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jscarbor

Best Sandwiches Around the World

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I hit Istanbul Grill today in Houston and had the Doner sandwich and it was awesome! Vertical rotisserie meat sliced thin served on the best bread around with pickled cabbage, red onion and lettuce. Ohhhh so good.

Other great sandwiches:

Rueben at kahns

Cheesesteak at that joint on Richmond

BBQ beef sandwich at Thelmas


Edited by jscarbor (log)

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Spicy chicken salad with baba ganoush, marinated olives and yogurt, wrapped in a hot hobbs bread, at the Nile Valley in Edinburgh.

Mmmm....yum. Best sandwich ever. Actually

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The Kahn's Reuben pretty much begins and ends this discussion for me.

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Soft shell crab on good French bread with dollop of tarter sauce and Romaine . . . and nothing else. So good it is foolish to try to improve on it :raz:.

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Soft shell crab on good French bread with dollop of tarter sauce and Romaine . . . and nothing else.  So good it is foolish to try to improve on it :raz:.

I'll take one!

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Classic Club Sandwich on croissant: thin sliced ham, roast beef, turkey, bacon, swiss cheese, with vine-picked tomato slices, bib lettuce, and Hellman's mayonnaise - 19th Hole, Pebble Beach Golf Course.

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Classic Club Sandwich on croissant: thin sliced ham, roast beef, turkey, bacon, swiss cheese, with vine-picked tomato slices, bib lettuce, and Hellman's mayonnaise - 19th Hole, Pebble Beach Golf Course.

I'll take one of those, too!

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I was in Houston this week and I sought out a "Midwest deep fried breaded pork tenderloin sandwich". I actually found one at the Heights Camphouse Bar-B-Q in Houston's Heights area with a little bit of Google sluething. It was on the menu as a "pork loin burger" so I was a little apprehensive about what was to come would imply what we think is a ground up pork fritter. I told the server what I was looking for and she concurred it might be what I was looking for. The cook volunteered that it was like a chicken fried steak but pork and with no gristle. Yes! that is what I wanted. Still the apprehension because my experience was the farther you ventured from Indiana the more bizarre or not quite right the sandwich would be. I am happy to report they hit it just right. It was indeed a very good sandwich. It held its own with the best in the country. My cousins, expatriate Hoosiers living in Houston since 1960 were ecstatic that such a sandwich could be found in Texas. Try one and you will wonder why you put up with chicken fried steak. OK, OK, you have cattle, lots of cattle. The Midwest is hog dominant. I posted a picture of the sandwich on my deep fried breaded pork tenderloin fun web site along with some of the reptutedly best in the country...

http://www.porktenderloinsandwich.com

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Leidenheimer's 7.5 inch poboy bun (this means more crust per square inch of sandwich-as opposed to one cut from a 32 inch loaf)

Roast beef roasted until really, really perfect

Great gravy made from pan dripping and covering, but not drowning the meat

Dressed

Two of them

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I was in Houston this week and I sought out a "Midwest deep fried breaded pork tenderloin sandwich". I actually found one at the Heights Camphouse Bar-B-Q in Houston's Heights area with a little bit of Google sluething. It was on the menu as a "pork loin burger" so I was a little apprehensive about what was to come would imply what we think is a ground up pork fritter. I told the server what I was looking for and she concurred it might be what I was looking for. The cook volunteered that it was like a chicken fried steak but pork and with no gristle. Yes! that is what I wanted. Still the apprehension because my experience was the farther you ventured from Indiana the more bizarre or not quite right the sandwich would be. I am happy to report they hit it just right. It was indeed a very good sandwich. It held its own with the best in the country. My cousins, expatriate Hoosiers living in Houston since 1960 were ecstatic that such a sandwich could be found in Texas. Try one and you will wonder why you put up with chicken fried steak. OK, OK, you have cattle, lots of cattle. The Midwest is hog dominant. I posted a picture of the sandwich on my deep fried breaded pork tenderloin fun web site along with some of the reptutedly best in the country...

http://www.porktenderloinsandwich.com

I wonder if any such authentic pork tenderloin sandwiches are available in Austin? Culver's has 'em, but I'd love to find one in a less fast foody place.

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Someone's Banh Mi has to be on this list. The best one I've had is Banh Mi Saigon in Manhattan, but I can't imagine what the best in Vietnam might be like.

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The "Yankee Stadium" at Mike's Deli in the Bronx.

_yankee3.JPG

...and not to diminish Schwartz's, but by virtue of being a New Yorker I have to add my preference for Katz's and the traditional Pastrami spicing on the LES.

I like Montreal smoke meat, but the spicing is just "different".

Other favorites:

Muffaletta, Central Grocery, New Orleans

i1193.jpg

Oyster Loaf on Pan Bread, Casamento's, New Orleans

gallery_2_2758_8388.jpg


Edited by Jason Perlow (log)

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Understood Jason. As long as we have your respect in New York ... we certainly could never ask you to switch allegiances and declare a preference for our sandwich classic.

Montreal bagels are much better though, admit it :biggrin: .

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They're different, I wouldn't say better. I like them, if that's what you're asking. :laugh:


Edited by Jason Perlow (log)

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Oh yeah ... those New Orleans photos brought back some delicious memories of fried oyster po' boys.

Ridiculously sinful and addictive.

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A veal sandwich, with mushrooms, green peppers, extra sauce and some cheese. If its good, its good enough to have 3 days in a row!

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Someone's Banh Mi has to be on this list. The best one I've had is Banh Mi Saigon in Manhattan, but I can't imagine what the best in Vietnam might be like.

Well, in Hanoi, I nominate the guy who sells them on light-sellers street, near the railroad tracks. He sells what I like to call "new style" banh my, which means he has a turkish doner kebab thing going of pork meat, carved fresh for you and popped into a freshly toasted baguette with cucumber, shredded cabbage, onion, carrot, and cilantro, and topped with ranch sauce and hot sauce. All for 10,000 dong, (USD 1 ~ 16,000d), pure happiness on a bun.

gallery_41378_3106_602044.jpg

"Old style" banh my, which uses mystery meat and those thin red pork sausages just doesn't measure up, in my opinion.

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It's been many years, but I have fond memories of felafel from a stand on Dizengof in Tel Aviv. It's not just a sandwich, it's an all-you-can-eat buffet!

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Since we're talking sandwiches around the world, here are the two very best Dutch sandwiches:

broodje kroket (deepfried veal croquette, with lots of mustard)

gallery_21505_2566_35725.jpg

and broodje halfom: larded liver and pekelvlees, a kind of pastrami

gallery_21505_2566_6232.jpg

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Since we're talking sandwiches around the world, here are the two very best Dutch sandwiches:

broodje kroket (deepfried veal croquette, with lots of mustard)

gallery_21505_2566_35725.jpg

and broodje halfom: larded liver and pekelvlees, a kind of pastrami

gallery_21505_2566_6232.jpg

Chufi, is it customary to drink milk with that veal croquette sandwich? It seems like an odd combination. And what is that in the glass next to the milk?

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Someone's Banh Mi has to be on this list. The best one I've had is Banh Mi Saigon in Manhattan, but I can't imagine what the best in Vietnam might be like.

I had an incredible $2 Banh Mi at Hong Kong Supermarket in Gretna, Louisiana, just outside New Orleans:

gallery_2_2758_2932.jpg

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