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Show Us Your Ladles!


Chris Amirault
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After spending far too much time cursing a drippy Oxo Good Grips nylon ladle, I set out to find a good, cheap ladle to complement my go-to Chinese wok ladle. After months of searching, I found this 1/2 cup baby at an area thift store (Savers, for those who care):

gallery_19804_437_20328.jpg

It's a remarkable thing, simple but very well designed. The balance is perfect, and the indentations on the solid metal handle --

gallery_19804_437_23293.jpg

-- make for easy gripping and prevent the ladle from sliding into the pan. And who's the genius behind this marvel?

gallery_19804_437_20594.jpg

This got me to thinking about ladles in general, a tool that is one of the workhorses in my kitchen, especially as fall and winter approach. What do you look for? What are your favorites? Let's see them ladles, folks!

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Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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gallery_34671_2649_40514.jpg

Some of my ladles.

gallery_34671_2649_83562.jpg

My favorite ladle for filling chocolate molds. Just the right size, angle is perfect, found it at the reuse centre for 25 cents.

gallery_34671_2649_68510.jpg

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I look for handle length, weight, and ease of use ...

This is my newest purchase and I use it whenever I have soup worthy of it ... didn't realize that there are so many types of ladles ... small ones for gravy, some for batter, some for sauces, plastic for punch, and some in porcelain ...

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an old and well beloved soup ladle from my grandmother .. and newer ladle

gallery_10011_1589_9874.jpg

my favorite ladle as of today ... heavy and well balanced ...

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I really like that angle, Kerry. Looks about 150 degrees or so; that Betty Crocker one above is about 120 degrees, which is a tad too acute at times.

ETA: Mel, that last one seems good and solid -- but does the heavy handle make the ladle flip out of smaller pots?

Edited by chrisamirault (log)

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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ETA: Mel, that last one seems good and solid -- but does the heavy handle make the ladle flip out of smaller pots?

I don't use it to do anything but serve so my hand is on the handle for that purpose primarily .. it also depends as well on the depth of the soup pot .. to date, it has yet to flip out by itself .. nothing flips out in this house, including the cook ... :wink:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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gallery_22732_1836_53136.jpg

I didn't realize I had this many ladles until I started collecting them for the photo. From top to bottom: First is a ladle we received from a French friend who noticed I had a lot of copper pots and gave me this to match. It is tin-lined and very heavy. I mainly just have it hanging up for display. Next is a little ceramic ladle that goes with my gravy boat. It's just too cute but nearly worthless. The aluminum ladle belonged to my DH's grandmother, and we use it quite a bit. It provides very generous portions of soups and stews. The first stainless one is the one I use most often, although I would like the handle to be more ergonomic. The other stainless one just takes up drawer space - I should give it away since it is never used. I thought I would use the small one at the bottom for sauces and such but haven't used it much yet. The black one at the left I got when I had a nonstick stockpot. I still use it occasionally because the handle is comfortable and because it pours well, but it isn't very attractive.

Just realized I forgot the large ceramic ladle that goes with my soup tureen, and the ladle that goes with the sterling! Oh well, I'm too lazy to dig them out, which goes to show you how often I use those.

Edit to put in the correct photo.

Edited by Darcie B (log)
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  • 7 years later...

After spending far too much time cursing a drippy Oxo Good Grips nylon ladle, I set out to find a good, cheap ladle to complement my go-to Chinese wok ladle. After months of searching, I found this 1/2 cup baby at an area thift store (Savers, for those who care):

gallery_19804_437_20328.jpg

It's a remarkable thing, simple but very well designed. The balance is perfect, and the indentations on the solid metal handle --

gallery_19804_437_23293.jpg

-- make for easy gripping and prevent the ladle from sliding into the pan. And who's the genius behind this marvel?

gallery_19804_437_20594.jpg

This got me to thinking about ladles in general, a tool that is one of the workhorses in my kitchen, especially as fall and winter approach. What do you look for? What are your favorites? Let's see them ladles, folks!

I, too, have a ladle that seems identical, although it does not carry the Betty Crocker logo.

I discovered this thread because I'm looking for another ladle, this time in a material that won't scratch in interior of my pots, maybe nylon? What else is there? I'm not interested in plastic. Checked equipment reviews at Cook's Illustrated and ATK, and only found stainless steel ladles reviewed. Any one to definitely avoid? Any recommendations?

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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I discovered this thread because I'm looking for another ladle, this time in a material that won't scratch in interior of my pots, maybe nylon? What else is there? I'm not interested in plastic. Checked equipment reviews at Cook's Illustrated and ATK, and only found stainless steel ladles reviewed. Any one to definitely avoid? Any recommendations?

If you're afraid that metal will scratch your pots, and you don't want plastic (nylon is a plastic, btw), then all that's left is wood (or bamboo, which I guess technically isn't wood), right?

Dave Scantland
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Eat more chicken skin.

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I discovered this thread because I'm looking for another ladle, this time in a material that won't scratch in interior of my pots, maybe nylon? What else is there? I'm not interested in plastic. Checked equipment reviews at Cook's Illustrated and ATK, and only found stainless steel ladles reviewed. Any one to definitely avoid? Any recommendations?

If you're afraid that metal will scratch your pots, and you don't want plastic (nylon is a plastic, btw), then all that's left is wood (or bamboo, which I guess technically isn't wood), right?

Well, I guess I'm ignorant about some materials. So, let me refine my request: I'd like a recommendation for a nylon ladle.

 ... Shel


 

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I discovered this thread because I'm looking for another ladle, this time in a material that won't scratch in interior of my pots, maybe nylon? What else is there? I'm not interested in plastic. Checked equipment reviews at Cook's Illustrated and ATK, and only found stainless steel ladles reviewed. Any one to definitely avoid? Any recommendations?

If you're afraid that metal will scratch your pots, and you don't want plastic (nylon is a plastic, btw), then all that's left is wood (or bamboo, which I guess technically isn't wood), right?

Well, I guess I'm ignorant about some materials. So, let me refine my request: I'd like a recommendation for a nylon ladle.

Is there a reason you'd like to avoid the rest of the plastics category with the exception of nylon?

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Is there a reason you'd like to avoid the rest of the plastics category with the exception of nylon?

Yes. It's my understanding that nylon will handle greater heat without melting or deforming. I've seen some plastic spatulas melt and deform when being used in a skillet, and saw some videos from ATK showing plastic utensils of this type melt. In addition, I'm concerned about chemicals in certain plastics leaching into the food, and my feeling is that nylon is more inert in that regard. Plus, I prefer the way nylon feels in my hand compared to other plastics that I've used and handled. If there are other plastics that fit my preferences, I'd be happy to consider them, but, as noted earlier, plastic engineering is not my forte, and until just now didn't even know that nylon is a plastic. I'm certainly amenable to learning.

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 ... Shel


 

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How do you feel about silicone? It has higher heat resistance than nylon.

I'd like to see data on leaching from utensils made of plastic. I'm not saying it doesn't happen -- it's pretty clear that some plastic wraps are susceptible under certain conditions -- but I'd like to base a decision on more than feelings.

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Dave Scantland
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dscantland@eGstaff.org
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Eat more chicken skin.

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Here are mine. From left to right: a cheapo s/s with red plastic handle that came free with a package of ramen noodles; a shallow s/s from India; a deep nylon one; my two cake icing/sauce dosing ladles, both s/s, with smaller bowl capacities.

I use the nylon one with nonstick pots and where I need a big ladle capacity. It doesn't scratch, and I've used it in high-temperature sugar solutions without any sort of weirdness or warping.

Ladles.jpg

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Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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How do you feel about silicone? It has higher heat resistance than nylon.

I'd like to see data on leaching from utensils made of plastic. I'm not saying it doesn't happen -- it's pretty clear that some plastic wraps are susceptible under certain conditions -- but I'd like to base a decision on more than feelings.

I suppose silicone would be acceptable. I didn't mention it because all the silicone items I've seen have been soft and sort of floppy, and it didn't seem like the material would make a good ladle.

My feelings about plastic are based on several articles I read over the course of more than a year, so while they are not scientific papers they are from reputable sources, and have given me concern. Why take a chance if there are alternatives that are not questionable.

 ... Shel


 

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I was making coconut ice cream using fresh coconuts.

I decided I shouldn't waste the shell.

So I made the shell into ladles.

dcarch

coconutopening3.jpg

coconutladdle.jpg

coconutladdle2.jpg

How did you attach the handles? Those are quite spiffy by the way!

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I have a Calphalon nylon ladle that came with a pot that someone gave me.

I also have a Farberware ladle that I bought at the kitchen outlet store in the "factory-outlet mall" but the same one is on Amazon.

I use them both interchangeably and I just noticed that the Calphalon is also on Amazon.

And come to think of it, I also have others from that same "collection" - the fork, spatula, spoon, big pancake turner and the spaghetti tool. My friend must have given me all of them because I don't recall buying them and that pot is the only only one I have of that particular Calphalon line.

They are both rigid and work well with thich, heavy stews - the handles are long enough for using in deep pots (16 quart easy) and for stirring and serving thick chili in my big electric roaster.

Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I also have a Farberware ladle that I bought at the kitchen outlet store in the "factory-outlet mall" but the same one is on Amazon.

I was looking at that one and wondering about the shape. Does it work well for you? Reviews indicate it's big and might not fit into a utensil crock. What's been your experience with the size? I like that it's one piece, and I also like that it has a large capacity.

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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How do you feel about silicone? It has higher heat resistance than nylon.

I'd like to see data on leaching from utensils made of plastic. I'm not saying it doesn't happen -- it's pretty clear that some plastic wraps are susceptible under certain conditions -- but I'd like to base a decision on more than feelings.

I suppose silicone would be acceptable. I didn't mention it because all the silicone items I've seen have been soft and sort of floppy, and it didn't seem like the material would make a good ladle.

My feelings about plastic are based on several articles I read over the course of more than a year, so while they are not scientific papers they are from reputable sources, and have given me concern. Why take a chance if there are alternatives that are not questionable.

One caveat. I had a steel ladle with a silicone bowl - made by All-Clad and it did not hold up. It was supposed to be Stainless but developed rust around the junction where the silicone bowl part attached to the shaft and when I tried to clean it, the coating peeled away and there was rust underneath the silicone.

I threw it away. It was the only All-Clad item I ever had to discard. I don't know if they still make them - I think I got it at Williams-Sonoma or Sur La Table.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I also have a Farberware ladle that I bought at the kitchen outlet store in the "factory-outlet mall" but the same one is on Amazon.

I was looking at that one and wondering about the shape. Does it work well for you? Reviews indicate it's big and might not fit into a utensil crock. What's been your experience with the size? I like that it's one piece, and I also like that it has a large capacity.

I've got "several" utensil crocks and it would fit well in any of the larger ceramic or stainless ones, but I have this one hanging with others of my larger utensils that have the fatter handles (which are easier for me to hold, with my arthritic hands).

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I have various melamine spoons and such that I use for serving up out of pots. Melamine is not good for high heat so I don't cook with them. If you can find a ladle made out of melamine I would go for it. These items have stiffness like a good steel ladle and they clean up easily.

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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  • 2 weeks later...

I also have a Farberware ladle that I bought at the kitchen outlet store in the "factory-outlet mall" but the same one is on Amazon.

I took delivery of the Farberware ladle today, just in time for making a big batch of curried lentil and kale soup. I-2-3 Bada Bing! The pot was scooped out and the storage containers filled. The size and shape are just about ideal for some of the soups (and, I suppose, stews) that I frequently make.

I can see where it may be a bit big or unwieldy for some drawers or situations, but it is a good fit here. Thanks!

Interesting - the price on Amazon now is almost twice what I paid for mine just a few days ago, and more expensive that a several other sites.

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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I was making coconut ice cream using fresh coconuts.

I decided I shouldn't waste the shell.

So I made the shell into ladles.

dcarch

How did you attach the handles? Those are quite spiffy by the way!

Thanks.

I have some high temperature epoxy. It seems to have worked for a few years.

dcarch

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