Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
gfron1

Creations from The Art of the Dessert

Recommended Posts

gfron1   

Having just reviewed The Art of the Dessert, now we can start posting our creations from this fantastic book.

I started with three, and have a couple more coming this weekend.

The first thing I made was the Peach Souffle Tartlets with Ginger Peach Ice Cream

gallery_41282_4652_7783.jpg

Its been hot here in the high dessert, so I wanted to start with anything that included ice cream. The ginger peach ice cream was really outstanding. I wish I had riper peaches for a more pronounced flavor, but it was good nonetheless. The tartlets had a splash of Grand Marnier combined with lime and peach - great combination! I also really liked the pastry crust recipe for this one - very delicate.

=====

Next, I made the Sour Cream Waffles with Avocado Ice Cream.

gallery_41282_4652_23114.jpg

Again, I was wanting something a bit cooler to counter our heat. I had trouble getting my waffles to rise and crisp which I think was a function of my waffle iron. The taste of the waffles was absolutely wonderful and became our breakfast the next morning. The ice cream was as creamy as you would expect and tasted nothing like guacamole (thank goodness!).

=====

The last dessert was terribly mis-seasoned: Fried Mocha Custard Squares.

gallery_41282_4652_327.jpg

I wanted to try things from the book that I normally would not have made, so I asked my spouse to pick a few. He made a long list, but neglected to tell me that some were for making in the fall...this was one of them. An espresso laced, cornstarch-based custard chilled, cut into squares, rolled in croissant crumbs and butter fried. I think that says it all. It was very good, and very not light and summery :raz:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pam R   

Rob - thanks for starting this topic and for the great review!

I am always on the lookout for great books (especially pastry) and this one will be ordered straight away.

Is the fried custard sitting in . . more custard? It looks luscious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tri2Cook   

Nice review. It's been a really long time since I bought any cookbooks (already have a ton both from my own collecting and inheriting my mom's large collection) and recently decided to remedy that by ordering a nice pile of books just a few days ago. This book wasn't among them so I can't play along. Maybe a "creations from..." thread using a book I have will come up one day because this sounds fun. Most of the books I ordered aren't particularly new though, just books I've been meaning to order and didn't get around to until now. I'll keep an eye on this thread, there are a few more books I want that I didn't order yet so maybe this one will make the list.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gfron1   
Rob - thanks for starting this topic and for the great review!

I am always on the lookout for great books (especially pastry) and this one will be ordered straight away. 

Is the fried custard sitting in . . more custard? It looks luscious.

The custard is sitting in a chocolate sauce which was my pre-lunch warm-up today!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jumanggy   

It hasn't yet been released at the best bookstore here in Manila... Till then, I'm excited to see what you guys are making!

W/r/t the lack of pictures... I get a little nervous because I might not be doing something right (even a picture of the end result helps), but I have to admit, when a book doesn't have pictures, it makes it even more rewarding to bake, style, and photograph a dessert you've made :smile:

Rob, that fried mocha custard square looks lethal.


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gfron1   

Here's my thought on the pictures...I love pictures because they're inspirational, but 1/3 of the book are straightforward recipes like the fried custard and waffles and ice cream. The rest of the book are desserts made up of components that we're all familiar with. So even as I'm creating the desserts, since I'm using familiar components (genoise, buttercream frosting, custards, etc), I'm going to assemble them however I'm most inclined. None of the desserts above had pics and they turned out yummy enough for me to eat. So don't let that stop you when the book comes in - its well worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gfron1   

Caramel Nut Cake

gallery_41282_4652_7592.jpg

I need to work on my ganache coating, and I burnt my nuts...rough day! But, this is again super. In fact, I'm kind of sick to my stomach right now because I ate so much of the caramel sauce and caramel buttercream - both were absolutely super.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gfron1   

Tonight following a huge mound of baby back ribs we had Sweet Corn Brulee, and at the recipes suggestion I topped it with a not too sharp aged Irish cheddar.

gallery_41282_4652_23045.jpg

gallery_41282_4652_17948.jpg

Amernick says this dessert is "as good as anything I've ever eaten." I think I agree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AnnaC   

That corn brulee topped with the cheddar looks amazing, and for some reason seems like it would be the perfect snack post-midnight here on the east-coast! What was the texture of the brulee like? What made you decide to go with cubes of cheese versus, say, shavings?

signing off from the land of the deeply-jealous-of-that-dessert-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gfron1   
That corn brulee topped with the cheddar looks amazing, and for some reason seems like it would be the perfect snack post-midnight here on the east-coast!  What was the texture of the brulee like?  What made you decide to go with cubes of cheese versus, say, shavings?

signing off from the land of the deeply-jealous-of-that-dessert-

I had leftover batter that I used again last night. Of course it fell b/c the rising had already happened in storage, but the taste was just as good. The texture...well, if a bowl of good grits made love to a parfait dish of fresh cooked pudding, and honeymooned in a warm hot tub for the evening...that would be the texture. :raz:

As for the cubes v. shaving. I thought about shaving and grating, both of which I thought would make the mind think of a savory dish. The cubes were less than a 1/4" square, and I thought it played better on the rounded ramekin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gfron1   

I haven't made anything in over a week because temps have been near 100 for 2 weeks. But its starting to cool off up here in the mountains and I'm baking again. I wanted to make some low-heat recipes, so I'm doing tarts.

Mont Blanc - chestnut and rum!

gallery_41282_4652_4635.jpg

gallery_41282_4652_14829.jpg

I had to use the Faugier canned chestnut variation for these.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mottmott   
(I'm feeling kinda lonely in this topic  :unsure: )

Tonight was the Orange Frangiapane Tart.  This is an almond cream filling with Grand Marnier, glazed with apricot.  I tried two different decorations on top and prefer the almonds.

gallery_41282_4652_7621.jpggallery_41282_4652_11142.jpg

Beautiful. Don't give up. I've ordered the book from the library (to look it over carefully before buying it).

I really like cakes where nuts take the place of all or part of the flour. Does she have some of those? I always feel less guilty if I'm getting my Omega-3's while I indulge my sweet tooth.


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tsquare   

I'm enjoying watching. It's summer, so heating up the house isn't ideal, plus we are trying to keep the sweets to a minimum. Perhaps traffic on this thread will increase in the fall. Now, with stone fruit season almost here, what is in the book in that area?

Bake another for me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Caramel Nut Cake

gallery_41282_4652_7592.jpg

I need to work on my ganache coating, and I burnt my nuts...rough day!  But, this is again super.  In fact, I'm kind of sick to my stomach right now because I ate so much of the caramel sauce and caramel buttercream - both were absolutely super.

This picture keeps catching my eye. I think I'm going to have to make it very soon :).


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hadn't realized that anyone had responded to tthe recipe page. I'm impressed at all the desserts that have been made. If I can answer any questions or help someone in any way, don't hesitate to ask. Hope to hear from you.

Thanks,

Ann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jumanggy   

I'm not a big fan of coffee but that looks really enticing! The book has many variations for pastry cream? (The book's not out here yet. Sigh!)


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mottmott   

I had a problem with The Turkish Rice and Rose Water Pudding. I hope Ann will have the answer to the problem I had.

As I'm still in recovery mode from a hip operation, I thought I'd treat myself to the comfort of the Turkish Rice and Rose Water Pudding. And it looked less demanding than most other recipes, not calling for lifting hot things from the oven. As I have a stool in the kitchen, hanging around to stir from time to time did not present a problem

I followed the recipe exactly, using the half and half for the Turkish Rice recipe. To my surprise it turned out to be a liquidy gruel, not "creamy and loose." The Rose-Water Pudding didn't "gel" completely, but was acceptably thinckened. I like rosewater flavor, so the dessert's flavor was agreeably subtle and suited what I was looking for in my present frame of mind.

The problem was the texture/consistency. I assume there is supposed to be some sort of pleasant interplay between the texture of the two elements.

Two possiblilities:

1. There's a misprint. The recipe as written calls for only 1/3 cup basmati rice to 2 quarts of half and half. This strikes me as a strange ratio for a rice pudding, but I tend to follow a recipe exactly the first time.

2. Sometimes grains and beans behave weirdly if they are too old.


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Granary pancakes with bilberry mousse
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for "slimmed down" pancakes. Luckily, I don't have any problems with fruit in my children's diet; they like all kinds of fruit. But I know that for other parents pancakes could be the best way to sneak some vitamins into their food.

      I found the recipe for the pancakes at Polish "wegepedia.pl", and it appealed to me instantly because of the easy and basic preparation and the yummy look of the pancakes.

      Ingredients:
      200g of granary flour
      one teaspoon and a half of baking powder
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 flat teaspoon of cinnamon
      300ml of vegetable milk
      Other ingredients
      100g of bilberries
      30ml of water
      3 dates

      Mix the sugar, flour, baking powder and cinnamon in a bowl. Pour the milk in and stir until you make a smooth dough. Put small portions of the dough into a pan (with a non-stick surface) and fry on both sides until the pancakes are golden. If you have another pan, use a bit of oil for frying. Use a handful of bilberries for decoration. Blend the rest of the clean fruit with the dates and water. Leave in the fridge for a while. Decorate the hot pancakes with the fruit mousse and bilberries. Serve at once.
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Millet groats cookies with tahini and chocolate.
       
      This time I prepared millet groats cookies with tahini and chocolate. They are not so sweet, have lots of sesame seeds and are crunchy with a beautiful, homely smell.

      Ingredients (30 cookies)
      3 tablespoons of tahini
      120g of brown sugar
      100g of butter
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      a pinch of salt
      1 egg
      130g of millet groats flakes
      75g of flour
      ½ teaspoon of baking powder
      ½ of baking soda
      100g of dark chocolate

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Cover a baking sheet with some baking paper.
      Pulp the butter with the brown sugar, vanilla sugar and salt to make a fluffy mass. Pulping constantly, add the tahini and then the egg. Add the flour, baking soda, baking powder and millet groats flakes. Break up the chocolate and add it to the dough. Mix it in. Make little balls from the mixture, around the size of walnuts. Put them on the baking sheet. Keep the cookies separate. Bake for 15-17 minutes. Leave to cool down.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By Bijay@Sugar Daddy Bakes
      I am a Baker and Cake Decorator in India. India has a huge Vegetarian Population that does not even eat eggs/gelatin. So I am constantly looking at finding vegetarian options.
       
      Issue at Hand:
      Regular Butter Cream - American Butter Cream ( Icing Sugar 10X + Butter + Milk/Lemon Juice / Cream) is an option ..and a lot of decorators use this as it sets hard, and they also add shortening into it ..and I am like , Nope I can't eat that , much less serve it. Its too Sweet /Gritty and Crusts and just tasteless. It has also made sure that people in my country to completely throw out any butter cream cake . You say Butter Cream and they say - too Sweet/gritty.
      I have been successful in the last two years to break that impression by making European Meringue based butter cream - I love Swiss Meringue Butter Cream . It is smooth, just sweet enough , takes colour well, pipes well , and is mostly temperature stable. But I can't serve it to people who don't eat eggs.
      I have so far been making a substitute - Ermine/Rue/Cooked Butter Cream - a Flour + Milk+ Sugar custard (AKA Pastry Cream minus the eggs) and whipping butter into it. It tastes good - people like it ..nut its a misery to work with - will not hold shape , will not colour well , and most of all weeps and weeps some more when we chill the cakes.
       
      So I am looking for suggestions on finding a starch that will not weep  when frozen in a custard? And my second approach is to move to Aqua Faba to build the meringue and make SMBC. The starch custard option is easy and economical and does not leave me with mountains of Chickpeas .
       
      would  love to hear thoughts . 
       
      Thanks  
    • By Kasia
      Feather-light chocolate whip with aquafaba
       
      There wouldn't be anything special in this dessert if it wasn't for its main ingredient. It was aquafaba - i.e. the liquid which is left after straining chickpeas from a tin. Up to now I have poured it away. From today I will never make this mistake. Joël Roessel, a French chef, was the discoverer of aquafaba. He wanted an alternative to eggs when preparing meringues.

      Protein and starch are the only ingredients of aquafaba. It doesn't have any other additives. Cold aquafaba can be whisked like an egg white. Next time I will try to prepare some meringues with aquafaba, but now I would like to share with you the recipe for an extremely simple chocolate whip. I served it with the sub acid from an apricot mousse. My children were delighted, and so were we.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      200ml of aquafaba (from one tin of chickpeas)
      2 teaspoons of caster sugar
      150g of dark chocolate
      6 apricots
      2 tablespoons of lemon juice
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie and leave it to cool down a little. Whip the aquafaba in a very clean glass bowl. Add the sugar spoon by spoon and whip constantly until the foam is stiff and glossy. Add the chocolate and stir thoroughly but gently. Put the chocolate whip into some small bowls and leave in the fridge for 3-4 hours. Wash the apricots and remove the stones. Put them into a pan with the lemon juice and sugar. Boil until the apricots are soft and the juice has evaporated a bit. Blend the fruit. Leave to cool down. Put the apricots onto the chocolate whip and decorate with some peppermint leaves.
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Afternoon tea with finger biscuits.
       
      With my children in mind I prepared an extremely simple dessert using natural yoghurt and biscuits as basic ingredients. It was supposed to be for children. By default, though, I prepared a bit more and we were all able to relish it.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      400g of natural yoghurt
      200g of finger biscuit
      200g of raspberries
      2 teaspoons of caster sugar

      Put aside a few nice raspberries and four finger biscuits. Crush the rest of the raspberries with a fork and mix them with the caster sugar. Crush the finger biscuits and blend them with the natural yoghurt. Put the raspberry mousse and then the biscuit mixture into a cup. Decorate the top of the dessert with the raspberries and peppermint leaves.
       
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×