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AlainV

Cream: [Extra] Heavy/Whipping, and Others

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Does anyone know the difference manufacturing cream and heavy whipping cream? Manufacturing cream seems to be thicker than whipping cream, so I'm assuming manufacturing cream has a higher fat%. Is that correct? Has anybody used manufacturers cream instead of heavy whipping cream? Let me know your experiences with ganaches. Thanks.


Edited by ChristopherMichael (log)

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I never heard of manufacturing cream before. Is that a West Coast thing? Never saw it on any of the product lists from my suppliers. Curious to know what it is, though.

Eileen

I don't know if it's is a west coast thing or not, because I have never worked outside of CA. I never really paid attention to it until I started working with chocolate. I tried it a few days ago to make a 72% ganache. The first batch I made I measured wrong (forgot to reset the scale) so the ratio was 1 part chocolate to 1.5 parts manufacturers cream. The ganache came out great and was still firm enough to roll (could of been even softer). I then made a batch using 1:1 and in my opinion were to firm for my taste. I'm still scratching my head. The only thing I can think of is that it has some stabilizer or something or the fat content so high that it's just takes more of it to get a really soft ganache. But, then again, I just don't really know.

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Manufacturering cream is pasteurized but not ultra-homogenized and does not contain any of the additives that are put into "heavy" cream to make it whip with more volume. Usually this is carageenan or a type of gelatin. It has to be a minimum of 38% and is usually 40% butterfat whereas regular heavy cream is at least 36% butterfat.

It behaves differently in sauces than regular commercial heavy cream, in heated sauces it does not "break" as easily. It can also be beaten into a very smooth sweet butter which with commercial heavy cream, that contains additives, will be slightly grainy.

Here you can find nutritional facts about the Alta-Dena brand.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Manufacturer's cream is pasteurized but not ultra-homogenized and does not contain any of the additives that are put into "heavy" cream to make it whip with more volume.  Usually this is carageenan or a type of gelatin.  It has to be a minimum of 38% and is usually 40% butterfat whereas regular heavy cream is at least 36% butterfat.

It behaves differently in sauces than regular commercial heavy cream, in heated sauces it does not "break" as easily.  It can also be beaten into a very smooth sweet butter which with commercial heavy cream, that contains additives, will be slightly grainy.

So why does everyone always say to use (in ganaches) heavy whipping cream and not if manufacturers cream is higher in fat%? Just curious.

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Heavy Cream is 36-40% butterfat that is FDA regulated....Manufacturers cream is usually around 42% butterfat but I believe that the term "manufacturers cream" is not regulated by the FDA so it isn't guaranteed what percent it is besides what the producer says...Manufacturers cream is usually only made for professional settings as you can tell because you can't buy it in store...

The creams after that are

Double Cream - 48% butterfat

clotted cream - 55% butterfat

These two are primarily available in Europe and only online for people in the USA...

If you are doing truffles heavy cream or manufacturers cream is acceptable...

Robert

Chocolate Forum

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Heavy Cream is 36-40% butterfat that is FDA regulated....Manufacturers cream is usually around 42% butterfat but I believe that the term "manufacturers cream" is not regulated by the FDA so it isn't guaranteed what percent it is besides what the producer says...Manufacturers cream is usually only made for professional settings as you can tell because you can't buy it in store...

The creams after that are

Double Cream -  48% butterfat

clotted cream -  55% butterfat

These two are primarily available in Europe and only online for people in the USA...

If you are doing truffles heavy cream or manufacturers cream is acceptable...

Robert

Chocolate Forum

Thanks for the info! So why don't people use manufacturing cream instead of heavy cream?

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I don't think it's readily available. I asked my food service supplier and they don't carry it. I'm curious as to where others get it.


Ilene

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I have had one distributor that had it available but Beanie is right...a lot of places don't carry it...If you are going to use large large quantities then sometimes you can get it made for you but other than that you have to find a supplier which can be hard to do...

Robert

Chocolate Forum

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I don't think it's readily available. I asked my food service supplier and they don't carry it. I'm curious as to where others get it.

I see it all over the place. I have even seen it at Smart and Final. It's also available at Restaurant Depot and I believe from Sysco as well. I even bought it in half gallon containers.


Edited by ChristopherMichael (log)

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I use mfg cream a lot.

It seems to be about the same fat% (based on the nutritional labels' fat and calorie values)

It is much cheaper than heavy cream at Smart & Final. But since it isn't homogenized as well it will spoil much faster. I haven't noticed a decrease in bon bon shelf life but the whole cream definitely has a shorter shelf life. It will also separate a little over time so keep an eye on that as well.

I also use it in sauces where it seems to make a smoother finish for me.

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Homogenized simply means that the fat won't separate out; it has nothing to do with shelf life.


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Homogenized simply means that the fat won't separate out; it has nothing to do with shelf life.

my bad. most whipping and heavy cream is "ultra-pasteurized" which is what extends its shelf life. I've never seen manufacturers cream that has been "ultra-pasteurized." Homogenization keeps the fat molecules apart so the don't separate and helps reduce likelihood of it tasting rancid.

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I buy it at Smart & Final, it comes in half gallon cartons. I use it for making clotted cream, cream cheese, butter, cream fraiche, etc.

Ultra-homogenized cream simply will not form curds, no matter what one does. If you try to make clotted cream with it, it does not form the solid thick and smooth curd on top of the cream, it becomes grainy and is not at all appetizing.

When available, I buy raw milk and cream and pasteurize it myself (I have an automatic electric home pasteurizer).

It does not keep as long as the market brands of heavy cream. I buy it only when I am prepared to use it immediately.

I have found that it whips up greater in volume than the regular stuff and it seems to be much more stable, holding much longer in the fridge, without weeping liquid into the bottom of the bowl. However, I usually ladle it into a steel colander with very fine holes set onto a tray. It will hold for several hours this way.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I never seen other type of heavy cream around here ( colorado ) but I use a local cream and its the thickest I have ever seen around , plus hormons free and has 40% fat .I like it a lot expecially because is local and I really think ios the best around here.


Vanessa

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It must be used more frequently (and much more readily available) in So Cal than in the Phila area. I've never seen it at the Restaurant Depot here. I wonder what it is about it that makes it more popular out there?


Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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My local cheesemaker just gave me a bag of frozen cream that he skimmed. He guesses it is about 80% butterfat. I would like to make a ganache with it, but not sure whether to dilute down, or follow a butter ganache recipe. Anyone with experience making ganache with really heavy cream? I know I could add milk and thin it down, but I would like to take advantage of the butterfat as is.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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I'd probably do something closer to a butter ganache with it.

Considering that butter itself is around 80% butterfat, that seems like the way to go. Or you could whip it up a bit and go ahead and make butter with it. Edited to add: if you can't whip previously frozen cream, could you still make butter out of it :huh: ?

Is the cream solid enough to seem like it really is that high, or is it more liquid?


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

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I'd probably do something closer to a butter ganache with it.

Considering that butter itself is around 80% butterfat, that seems like the way to go. Or you could whip it up a bit and go ahead and make butter with it. Edited to add: if you can't whip previously frozen cream, could you still make butter out of it :huh: ?

Is the cream solid enough to seem like it really is that high, or is it more liquid?

It is thick like toothpaste.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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how about just eating it with a spoon! :wub:


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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I just read this thread and had a couple of questions of my own about whipping cream.

If I want to infuse a savory flavor into the cream would it be best to start with a higher cream, say 45% and "thin it out" or should I risk heating it? I'm a little wary of mathematics (high school trauma) and don't really know how to about gauging how much water to add to equal X percent of cream fat for the whipping.

I'd also like to know if it's feasible to whip a small about of vegetable puree into whipped cream and have it be stable. If it's doable is there a ratio of puree to cream I should be aware of or any special methods you can suggest? I really want to make a light and fluffy vegetable flavored cream to fill cream puffs or pipe onto frico.

Cheers,

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If you're talking about warm or cold infusing flavors into the cream by adding what you want to infuse, heating (or not), removing the infusion item and rechilling the cream (if heated), yes, it whips just fine. I can't vouch for everything but everything I've tried has worked. If you want to fold in puree and aren't opposed to a tiny amount of gelatin just whip the cream, mix the hydrated gelatin into the puree and fold it in. More of a mousse than a whipped cream but it works fine. I did a honey carrot mousse and a buttered peas mousse that way with no problems. Minus the gelatin (or some other stabilizer), it won't hold up too long with the puree folded in. As for adding the puree then whipping, I haven't tried it.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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If you're talking about warm or cold infusing flavors into the cream by adding what you want to infuse, heating (or not), removing the infusion item and rechilling the cream (if heated), yes, it whips just fine. I can't vouch for everything but everything I've tried has worked. If you want to fold in puree and aren't opposed to a tiny amount of gelatin just whip the cream, mix the hydrated gelatin into the puree and fold it in. More of a mousse than a whipped cream but it works fine. I did a honey carrot mousse and a buttered peas mousse that way with no problems. Minus the gelatin (or some other stabilizer), it won't hold up too long with the puree folded in. As for adding the puree then whipping, I haven't tried it.

That's good news Thank you

How much gelatin would you recommend and should I mix it in before I begin to whip it or after I've begun to whip the cream?

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