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ulterior epicure

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Everything posted by ulterior epicure

  1. That was supposed to be tweets. Scout's honor.
  2. Oh, I see. While I was aware they've started a Twitter campaign, I have no idea what twits they're dropping in cyberspace.
  3. I wouldn't be surprised in the least if achieving a 3rd Michelin star didn't factor very heavily into both the execution of, and timing of, Chef Boulud's considerations in going ahead with a renovation at Daniel. How could it not? Bruni was enamored by it, could work the same magic with the Michelin inspectors. Right, because new upholstery is exactly what the folks at Michelin should be focusing on. I take it you are the #1 fan of their NY Twitter feed too? Huh?
  4. I wouldn't be surprised in the least if achieving a 3rd Michelin star didn't factor very heavily into both the execution of, and timing of, Chef Boulud's considerations in going ahead with a renovation at Daniel. How could it not? Bruni was enamored by it, could work the same magic with the Michelin inspectors. Right, because new upholstery is exactly what the folks at Michelin should be focusing on.
  5. I will make a prediction: they will - at least one - in this next round of reviews.
  6. I believe it. Here's what I wrote about the petits fours in my blog post:
  7. I was just in Hong Kong, where I heard from a few chefs that he visits there quite frequently. Consulting gig, I assume. But I have no clue as to what he's up to in New York.
  8. Good grief, they're giving out MORE stars? Shouldn't they be taking some away? All I have to say is, at least one of the 18 new stars better be going to Eleven Madison Park. And, at least one other star had better be going to Corton.
  9. Thanks, Kenneth, for that explanation.
  10. Kenneth, can I assume that you and your wife received the same five dishes for the tasting menu? And also, were all of those dishes taken from the a la carte menu?
  11. lgott, that is interesting, indeed. The Miyazaki-gyu beef I had at Bar Charlie a couple of months ago was A5-10. It was alright. I didn't care for the triple sear technique they employed. The A5-11 wagyu I had at Alex a few nights before, by comparison, was extraordinary. That might have been the best piece of beef I've had in years. re: A5-12. If I'm not mistaken, that's a piece of beef at least seven years in the making, as the last cow to have received that rating was in 2002.
  12. And I'll never forget her Hundred Corner Crabcakes.
  13. I heard that it was closing some time ago. Has it happened?
  14. In case you missed my point (because I often do), I just wanted to illustrate that for every shockingly declasse wardrobe that walks into a restaurant, an equally absurd costume party waltzes in under the guise of formality. It seems that some people would be happier with me showing up as the Joker rather than Happy Gilmore if not only for the sake of having lapels and a pair of trousers.
  15. Sneakeater, you know this is a red herring. Restaurants like le Bernardin and Eleven Madison Park DO have a dress code. You know perfectly well that a room full of sweatpants and hoodies would not be met at any of the four-starred in New York. But places like Eleven Madison Park also afford their guest the courtesy of comfort: should a man not want to wear a coat, he doesn't have to. I'm reminded of the funny, but helpful instruction by the reservationist at Restaurant Gordon Ramsay at RHR: "Gentleman are reminded that trainers and track suits are not allowed." I'm also reminded of my first
  16. I think it's also a function of how comfortable one feels without a jacket at any of these restaurants that have a more lax policy. While I wouldn't think twice about going sans jacket to masa, I would think twice about it at Jean Georges, or Eleven Madison Park. But everyone has their own comfort level. sethd prefers to be formal, whilst, on the other side of the spectrum, Ms. Hamburgler pants has a very colorful comfort level. I wish life would come so carefree to me.
  17. I wouldn't call EMP casual in the absolute sense. An evening when nobody wore a jacket strikes me as atypical, but it is probably the least formal of the six NYC four-stars.Actually, I think that masa occupies that seat. Perhaps it's the counter-seating. Or, perhaps because it is the only four-star that is not recognizably French. Or, perhaps its because the chef is wearing the equivalent of linen scrubs. What e'er it be, it seemed the least formal of all of the New York four-stars to me. Clearly, I missed the sign-up sheet for noble stock at birth. Being a bourgeois, through and through
  18. So do you tell Passard to go back to the kitchen when he comes out in denim overalls and boots? ← The last time I was at Le Bernardin (in March of this year), Eric Ripert was sporting some nice denim threads and boots. It didn't bother me a bit. Rather, I was simply glad to see that he cared enough to show up.
  19. Curious though the case, I think this is true. FWIW, I also think that how much of the meal one is asked to pay for also factors in largely to whether the meal is a true "VIP" situation. I think we've all acknowledged that one can ask for, and will often receive, a "VIP-like" meal, even if it's not printed on the menu.
  20. And we'll have to agree to disagree on this point, my friend. l'Arpege is not exactly the formal fare that I come to expect from a Michelin 3-star in Paris. I don't need stiff - in fact, I find Ms. Cousin's brand of service quite refreshing in its frankness. Very much like the easy-going, laid back feeling I get from the staff at Eleven Madison Park, actually. And, if you are to cite attire as a contributing factor to qualifying a "fine dining" experience, then I fail to see how you can possibly classify l'Arpege (or any of the three-stars in Paris these days, for that matter) as fine din
  21. We can easily enough agree to disagree on that. I found no difference in spirit or length of meal, or anything else appreciable for that matter between the 8 course menu at LeB and the 11 course at EMP. All things equal, I prefer to try 11 things vs. 8 things, sure. But they both seemed the same in style to me - "here is our best, enjoy!" ← Until you see the table next to yours getting 13 or more dishes, some of which are not on the menu... But I do agree with you on the point of the 8 vs. 11 having no effect on the overall merit a restaurant is likely to garner from me. To answer my
  22. What's the difference? (I'm not arguing here, I'm just curious what you find the distinguishing point.) Is it the length, which you cite above as allowing for more creativity and variety? Coming from another angle, have you had a 10+ course meal that didn't feel "extended/VIP" to you?
  23. I don't think this is right. Le Bernardin, Jean Georges, Daniel, and Eleven Madison Park all offer their top tastings to anybody who is willing to pay the prices that are clearly marked on their menus. per se is the exception. ← Nah, per se is the same - anyone can ask for it. I meant to stress VIP "style" - i.e. what they would drag out unrequested for VIP's, not to suggest that only VIP's can order them. ← Not to get into a war of semantics, but anything in the "VIP style" does suggest that it is a format that no common restaurant diner can access. To me, all of those tasting men
  24. That category being just literally the category of restaurants that are "4 star NYT"? Or that category being a restaurant generally of the same caliber independent of NYT? The first statement is irrefutable. The other, oh yeah, you have a fight on your hands :-) (and that fight will have nothing to do with personal preference, I promise!) I'm referring to both your former and latter qualifications.
  25. I don't think this is right. Le Bernardin, Jean Georges, Daniel, and Eleven Madison Park all offer their top tastings to anybody who is willing to pay the prices that are clearly marked on their menus. per se is the exception.
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