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You're not supposed to eat THAT part!


Randi
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The other day I was opening a can of black olives and dumping them into a container. I couldn't resist eating a few right off the bat. And I did my usual...sipped the brine. Yummm...it's the exact taste of the black olives, in liquid form!

I know it's probably unhealthy to drink that much salt - so I do limit it to a sip or two. And I also know that people would call me crazy for drinking...BRINE!

I remember a thread where people mentioned that they eat the shells of cooked shrimp. And there are folks who enjoy gristle, for example.

So what I'm wondering is.....

Is there any thing you eat that other people usually throw away? I don't mean things that aren't food (like paper or paste). I mean things that are part of a food item, but not usually considered edible.

Anyone?

"Well," said Pooh, "what I like best --" and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn't know what it was called. - A.A. Milne

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Hmm, well, I almost always eat the garnish. I enjoy the flavors of raw curly parsely and mint leaves.

I also enjoy the peppercorny red colord brine solution that pickled sausages come in.

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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Lots of people throw away broccoli stems, but they're very good if prepared and cooked properly. My father has enjoyed cooking them ever since he learned an Indian way to deal with them: cut them in half or smaller, so that they will cook at the same rate as the flowers.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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I eat the pineapple core, too, but no-one ever told me not to. I prefer the less fibrous part of the fruit, though.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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How can you chew and digest pineapple cores? Your "personal plumbing" must be clean as a whistle! :blink: I like chicken and turkey wings, and my family thinks they're a waste of time and should be used only to make soups.

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How can you chew and digest pineapple cores?  Your "personal plumbing" must be clean as a whistle!  :blink:  I like chicken and turkey wings, and my family thinks they're a waste of time and should be used only to make soups.

why, thank you--- :unsure: i think. actually, most of the time, i chew on them, like one would gnaw a great rib bone, then toss. but sometimes they are more tender, and then...good fiber, as you have pointed out.

"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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Chicken wings as a part you're "not supposed to eat"? Try chicken feet! I love 'em!

Yeah...it's a part of a chicken or turkey my whole family decided a while back no one is "supposed to" eat. Toss that useless thing in the stockpot! :laugh:

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Fish eyes.

Works like a charm, every time. :biggrin::blink:

Soba

Fish eyes. Okay. I eat about anything else. But how does one eat fish eyes? How do you prepare them? I am totally clueless and not mockng you. I eat crawfish and all kind of scavangers of the sea, so eyes shouldn't bother me, but they do. Give me an eaay prep method so I can try them, and I will.

But still, don't talk to me about snakes, because at this point in my life I just can't go there. :blink:

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Lobster tomalley, eschewed by many, loved by the chosen few...

we are the few, the proud, the chosen :biggrin:

True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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In sorrento two weeks ago I ordered the specialty of the house, "fried fish." Well, I got exactly that, a plate of whole fish, fried.

While all the other American tourists gasped, I promptly ate everything on the plate.

One woman who was "sneakily" taking pictures of me was particularly disgusted. So I did what any other proud gourmet would do, I took my fork, gouged out an eye, and oh so slowly brought it to my mouth, consuming it like it was the best thing ever to have passed through my lips. I then looked at her and licked my lips. She was aghast.

*high five, soba*

Andrew Baber

True I got more fans than the average man but not enough loot to last me

to the end of the week, I live by the beat like you live check to check

If you don't move yo' feet then I don't eat, so we like neck to neck

A-T-L, Georgia, what we do for ya?

The Gentleman Gourmand

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At work I always swipe and chew on several parsley stems while they're being prepped. Then later on i see another prep cook squeezing the chopped parsley, in a towel, directly into the trash. What a waste, I always want to run and get a glass to save the juice.

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I can't help but chew on the chicken backs and necks out of the stock kettle. Tastey little bits they are!!!

Tobin

It is all about respect; for the ingredient, for the process, for each other, for the profession.

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At work I always swipe and chew on several parsley stems while they're being prepped. Then later on i see another prep cook squeezing the chopped parsley, in a towel, directly into the trash. What a waste, I always want to run and get a glass to save the juice.

Chewing on parsely is also great for your breath.

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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Fish eyes.

Works like a charm, every time.  :biggrin:  :blink:

Soba

Fish eyes. Okay. I eat about anything else. But how does one eat fish eyes? How do you prepare them?

Well, one doesn't really purposely prepare fish eyes as a stand-alone dish. It's just a little extra special treat when you're eating fresh, whole fish. Like the orange and green bits in blue crabs, or the tomalley/tamale in lobster.

I've only ever eaten the eyes from steamed fish, not sure why. Will have a try fried fish eyes next time I get a chance.

I like to chew on what I guess must be shoulder ligament from beef steaks (I seemed to find them in only in ranch steaks). It's very white and very chewy. Totally undigestable, but kinda like natural gum. Anyone have an idea of what it might be?

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The cores of cabbage and cauliflower: I adore these and reserve these choice bits for myself when I am the cook.

All the soft cartilaginous pieces at the ends of chicken bones and between chicken breasts: I love to gnaw them off and crunch on them.

The stems of dried shiitake muchrooms that have been reconstituted: I slice these chewy morsels off and pop them in my mouth as I cook.

Apple and pear cores: the seeds won't really sprout into trees inside you.

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All the soft cartilaginous pieces at the ends of chicken bones and between chicken breasts: I love to gnaw them off and crunch on them.

Oh dearie me! :laugh: I get that stuff in my mouth and I want to spit. :sad: Fascinating how different we all can be!

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