travel):

 

IMG_9453.JPG

 

And gawk at their mind-boggling oyster selection: 

 

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is an awe-inspiring meal, rro.  I'd love to have access to food like that - and oysters like that.

  • Like 1

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Today's comestibles included a first lunch at Ho Hung Kee wonton noodle in Causeway Bay, where I had the shrimp roe noodles:

 

15123226_10154702007844122_1291090412566019232_o.jpg

 

And the wonton/shrimp dumpling soup:

 

15129664_10154702007899122_1472505797476768226_o.jpg

15039640_10154702008044122_55665800636370207_o.jpg

 

And then moved onto a second lunch at Social Place, with truffle mushroom buns:

15134399_10154702164819122_1224583597_n.jpg

 

 

Cream soup dumplings:

 

15057921_10154702164824122_1883674513_n.jpg

 

Zucchini salad with Sichuan hot and numbing dressing (pre the dressing):

 

15057808_10154702165544122_1001444712_n.jpg

 

And sweet rose buns:

15135699_10154702164829122_1583480874_n.jpg

Then a wee snack of Bee Cheng Hiang bak kwa, or Chinese honeyed pork jerky. 

15123406_10154702007684122_188698070107952587_o.jpg

 

15138416_10154702007669122_354002035504482050_o.jpg

 

And lup cheong on a stick:

 

15039470_10154702007794122_7049224845142027772_o.jpg

 

Then I decided that I'd buy myself a gift, because I've been doing it so tough on this holiday so far, so bought this beautiful platter at Shanghai Tang.

 

15110480_10154702067389122_1278930858743537775_o.jpg

15069059_10154702067394122_5107840966101982758_o.jpg

 

Two HK street scenes as bonus.

 

15056284_10154702007529122_8112194724093074643_n.jpg

15123197_10154702007549122_1965114449102512311_o.jpg

 

Anyone still reading btw, or are we over it?

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Still reading. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, I'm reading and marveling. I echo Wayne's question about the cream soup dumplings.  I'd also like to know about that zucchini salad.  It looks like one long, beautifully tangled ribbon.  How do you eat it? Final question for now: does the sweet rose bun look so creamy because it's steamed?  It looks much more like a creamy dessert than a bready substance.  What did it look like inside?

 

That platter is gorgeous. I hope it makes appearances in your later posts from home.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Oh, I'm reading and marveling. I echo Wayne's question about the cream soup dumplings.  I'd also like to know about that zucchini salad.  It looks like one long, beautifully tangled ribbon.  How do you eat it? Final question for now: does the sweet rose bun look so creamy because it's steamed?  It looks much more like a creamy dessert than a bready substance.  What did it look like inside?

 

That platter is gorgeous. I hope it makes appearances in your later posts from home.

 

The zucchini I ate like I eat noodles; slurpingly and not at all ladylike.

 

The rose bun was a standard bao dough, like you use for barbecue pork buns. A little smoother maybe, so it might've been a lower gluten starch. Filled with a faintly vomitous rose/sweet bean paste that reminded me clearly why I don't love Chinese sweets...would've rather have had another piece of pork jerky instead, tbh #porkosexual

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...