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Andy Lynes

Food = Low brow entertainment?

7 posts in this topic

In the UK, it would appear that the networks hold a universal view that food related programming must to be pitched to the lowest common denominator, that it must revolve around big personalities or gameshow formats and that it must be produced for the least amount of money possible. As a result, most food programmes are unwatchable, although there are a few notable exceptions.

Am I correct in thinking that the above description tallys to some extent with your experiences in the U.S.? If so, what changes would you like to see to improve matters?

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In the UK, it would appear that the networks hold a universal view that food related programming must to be pitched to the lowest common denominator, that it must revolve around big personalities or gameshow formats and that it must be produced for the least amount of money possible. As a result, most food programmes are unwatchable, although there are a few notable exceptions.

Am I correct in thinking that the above description tallys to some extent with your experiences in the U.S.? If so, what changes would you like to see to improve matters?

All together now...My name is Matthew Stillman. I was fired from Food Network on October 11, 2000. My experiences and recollections refer only to the time I was at Food Network and cannot be construed as accurate or as factual or referring to anytime beyond the time of my gainful employment. In no way do I intend to defame or disparage Food Network or any individual connected to the organization. In this post I do not mean to suggest that Food Network either has or does not have any of the qualities I will describe in their programming.

some things I think make good television shows

-breaking standard formats/inventing or starting to invent new ones

-thinking that the viewer is smart and exploiting that intelligence and inquisitiveness. make tv to the top of your intelligence.

-giving shows that have promise enough money to become themselves. sometimes a little less money can inspire more creative solutions...sometimes.

-creating hip patterns

-assume the viewer is interested

-believe what you are making is cool

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"giving shows that have promise enough money to become themselves. sometimes a little less money can inspire more creative solutions...sometimes."

A prelude to independent food tv, i'm game. Now thats food tv worth watching. Any chefs up for something other than Ron Popeel's hair in a can commercials at 1 am after they get off work, I know I am. Possibly 2 million other cooks that fall into the same time slot. How about "This evening (or morning) we explore the mystery of atomizers and cooking fish on rocks in front of the guest.


Future Food - our new television show airing 3/30 @ 9pm cst:

http://planetgreen.discovery.com/tv/future-food/

Hope you enjoy the show! Homaro Cantu

Chef/Owner of Moto Restaurant

www.motorestaurant.com

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In the UK, it would appear that the networks hold a universal view that food related programming must to be pitched to the lowest common denominator, that it must revolve around big personalities or gameshow formats

Having not been subjected to a flood of them, I actually think a food gameshow COULD be entertaining. Do ANY of them in your market work?


Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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Not really, no. If you compare them to pure gameshows, which I happen to like a great deal, they don't compare. They suffer from having to compromise the food content with the game aspect and neither is improved by the marriage. It becomes all about the participating chefs "personality" which, when exposed to a TV camera, quickly degenerates into a series of catchphrases,verbal tics and mannerisms. Not a pretty sight.

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some things I think make good television shows

-breaking standard formats/inventing or starting to invent new ones

-thinking that the viewer is smart and exploiting that intelligence and inquisitiveness. make tv to the top of your intelligence.

-giving shows that have promise enough money to become themselves. sometimes a little less money can inspire more creative solutions...sometimes.

-creating hip patterns

-assume the viewer is interested

-believe what you are making is cool

Ooh, that could almost be a mission statement for a food network couldn't it? How about "eGullet TV"?

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Can I play the curmudgeon? That's something else missing from FN. Some sourpuss to poo poo food trends...It'd be cool. I could gripe and bitch and moan only to have things pushed in my face. Like I could go up to Trio and eat, and sit there trembling like a wet cat as chefg was floodlit with a Friday the 13th grin on his face, flood lit from behind. How bout that?

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