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Suvir Saran

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  1. Suvir Saran

    Amma

    Pan, again, thanks.
  2. Suvir Saran

    Amma

    Pan, many thanks from Anju Sharma, Hemant, Dev Sharma, Bikky and our staff and certainly myself. Your words are so very kind and generous. It makes working seem worthwhile and poetic. I am glad your meal this time was at par with your last visit. Even more wonderful is the fact you came again. If I lived downtown, I would not often make a trek to the UES for a meal. You really do encourage us to keep up our work. And I wanted you to know customers such as yourself, make our day seem easy and wonderful. I was sad to have missed the chance to meet Katie. I had my father, who is finally getting
  3. Vikram, maybe you can expound more on your Hummus in the Middle East and Africa forum? Please... coming from you, it would make for a great new way of entertaining this dish that has found a comfortable place in new American cookery.
  4. Mongo and Vikram, you have covered it all and very well. And exactly as Vikram points out, there are those masalas which cannot really be replicated very well at least by the home chef that I have met.... Bottle Masala is never the same as I used to get from friends in Bombay. rks seems to be perhaps equiring about a commercial opportunity... and in that case, again, it depends on what market you are aiming your restaurant for, what menu you are working with and what dishes you are looking for using these products in. Bedekar was a favorite for me everytime I found myself very late into the ni
  5. Suvir will clarify this if he ever gets round to checking this forum again , but I'm guessing its the Hardwar/Benaras pandit tradition. So its quite likely that Suvir's family can trace its roots back to the 15th century through this connection, Vikram i didn't mean to imply that i was sceptical of suvir's genealogical claim--i was actually impressed. suvir, by the way, is still reading this forum--he dropped me a note last night on this very subject. now, if we can only get him to post again. amma must be keeping him very busy. now, what he should do is set up a computer in their lobby
  6. Basic Garam Masala 2 cinnamon sticks 4 bay leaves 1-1/2 oz cumin seeds 1-1/2 oz coriander seeds 3/4 oz green or black cardamom seeds 3/4 oz black peppercorns 1/2 oz cloves 1/2 oz mace Break the cinnamon sticks into pieces. Add the bay leaves. Heat a heavy frying pan and after 2 minutes put in the whole spices. Dry roast over a medium flame till color darkens, stirring or shaking the pan frequently to prevent burning. Place the contents on a cold platter to cool, then grind and blend with mace powder. Store in an airtight container Keywords: Indian ( RG890 )
  7. Basic Garam Masala 2 cinnamon sticks 4 bay leaves 1-1/2 oz cumin seeds 1-1/2 oz coriander seeds 3/4 oz green or black cardamom seeds 3/4 oz black peppercorns 1/2 oz cloves 1/2 oz mace Break the cinnamon sticks into pieces. Add the bay leaves. Heat a heavy frying pan and after 2 minutes put in the whole spices. Dry roast over a medium flame till color darkens, stirring or shaking the pan frequently to prevent burning. Place the contents on a cold platter to cool, then grind and blend with mace powder. Store in an airtight container Keywords: Indian ( RG890 )
  8. Matar Paneer ( Indian Cheese ) 10 c whole milk 1/2 c buttermilk / yogurt (more maybe needed, so keep some extra In a large heavy bottomed pan, bring the milk to a boil over medium heat. Stir often to ensure that the milk is not sticking to the bottom of the pan. When milk starts to boil, lower heat and add the buttermilk and stir until the milk starts to separate into curds. Remove from heat as soon as this happens. You can even add a few ice cubes to the curd-whey mix. The heat will make the protein tougher. Hence the need to expose the cheese to as little heat as possible. If the curds a
  9. Matar Paneer ( Indian Cheese ) 10 c whole milk 1/2 c buttermilk / yogurt (more maybe needed, so keep some extra In a large heavy bottomed pan, bring the milk to a boil over medium heat. Stir often to ensure that the milk is not sticking to the bottom of the pan. When milk starts to boil, lower heat and add the buttermilk and stir until the milk starts to separate into curds. Remove from heat as soon as this happens. You can even add a few ice cubes to the curd-whey mix. The heat will make the protein tougher. Hence the need to expose the cheese to as little heat as possible. If the curds a
  10. Suvir Saran

    Per Se

    Stephen Durfee teaches at CIA Greystone Campus in Napa Valley, CA.
  11. Suvir Saran

    Amma

    Mongo, our butter chicken is the staple you find in most Indian restaurants. We happen to use Farm Raised Chicken... if that makes a difference.. and we are very careful about not overcooking the chicken. But for the rest of it, there is nothing too surprising about this one dish. It is served without drama... without any gratuitous extras.... as is most of the food. The only difference between our butter chicken and what may be served in another restaurant, could be the type of chicken being used. The sauce is pretty basic. Recently a seasoned and well traveled guest commented that she
  12. How rude I was.. in answering your post, I forgot to welcome you to eGullet and its Indian forum. You shall enjoy it as you spend time around here. Monica Bhide is working hard to keep the forum active and alive, she has much to offer through her cookbooks and her eGCI classes. Stay tuned for announcments around the site about them. You may be happy you came here. Perhaps in another thread, you can educate us about Indian restaurants in France. Where they are... what kind of food they serve... what kind of customer are they serving and all of that. It would be a great treat for the rest of u
  13. What game did they cook? At our restaurant Amma, we cook wild boar and venison. Also rabbit, teetar and bater (partridge and doves) as specials. In parts of India these are certainly game... not sure what you grew up eating. If you can speak of what meats you ate, perhaps we can give you ideas.
  14. Sandra, my mother, and those of many people I have come to know from Delhi, living in the US, whose parents are my parents generation, have grown up either cooking from her books, or like my mother, also having taken private lessons with Mrs. Balbir Singh. My mother had her books. But they never were opened. She had diary after diary of recipes from her classes with Mrs. Singh. These were recipes to Indian dishes she had learned, and also to flans, souffles, casseroles, mousses, parfaits, cakes, shortbread cookies, puddings and classic creme brulee. She was a very important player in the wor
  15. You are very correct. For my father, when he was trying to work on his blood sugar, through diet, it was not about losing weight, but to avoid having to take pills for blood sugar. He did that successfully for a long time. It was through a regiment that was in equal part about diet and daily exercise. His were the days of no popular diet plans, but still having to worry about having a plan. He did very well, until that one moment when he gave up on exercise and diet, and then had to start taking pills and later insulin. You are smart to give your attention to diet. I shall look at the link
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