Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Stone

The World's Best Coconut Cake

Recommended Posts

ludja   

Here's a separate thread that started recently on The Peninsula Grill Ccconut Cake: click

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just tried Sethro's cake recipe and I baked it in small 1 1/4 inch flexi molds. They came out great, make a great addition to my petit fours collection I'll probably put a dab of buttercream on top and a sprinkle of toasted coconut or maybe a bit of ganache. Thanks for the recipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was flipping through an old issue of Bon Appetit today and Francois Payard had a really simple recipe for coconut cake. Basically, it was just coconut, sugar, and eggs (whisked over a double boiler, then combined with the coconut and sugar). I can post measurements tomorrow if you're interested. The cake baked, then layered with ganache.

I'm late to the party but...

This recipe is also in Payard's book Simply Sensational Desserts. I made it as specified, and it was a little sweet, but otherwise fit the title of the book to a tee! The people I gave it too (and I've brought them dozens of my test runs) still keep mentioning it to me!

So delicious for something so simple.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Amy Eber   

MOUNDS BAR CAKE

Preheat 350º

GANACHE

10 1/2 oz bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped

3 1/2 oz. milk chocolate, finely chopped

1 Tbs corn syrup (opt)

1 2/3 cups heavy cream

CAKE

4 large eggs

1 1/2 cups sugar

3 1/3 cups unsweetened, shredded coconut

TOPPING

1/3 cup unsweetened, shredded coconut, toasted in oven

To make ganache, place chocolate and corn syrup in a large bowl. Bring cream to a boil and immediately pour over chocolate. Whisk until smooth. Press plastic wrap directly onto chocolate and chill for 2 hours.

Prepare a 10 1/2 x 15 inch jelly roll pan by spraying with cooking spray and lining with parchment paper.. Lightly dust with flour.

Beat eggs and sugar together with whisk attachment. Place bowl over simmering water and continue whisking until mixture is warm to the touch. Remove from the heat and beat on high speed until tripled in volume (5 to 10 minutes)

Using a rubber spatula, fold in 3 1/3 cups coconut. Pour into prepared pan and bake 18 to 22 minutes, until lightly golden and toothpick comes out clean. Cool in pan on wire rack, about 15 minutes. Loosen with a knife then invert onto wire rack. Cool completely then carefully peel parchment off.

Trim edges and cut into three equal rectangles (10x5 inches). Ice layers with ganache and finish by coating top and sides with ganache and toasted coconut.

I'm looking for something similar to carrot cake, but a little more dense and gooey. I'm thinking if it had some texture (from desecated coconut) in it, that would be nice too.

It has to be sturdy enough to unmold from a flexipan.

Anyone have a recipe in the ballpark?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made my very best ever coconut cake for Easter dinner yesterday. It is a recipe from epicurious.com that I made a few changes to and it was the hit of Easter dinner (that and the Gouda au gratin potatoes). The cake was incredibly moist and rich. I split the three layers (much easier to do than I imagined, by the way) and filled with lemon curd (I'll make my own next time), trimmed the cake on the sides, frosted, lined up bunny peeps on the side, dusted with coconut and topped with a little chocolate bunny. It was beautiful and delicious - I was so proud of myself, I felt a little ridiculous, actually :blush: !

Here's a link to the recipe: Coconut Layer Cake w/ Cream Cheese Frosting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Can i use a can of coconut milk instead of cream of coconut?

I really don't know that answer to that. The cream of coconut is like sweetened condensed milk - very sweet and thick. Coconut milk is less sweet and thin, isn't it? I would think that you could substitute, but how or if it would change the taste/texture, I don't know. Maybe someone else could answer this question. Is there a specific reason that you would want to use the milk instead, or is it just what you happen to have??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
slbunge   

Did you happen to snap a photo? If so, please post. Thanks.

As for the using coconut milk rather than cream of coconut, I would also think that you might not get the texture you want with the milk. The coconut cake that I have used a recipe from Paul Prudhomme that starts with coconut flesh that ends up as paste. Thinner would not have been better in my case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you happen to snap a photo?  If so, please post.  Thanks.

I did take a picture, but I am not digital yet - I will have to wait until I finish this roll, have it developed, get a picture CD and figure out how to post to egullet :wacko: !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tmgrobyn   
:biggrin: You had me at Coconut Cake and then slammed the dessert door shut and locked me inside when you added the lemon curd! I would be in dessert heaven! It sounds wonderful. Congratulations on your success! And I am sure everyone who had some was happy you succeeded also! :smile::smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you replace the 1 tsp vanilla in the cake and in the frosting with 1 tsp coconut extract, or did you add an additional 1 tsp of coconut to each?

Can't wait to try this--it sounds wonderful!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you replace the 1 tsp vanilla in the cake and in the frosting with 1 tsp coconut extract, or did you add an additional 1 tsp of coconut to each?

Can't wait to try this--it sounds wonderful!

I went ahead and used both the vanilla and the coconut. I am very leery of subtracting vanilla from a recipe. I always think that it adds depth and don't want to lose it. I might try it as an experiment, but I was making this for company and didn't want to take any chances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ohmyholyoats. I so want a piece of coconut cake this year! That touch of lemon in the cake sounds divine. I really anticipating the photos!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
godiv@   
Can i use a can of coconut milk instead of cream of coconut?

I actually tried this and didn't work out. As mentioned, it is much thicker than the milk. My cake was super dense and collapsed in the center. I tried the milk and it worked wonders. I also added coconut flakes to the batter and it was oh so delicious. The longer it sits, the better it is. Figure it's the coconut oil.

I made mine with SMB and added coconut cream and extra flakes and it was heavenly! :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I *think* you can thin out the cream of coconut to use as coconut milk. I can get it fresh here, so I've never tried.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sethro   
I *think* you can thin out the cream of coconut to use as coconut milk. I can get it fresh here, so I've never tried.

Nope. Cream of coconut is basically a drink syrup, pretty much identical to coco lopez. Its about as thick and sweet as condensed milk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I actually tried this and didn't work out.  As mentioned, it is much thicker than the milk. My cake was super dense and collapsed in the center.  I tried the milk and it worked wonders.  I also added coconut flakes to the batter and it was oh so delicious.  The longer it sits, the better it is.  Figure it's the coconut oil.

I'm confused. Did you use coconut *milk* or coconut *cream*. The recipe linked to above calls for coconut cream, but from your fourth sentence, it sounds like you used coconut milk. Did you use a different recipe that called for coconut milk? I have a lot of coconut milk, but no coconut cream, so a recipe with coconut milk would be great!

I made mine with SMB and added coconut cream and extra flakes and it was heavenly!  :rolleyes:

What's SMB?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It just happens that I have a client looking for a coconut cake this week. I'll give this one a go, and leave my review. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
godiv@   
I'm confused.  Did you use coconut *milk* or coconut *cream*.  The recipe linked to above calls for coconut cream, but from your fourth sentence, it sounds like you used coconut milk.  Did you use a different recipe that called for coconut milk?  I have a lot of coconut milk, but no coconut cream, so a recipe with coconut milk would be great!

I substituted the milk in my butter cake recipe with the coconut milk. It worked fine.


Edited by godiv@ (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! Huge success! The client chose this for her wedding cake. I filled it with a coconut cream cheese mousse, and iced with coconut cream cheese IMBC.

I also served the cake to family for a birthday, and everyone went gaga for it. Thank you!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Plum tart with almonds
       
      Starting from the first half of August, in the shops and on stands appear the first domestic plums. In September there are so many of them that I have a problem deciding which kind I should choose. Small and big, round and more ovate, violet, red and yellow. You can eat them fresh or make a lot of preserves (jams, plum stew, stewed fruits, pickles, liqueurs, plum brandy). Our favorite are big and round greengage plums, or slightly firm violet plums.
       
      Plums have a lot of valuable attributes. They regulate digestion and protect us from free radicals. Dried plums are more valuable regarding vitamin and fiber content, but they have five times more calories than fresh fruits.
       
      Plums have quite a lot B vitamins, so for a long time they have been well regarded for having a soothing effect on the nervous system and improving our frame of mind. That's why you simply have to make a plum cake. Either now or when the dreary autumn days arrive. Their benign impact on the nerves could be a good excuse for putting another piece of cake on your plate.
       
      I don't like complicated cookery. In this recipe you will find a lot of ingredients, but even so, preparing this delicious cake is very simple.
       
      Ingredients:
      Dough:
      250g of flour
      half a teaspoon of baking powder
      8g of vanilla sugar
      3 tablespoons of sugar
      150ml of 18% cream
      150g of butter
      Filling:
      600g of plums
      1 egg white
      3 tablespoons of minced almonds
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      200g of plum stew
      1 teaspoon of cinnamon
      Crumble topping:
      50g of butter
      3-4 tablespoons of flour
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      8g of vanilla sugar
      1 egg yolk
      Mix together the dry ingredients for the dough: flour, baking powder, sugar and vanilla sugar. Add cream. Mince the butter and add it to the dry ingredients. Quickly knead into smooth dough. Cover with plastic wrap and leave in the fridge for half an hour.
       
      Heat the oven up to 200C. Cover a baking pan (e.g. for a tart) with the dough, leaving the edges slightly raised around the sides. Whisk the egg white and cover the dough with it. Sprinkle with the almonds and brown sugar. Bake for 14 minutes. Take it out of the oven. Don't turn off the oven.
       
      Make the crumble topping when the dough is in the oven. Melt the butter, cool it a bit then add the flour, sugar, vanilla sugar and egg yolk. Mix it with a fork until you have lumps.
       
      Clean the plums, cut them into halves and remove the stones. Cover the baked base with plum stew, add the plums and sprinkle with cinnamon and the crumble topping. Bake for 20 minutes.
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Pineapple and coconut – the ideal couple
       
      Today, inspired by the recipes from the book "Zielone koktajle. 365 przepisów" ("Green cocktails. 365 recipes") I prepared a light coconut-pineapple dessert. You may make it without sugar if you have enough sweet fruit. If your pineapple isn't very ripe, add a bit of honey to your dessert.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      fruit mousse
      1 pineapple
      300ml of coconut milk
      1 banana
      150ml of orange juice
      2 tablespoons of desiccated coconut
      decoration
      50g of butter
      1 tablespoon of caster sugar
      4 tablespoons of desiccated coconut
      4 slices of orange
      fruit

      Blend all the ingredients of the fruit mousse. Put it into some glasses and leave in the fridge. Put the desiccated coconut, sugar and butter into a pan. Fry constantly, stirring on a low heat until the butter is melted. Leave to cool down a bit. Put 2-3 tablespoons of it on top of the desserts. Decorate with a slice of orange, fruit and some peppermint leaves before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Smile of the summer – apricot-peach shortcake
       
      Fortunately, the summer is not only about the weather. There is also fresh, sweet-smelling fruit. Today I would like to share with you the recipe for an easy to make weekend cake. It is excellent for afternoon tea or coffee. A little work and a little baking and after that you may serve and eat, and serve and eat again and again ... I remind you that it should be a weekend cake, so if you eat everything at once, you will need to bake another one 

      Ingredients:
      dough
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      75g of sugar
      1 egg
      1 egg yolk
      1 teaspoon of baking powder

      fruit:
      1kg of apricot
      4 peaches
      2 packets of powdered vanilla blancmange
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Put the flour, sugar, baking powder and butter onto a baking board. Chop it all up with a knife. When you have the consistency of crumble topping, add the egg and egg yolk and then knead the dough quickly. Divide the dough into two parts – 2/3 and 1/3. Cover the pieces of dough with plastic wrap and put them into the freezer.
      Wash the apricots, remove the stones and cube them. Put them into a saucepan, add a bit of water and boil until they are soft. Stir the blancmange powder in 150ml of cold water and add it to the apricots. Boil for 2 minutes stirring constantly. Turn off the heat. Wash the peaches, remove the stones and cube them. Add them to the apricots and mix them in.
      Heat the oven up to 180C.
      Smooth a 23-cm cake tin with some butter and sprinkle with breadcrumbs. Grate the bigger part of the dough onto the cake tin, even it out and bake for 15-17 minutes. Take out the cake, but don't turn off the oven. Put the fruit mixture onto it and grate the rest of the dough onto the top. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By pastrygirl
      I'm watching The Sweet Makers on BBC - four British pastry chefs & confectioners recreate Tudor, Georgian, and Victorian sweets with petiod ingredients and equipment. A little British Baking Show, a little Downtown Abbey. 
       
      Check it it out for a slice of pastry history. 
       
      BBC viewer only available to the U.K., but on this side of the pond where there's a will, there's a way. 
    • By Kasia
      White chocolate whip with aquafaba with crumble topping and fruit.
       
      Today I would like to share with you a dessert fit for a king. It needs a bit of work, but it is easy, and so tasty that you won't regret the time you spent on it. I have already made chocolate whip with aquafaba. Today I added a bit of whisked sweet cream, due to which it is more creamy but it isn't suitable for vegetarians.

      You may use any fruit. In my opinion, bilberries, blueberries or raspberries are best. Cherries would also be excellent, but you may use your favourite fruit.

      Ingredients:
      crumble topping:
      50g of butter
      50g of flour
      50g of sugar
      1 tablespoon of sesame seeds
       
      whip:
      200ml of aquafaba (from one tin of chickpeas)
      150g of white chocolate
      150ml of 30% sweet cream
      30g of caster sugar
      other ingredients
      fruit
      caster sugar

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Cover a baking sheet with baking paper.
      Make the crumble topping. Make a smooth dough with the ingredients. Make a ball with it, roll it out flat and put it on the baking paper. Bake for 10-15 minutes until it is golden. Cool it down and crumble it.
      Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie and leave it to cool down a little. Whip the aquafaba and sweet cream with caster sugar in a separate bowl. Mix them together. Add the white chocolate and stir thoroughly but gently. Put the chocolate whip into some small bowls and leave in the fridge for 2 hours.
      Put the crumble topping onto the chocolate whip. Decorate with the fruit and peppermint leaves.

      Enjoy your meal!
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×