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Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 1)


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I've used silicon dome molds for marshmallows and they've worked very well if sprayed with non-stick spray. However, the one you linked to seems a little silly to me. Seems like it would be easier and faster just to pipe out ropes and cut to size.

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Thanks for the link! They have some great flavour ideas. It makes me want to run into the kitchen and start experimenting!  :biggrin:

If you do start experimenting, can you start with the caramel???!!! And let us know!! They do look fantastic...

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As you can see in the picture I used my muffin scoop which is egg shaped to form the depressions in the cornstarch.  Once the hot syrup was incorporated and I could see some thickening in the mixture, I scooped out marshmallow into the cornstarch molds, then topped with a bit more cornstarch. 

After they have sat for a couple of hours I'll dip them in some tempered dark chocolate. 

Kerry,

You mentioned using egg whites, so you used a different recipe than nightscotsman's, is this correct? Also, in order to scoop the marshmallow into your cornstarch molds, you stopped whipping before the mixture was cool/firm? I'm wanting to attempt a similar method of molding and I was wondering how this affected the actual setting up of the marshmallows. They look great chocolate dipped, so I assume they were fine (firm enough) to dip. Please elaborate on your recipe and the process.

Thanks also for the photos!

Regards,

Alana

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Kerry,

You mentioned using egg whites, so you used a different recipe than nightscotsman's, is this correct? Also, in order to scoop the marshmallow into your cornstarch molds, you stopped whipping before the mixture was cool/firm? I'm wanting to attempt a similar method of molding and I was wondering how this affected the actual setting up of the marshmallows. They look great chocolate dipped, so I assume they were fine (firm enough) to dip. Please elaborate on your recipe and the process.

Thanks also for the photos!

Regards,

Alana

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making marshmallows gelatin free thought...

I have a packet of universal pectin staring at me.  Has anyone tried pectiin in making marshmallows?

I haven't ... but I just got a case of unflavoured, non-animal, non-fish based jello in. It's on my to-do list to try them again using this stuff. I had no luck with agar - but a fish based gelatin worked. I'll report back if it works.

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Kerry, thanks for the response. I have the TimeLife book and made the marshmallows from it many moons ago. I remember them being incredibly rubbery...I'll try the recipe with your adjustments.

Again, thanks for writing about your experiences! Great ideas for Easter...

Regards,

Alana

Kerry,

You mentioned using egg whites, so you used a different recipe than nightscotsman's, is this correct? Also, in order to scoop the marshmallow into your cornstarch molds, you stopped whipping before the mixture was cool/firm? I'm wanting to attempt a similar method of molding and I was wondering how this affected the actual setting up of the marshmallows. They look great chocolate dipped, so I assume they were fine (firm enough) to dip. Please elaborate on your recipe and the process.

Thanks also for the photos!

Regards,

Alana

Alana,

I used the recipe from Time Life The Good Cook - Candy with some adaptation

I'll copy it into recipeGullet, but by weight it is

450 grams sugar

20 grams glucose (white corn syrup)

125 grams water

40 grams gelatin (next time I'll try 30 grams to get a bit more tender)

125 grams water (to soak gelatin) - here I replaced part with 1/2 cup strawberry puree)

1/4 tsp orange flower water (I used rose water with strawberry)

60 grams egg whites

Soak gelatin in cool water +/- puree. Heat in microwave for about 30 secs to melt. Boil water, sugar and glucose to 127 C. Meanwhile start egg whites whipping. Add melted gelatin to hot syrup. Pour down side of pan while whipping at high speed. As soon as you see the mixture is thickening you can put it into the starch molds.

It sets up just fine in a couple of hours. I brush off the extra starch with a clean pastry brush before dipping in chocolate. They are firm enough to dip easily. I don't use dipping forks, I use an old fashioned method of dipping with my fingers.

Kerry

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I would love to produce something like Hammond's Mitchell Sweets.  It is a marshmallow surounded by caramel.

Any ideas?

mitchellsweets1.jpg

You'd have to perfect your caramel recipe to achieve that. It would have to be at the right degree of being 'set' when you place your marshmellow on to it. So it's flexible, yet not too soft so it won't firm up when set.

But basicly if you pour it out into sheets, then you'd lay a strip of marshmellow down it, roll/or wrap the caramel around the marshmellow, cut the seam, then slice into individual pieces. You can see the over lap of the caramel sheet if you look at the candy on the top of the pile, look at it's lower left side.

I've yet to perfect my caramel making to achieve something like this. I can't get a thermometer relable enough. I'd definately call this a very advanced skill. If you could buy caramel sheets or that 'perfect' caramel it would be easier. How about those caramel sheets they sell for caramel apples.........do they still sell those?

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Thanks Wendy,

I actually do have a caramel recipe that works almost every time and that will stay somewhat flexible in a sheet.

My recipe makes a half sheet about 3/4 of an inch thick. Maybe if I pour out some onto a full sheet pan (or even a little onto a silpat for a test), that might work.

I will have to give it a try. I do not think it is something I would make for my business since Hammonds are so good and just down the road an hour from me in Denver. But it would be nice to make my own instead of paying $1 a piece!

Thanks again!

Patrick Sikes

www.MyChocolateJournal.com

A new chocolate review community

PS I Love You Fine Chocolates

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I came across this website. Interesting flavor combinations. The ingredients list looks like the recipe many here have tried. Look at the price - 5.40 for 4pcs which is 2 to 3 ozs total. Wow!

I'd never pay that kind of money for sugar and gelatine, no matter how gourmet....especially now I know how easy it is to make marshmallows in the comfort of your own home.

I had a stab at making caramel flavour marshmallows. Basically I used the canonical strawberry mallow recipe (minus orange flower water), but replaced the strawberry puree with the same amount of thick caramel syrup (350 g sugar cooked to VERY dark, add 1 1/4 dl. boiling water - use warm in mallow recipe - not hot - as it sets to very gooey). When I was done whippipng, I swirled in a bit of the syrup to try and mimic the 'plushpuffs'.

gallery_29514_1165_822439.jpg

The result is reasonably caramelly and very tasty, a bit denser than the strawberry variety and AMAZINGLY sticky, much stickier than the other varieties I've made. It stuck to the foil, to the knife, to my hands, and I managed to get some in my hair - I may have to get the scissors out. Once my children get hold of them, they (the children) will be easy to control, as they will be firmly stuck to the dining table. The marshmallow splits where there is more than a tiny amount of swirl, hence the less than smooth surface on the chaps, but it adds a very nice, strong caramel flavour.

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I would love to produce something like Hammond's Mitchell Sweets.  It is a marshmallow surounded by caramel.

Any ideas?

mitchellsweets1.jpg

I've yet to perfect my caramel making to achieve something like this. I can't get a thermometer relable enough. I'd definately call this a very advanced skill. If you could buy caramel sheets or that 'perfect' caramel it would be easier. How about those caramel sheets they sell for caramel apples.........do they still sell those?

Peter's caramel loafs are consistently soft and easy to work with and the taste is nearly identical to Hammond's Sweets.

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I'm obsessed with chocolate covered marshmallows too--but I'm more obsessed with the eating component of the project, rather than the making component.

I would like to offer up my services as a taster in the test kitchen. The talent here astounds me and I'd like to pitch in and do my part.

Ellen Shapiro

www.byellen.com

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I'm obsessed with chocolate covered marshmallows too--but I'm more obsessed with the eating component of the project, rather than the making component.

I would like to offer up my services as a taster in the test kitchen. The talent here astounds me and I'd like to pitch in and do my part.

Ellen,

Where do you live? I've got a whole lot of stuff to be tasted around here. The latest is my made from scratch bittersweet chocolate - fruity, not the greatest finish, but not bad for a first try. I'm making white chocolate right now.

Kerry

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I've yet to perfect my caramel making to achieve something like this. I can't get a thermometer relable enough. I'd definately call this a very advanced skill. If you could buy caramel sheets or that 'perfect' caramel it would be easier. How about those caramel sheets they sell for caramel apples.........do they still sell those?

That's a great idea, Wendy! I happened to see them in the produce section just tonight. I'll have to keep it in mind for a future project.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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  • 3 weeks later...

Anyone make marshmallows without a machine? I'm in the process of developing a recipe with specialized expensive ingredients and need to make small amounts at a time. A few tablespoons of marshmallow won't whip well in my KA.

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what is the point of making only a couple tablespoons of marshmallows? Thats like trying to cook a couple tablespoons of sugar to softball stage, practically impossible.

Just make a large enough batch that you can control.

And why do you need "specialized expensive ingredients" when all you need is egg whites, sugar, and gelatine?

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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what is the point of making only a couple tablespoons of marshmallows?  Thats like trying to cook a couple tablespoons of sugar to softball stage, practically impossible.

Just make a large enough batch that you can control.

And why do you need "specialized expensive ingredients" when all you need is egg whites, sugar, and gelatine?

If you've got a thin tall cooking vessel, cooking a couple of tablespoons of sugar to a soft ball stage is no problem. I spent a lot of time finding that vessel because of the amount of experimentation I do with candymaking.

Edited by scott123 (log)
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When you mentioned the tall, narrow vessel for sugar, I immediately thought of using some type of immersion blender but outfitted with a whisk-type attachment. I've never made the marshmallows myself, so this could be completely off base, but perhaps you could use a handheld cordless drill with a whisk "bit" originally from a handheld mixer attachment? Or a dentist's drill - but I have no clue where you'd find a tiny enough whisk to use as a beater!

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They sell very small hand whisks at JB Prince that could be fitted onto the head of a drill pretty easilly (I imagine). You'd need a pretty serious drill though, KA motors are built for sustained running.

Now you have to tell us what ultra-lux ingredients you're making these marshmallows with, considering the bulk of marshmallows are typically the cheapest ingredients going. I'm guessing truffle marshmallows?

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i suppose its doable, but having burned out two small hand blenders making marshmallows, i cant imagine how long its going to need to get the right airiness by hand.

Id suggest using machine power, and make sure you use something with a good strong motor or it will burn out!!

the other problem i would have with a very small batch is that i find no matter how fast i work, the last bit of marshmallow that is in direct contact with the both the cooking and mixing vessels is harder and less airy than the rest and is fit only for the bin. i never mix it into the rest of the marshmallow mix because it degrades the quality (similar to the situation you get with caramel). with a very small batch im afraid you're likely to just get the 'bad' bits.

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