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Hummus: Additives, Techniques, Recipes


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I was glad to encounter this topic because I have long had a question about tahini that one of you may be able to answer.  Usually when I buy tahini at the grocery it appears to be in a "raw" state.  Very pale.  But once, many years ago, I was able to purchase something called "Toasted Tahini".  It was darker in color and had a slightly smoky taste.  I must confess I thought it improved the taste of my hummus (though not necessarily making it more authentic). Since then, I have wondered which kind of tahini is actually called for in hummus recipes.  Thanks for all the great recipes...can't wait to try them!

Very interesting. I've never seen the "toasted tahini" you are talking about. The only Tahini I've seen in Lebanon and here in the US is the "raw" Tahini and this is what is called for in the Humus recipes. I would certainly love to try the toasted one if I do find it though.

FM

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I make my hummus with regular tahini; however, I've been to a little restaurant in Oak Park, IL that makes fabulously addictive "hummus" that doesn't taste like it has tahini. It definitely tastes more like roasted almonds and the plate was decorated with almond slivers. It's on my long list of things I want to duplicate at home. It's been almost a year since I last tried this restaurant's hummus, but I still remember the wonderful flavour.

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Very interesting. I've never seen the "toasted tahini" you are talking about. The only Tahini I've seen in Lebanon and here in the US is the "raw" Tahini and this is what is called for in the Humus recipes. I would certainly love to try the toasted one if I do find it though.

As mentioned earlier on this thread, there's roasted/toasted tahini at Whole Foods.

Edit:

Boaziko, how do you feel about the importation of Nablus made Tahini into the USA? :wink:

Edited by Orik (log)
M
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IrishCream:

""Toasted Tahini". It was darker in color and had a slightly smoky taste"

Maybe it is what we call here "BlacK Tahini' and is probably made from black seeds same size as seaseame, known in Israel as Ketzach. (damascena nigella).

La Niña:

I went there in the past, but never on a regular basis. It is all right but not the utmost.

Schonat hatikva has some touristy Folklore flair (I hope this is understandable) which made me go elsewhere in recent years.).

Edited by boaziko (log)

"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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  • 2 months later...

I know this post hasn't been active for a while, but...

The recipe that Rachel has suggested above is actually great as a sauce for grilled seafood. The sauce is called "Taratour" and has nothing to do with chick-peas or hummus; it's a sauce that is used in falafels, shawarma or whole grilled fish. The consistency tends to be heavier for falafel and shawarma whereas it could be lighter and more lemony for fish. [You could also add finely chopped parsley to it too]

"I hate people who are not serious about their meals." Oscar Wilde

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  • 2 months later...

all this with or without tehina hummus made me think of the worst hummus atrocity I ever saw committed--a neighbor in college, a very nice hippie with a thick jersey accent was leaving his apt with a bowl that reeked of garlic. He told me he was on is way to a Dead show.and he was bringing hummus he made along for the ride. He opened the bowl, it was bright orange and, mind you I love garlic, but a super pungent garlic smell. He told me that the orange stuff was CARRROTS!. I decided it was no time to argue with him about hummus and left him on his merry way. all I could think about that day was a bunch of people stuck in a hot car with that faux hummus reeking from NC to NY!

-----------------

AMUSE ME

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all this with or without tehina hummus made me think of the worst hummus atrocity I ever saw committed--a neighbor in college, a very nice hippie with a thick jersey accent was leaving his apt with a bowl that reeked of garlic. He told me he was on is way to a Dead show.and he was bringing hummus he made along for the ride. He opened the bowl, it was bright orange and, mind you I love garlic, but a super pungent garlic smell.  He told me that the orange stuff was CARRROTS!. I decided it was no time to argue with him about hummus and left him on his merry way. all I could think about that day was a bunch of people stuck in a hot car with that faux hummus reeking from NC to NY!

An Atrocity it is!!!!

Did that guys "Hummus" have any hummus in it, I wonder??? Hummus means Chickpeas in Arabic.

FM

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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My own special trick for creating lightness of texture in my hummus or baba ghanoush is to add a few heaping tablespoons of unflavored low-fat or non-fat yogurt to the food processor for the last go-'round. Seems to create a much fluffier textured end result without changing the taste.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

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Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I know what this is going to do to the purist contingent but bear with me...it's not my recipe anyways.

Tsilya's Hummus...(She's from Georgia in The Ukraine)

Garbanzos...soaked overnight

Tahini...a little less than called for

Plenty-o-garlic

Cumin Seed Ground

Parsley Fresh

Lemon Juice Fresh

and....

Uh.....

Heavy Duty Mayonnaise...It smoothes it out....I can feel the rotten tomatoes flying by my head. And sometimes I add just a touch of sesame oil. Try it before you commit to murder.

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I know what this is going to do to the purist contingent but bear with me...

Great. Now, Spencer is going avant-garde on us. What's next? FG going vegan?

Don't tell Achatz that you're calling the addition of Sysco double heavy duty mayo avant garde....My whole argument will be shot to shit.

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I know what this is going to do to the purist contingent but bear with me...it's not my recipe anyways. 

Tsilya's Hummus...(She's from Georgia in The Ukraine)

Garbanzos...soaked overnight

Tahini...a little less than called for

Plenty-o-garlic

Cumin Seed Ground

Parsley Fresh

Lemon Juice Fresh

and....

Uh.....

Heavy Duty Mayonnaise...It smoothes it out....I can feel the rotten tomatoes flying by my head.  And sometimes I add just a touch of sesame oil.  Try it before you commit to murder.

sounds perfect!

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Here's the first of this thread's recipe's. Hummus.

I'm just on my way out to catch my flight to Montreal, but I'll get the rest of them when I get back on Sunday! (If anyone else does so, please let me know, so I don't duplicate :biggrin: ) Thanks!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I often roast a small amount of sesame seeds and add them to the mix. It gives the hummus a toasty flavour.

I recently made tahina with loads of chopped parsley (similar to Boaziko's recipe) and it took me back to a restaurant in East Jerusalem called The Dolphin which I have an idea no longer exists. But back in the seventies when I lived there they used to serve the most wonderful tahina dip.

I am now living on the other side of the world, in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic where there is a significant Middle Eastern community and several restaurants and specialist food shops. There is also an excellent Israeli-run falafel bar called S-bar.

Aunt Ilana

Edited by Auntilana (log)
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  • 1 month later...
I often roast a small amount of sesame seeds and add them to the mix. It gives the hummus a toasty flavour.

I recently made tahina with loads of chopped parsley (similar to Boaziko's recipe) and it took me back to a restaurant in East Jerusalem called The Dolphin which I have an idea no longer exists. But back in the seventies when I lived there they used to serve the most wonderful tahina dip.

I am now living on the other side of the world, in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic where there is a significant Middle Eastern community and several restaurants and specialist food shops. There is also an excellent Israeli-run falafel bar called S-bar.

Aunt Ilana

Aunt Ilana, can you share your recipe for hummus with us? Please... :smile:

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  • 3 weeks later...
I make my hummus with regular tahini; however, I've been to a little restaurant in Oak Park, IL that makes fabulously addictive "hummus" that doesn't taste like it has tahini. It definitely tastes more like roasted almonds and the plate was decorated with almond slivers. It's on my long list of things I want to duplicate at home. It's been almost a year since I last tried this restaurant's hummus, but I still remember the wonderful flavour.

I know it's not authentic but I have some almond butter in my fridge and I'm tempted to try it instead of tehini in my next Huumus. Anyone ever try it. What do you think? As my contribution to the discussion I'll add the following as a variation for those who like to experiment a little:

I often add additional ingredients such as jalapeno, garlic, sun dried tomato etc. For a mellower garlic or jalapeno flavor roast them first. I often use a mix of both roasted and raw for a bit more complexity.

I add olive oil to both the mix and float a bit on the top of the hummus,finishing with a sprinkle of kosher salt and a few sprigs of parsley, mint or cilantro.

As a time saver I usually use a food processor and add the garlic, jalapeno etc first and let the machine do the work of mincing/chopping.

My hummos 'secret' is to drop a couple of ice cubes into mix during the last minute or two of blending. The ice cubes, as they are breaking up, aid in whipping the mix and the water adds volume. This results in a lighter

textured hummus.

Variation:

The variation I've been using the last few years is both roasted and fresh garlic, roasted and fresh jalapeno (and/or) serranro in the mix and, also, toasted cumin seed and black peppercorns, ground, then mixed with fresh ground chili flakes (cayenne) and kosher salt.

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  • 9 months later...

I'm catering a small party and want to make as much the day before as possible without sacrificing quality. I've never used the technique of blanching garlic to smooth out the raw taste but it seems appropriate in the case of day before Hummus as I can't stand that "old" garlic taste.

Has anyone tried this with Hummus? and I'd like any comments on blanching garlic in general.

Otherwise I'll make it the same day.

Thanks!

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