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Mussina

Bars & Breakfast in Chicago

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Hi all - looking for an after dinner suggestion for a bar. We'll be eating dinner at Tru (can't wait!) on Wednesday night on our one night tour of Chicago. Are there any cool bars or places to listen to music in the area that we should check out after dinner?

Also - any good breakfast spots? We'll be staying at the W on North Lakeshore Drive.

Thanks all for the advice.

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Hi all - looking for an after dinner suggestion for a bar.  We'll be eating dinner at Tru (can't wait!) on Wednesday night on our one night tour of Chicago.  Are there any cool bars or places to listen to music in the area that we should check out after dinner? 

Also - any good breakfast spots?  We'll be staying at the W on North Lakeshore Drive.

Thanks all for the advice.

I don't know too much about bars, but for breakfast, you're just a few blocks from Fox & Obel Café.


"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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I'm a big fan of Lou Mitchell's for breakfast, although I'll admit that I'm very much a traditionalist when it comes to breakfast. Never been to F&O's cafe for breakfast but the lunch I had there was fantastic.

Lou Mitchell's Restaurant

565 W Jackson Blvd

Chicago, IL 60661

(312) 939-3111

Fox and Obel Food Market & Cafe

401 E Illinois St

Chicago, IL 60611

(312) 410-7301

As for bars, the ones at the Four Seasons and the Peninsula are both really great. But for more detailed information, I suggest checking out this site:

The Chicago Bar Project by Sean Parnell

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Fox & Abel sounds perfect. On the bar front -- which neighborhood is close to Tru/our hotel (I am a Chicago "newbie" (Hate that word!))

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Fox & Abel sounds perfect.  On the bar front -- which neighborhood is close to Tru/our hotel (I am a Chicago "newbie" (Hate that word!))

Tru/W are in Streeterville, so if you're using the guide, River North – Streeterville – Magnificent Mile – Gold Coast would be your choice for walking distances or very short cab rides. Enjoy!

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Fox & Abel sounds perfect.  On the bar front -- which neighborhood is close to Tru/our hotel (I am a Chicago "newbie" (Hate that word!))

How about Chicago virgin? :wink:

Correct me if I'm in error, Ronnie, but Tru looks to be about a half-mile from your hotel. The Peninsula is a few blocks from Tru; the Four Seasons is a few blocks from the Peninsula.

You can look up all this stuff on Metromix.

BTW, it's Fox and Obel, not Abel.


"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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You are correct Alex. As hsm posted above, River North, Streeterville, Magnificent Mile and Gold Coast are all part of the same, relatively small, geographical area. For example, the distance between the W Lakeshore Tru is about a half mile, or 4 blocks and the distance between the W Lakeshore and Fox & Obel is about .6 miles. They're all adjacent to each other.

Here's a link to an informative map:

Chicago Maps and Neighborhood Guides

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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I know that this is completely cheesy and touristy, but you may want to consider the Signature Room on the 95th floor of the Hancock Building for drinks. It's very close to Tru and kind of a fun thing to do the first time one visits Chicago, especially if it's a clear night.

As for me, between the food and the wine, my favorite post-Tru activity is finding a nice, comfortable couch or bed and remaining in a horizontal position for the rest of the evening.


-Josh

Now blogging at http://jesteinf.wordpress.com/

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I know that this is completely cheesy and touristy, but you may want to consider the Signature Room on the 95th floor of the Hancock Building for drinks.  It's very close to Tru and kind of a fun thing to do the first time one visits Chicago, especially if it's a clear night.

As for me, between the food and the wine, my favorite post-Tru activity is finding a nice, comfortable couch or bed and remaining in a horizontal position for the rest of the evening.

LOL!

The Signature Room is great for adequate, slightly over-priced drinks and lousy for food. But yes, on a clear night, the view is tremendous and worth the trip.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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I'd also highly recommend the Peninsula "terrace" for breakfast. Luxurious, but simple, straightforward - and damn good service all within a grand light and airy space.

U.E.


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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The Oak Tree restaurant is great. It is on the sixth floor of 900 North Michigan shopping complex. Get a corner table and the view is great...straight down Michigan Avenue. The food is delicious and the service is professional. Check it out.

Here is a blurg from citysearch about their food selection:

"Breakfast fare leans toward fancy plates like egg-white scrambles, cranberry-pecan hot cakes, and omelettes with cilantro, tomatoes and hot peppers. Try the Baltic Eggs Benedict, poached eggs with smoked salmon on an English muffin with hollandaise sauce and black caviar garnish--chic, and delicious, too. For lunch, go for a half-pound burger or meatball sandwich, or stay light and opt for one of a couple dozen salad choices."


Edited by The Blissful Glutton (log)

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I know that this is completely cheesy and touristy, but you may want to consider the Signature Room on the 95th floor of the Hancock Building for drinks.  It's very close to Tru and kind of a fun thing to do the first time one visits Chicago, especially if it's a clear night.

As for me, between the food and the wine, my favorite post-Tru activity is finding a nice, comfortable couch or bed and remaining in a horizontal position for the rest of the evening.

I would hate to ruin an evening of wonderful service at Tru with a trip to the Signature Room but that's just me. Also, having just eaten at Tru on Saturday (excellent food and service as usual) I must take my hat off to anyone who can attempt a bar after that meal - it was all I could do to make it back to our hotel room. Of all the tastings I think Tru gives you the most food per course and it really adds up.

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For after dinner drinks, NoMi at the Park Hyatt. It is a stunning and chic space with a good wine list and great drinks. I also agree that the 95th floor is worth a stop - service is usually slow, however the view is memorable.

If your looking for live music, The Green Mill. It's going to be a cab ride, however the oldest jazz club in the city - the real deal.

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For after dinner drinks, NoMi at the Park Hyatt. It is a stunning and chic space with a good wine list and great drinks.

Ahhh, a BIG yes to NoMi. :wub:

U.E.


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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The Oak Tree restaurant is great. It is on the sixth floor of 900 North Michigan shopping complex. Get a corner table and the view is great...straight down Michigan Avenue. The food is delicious and the service is professional. Check it out.

Here is a blurg from citysearch about their food selection:

"Breakfast  fare leans toward fancy plates like egg-white scrambles, cranberry-pecan hot cakes, and omelettes with cilantro, tomatoes and hot peppers. Try the Baltic Eggs Benedict, poached eggs with smoked salmon on an English muffin with hollandaise sauce and black caviar garnish--chic, and delicious, too. For lunch, go for a half-pound burger or meatball sandwich, or stay light and opt for one of a couple dozen salad choices."

Oak Tree was a great recommendation. My wife and I were staying at the Omni Parker House at N. Michigan & E. Huron this past week. We went there for breakfast at about 10:00 a.m. on Thursday morning. Even the restaurant's pancakes and waffles were excellent. Excellent service, nice city views, and plenty of tables available.


Liam

Eat it, eat it

If it's gettin' cold, reheat it

Have a big dinner, have a light snack

If you don't like it, you can't send it back

Just eat it -- Weird Al Yankovic

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I was just in Chicago and made a point of going to some breakfast places that I had heard alot about but to which I had never been.

Toast: Damen north of Armitage. Solid, fun combinations.

Orange: Printers Row, Very good, lots of fresh fruit, Frushi (fruit sushi rolls),

They even have a breakfast tasting menu. Again, Very Good!

Bongo Room: On Milkwaukee (i think) in Bucktown. More of a latin influence, also very good.

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For breakfast, it depends partly on the day of the week. Many restaurants serve Sunday brunch but are not open the rest of the week. To me there are three basic types of brunch:

1. A la carte at places that serve the same breakfast menu during the week as on the weekends. There are lots of good ones, and some of them have multiple locations; my favorites are Walker Brothers and other locations of the Original Pancake House, Bongo Room, Flo, Wishbone, M. Henry, Kitsch'n, Orange (no website), and Lou Mitchell's.

2. A la carte at places that only serve on weekends (usually only Sunday, a few on Saturday), including North Pond, Magnolia Cafe, Sola, and Frontera Grill.

3. Buffet places that only serve brunch on Sundays, including Seasons at the Four Seasons, the cafe at the Ritz, NoMI, Allgauer's, and Barn of Barrington. (Some of these serve a separate a la carte breakfast during the week.)

Several of the places above have opened additional locations in the city and suburbs in the almost two years since this topic was active, including Bongo Room at Wabash and Roosevelt in the South Loop.

Typically, you can make reservations at (2) and (3), and there are often long waits on Sundays at (1), which don't usually accept reservations.


Edited by nsxtasy (log)

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If you have the late seating take one of those horse drawn carriage rides. Soon the whole area will be decorated, nicely for the Holidays. Have them drop you off here. If your lucky you can catch some of the staff of TRU in wild.

I forget but I think they still serve both blue cheese and anchovie stuffed olives @ Pippens.


"And in the meantime, listen to your appetite and play with your food."

Alton Brown, Good Eats

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