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As implied in another thread I now have a Kuvings EVO820 slow juicer.  There is eGullet love to go around for citrus juicers, centrifugal juicers, Champion juicers -- but none for Kuvings and similar single auger vertical technology.  Herewith I hope to remedy the lack.

 

Kuvings11212020.png

 

Mixers shown for scale.  The Kuvings is not light but I can lift it and there is a convenient handle in the rear.  Assembly was easy but when I applied power, nothing happened.  To spare some histrionics, observe the red dot below the word "closed".  To function the red dot must be below the || symbol to the right of the word "closed".  Now we know.

 

Fit of the parts is excellent, as it should be for the price.  The included recipe book is more useful than the half a dozen or more juicer books I've had out from the library.  For a first experiment I chose celery juice.  The ingredients are three stalks of celery and one apple.  The feed tube of the Kuvings is large enough to have accommodated the apple whole.  I cut mine in quarters though.  Kuvings specifies to remove the stem but juice the apple with skin and seeds for extra nutrients.

 

The machine juiced the apple and the celery in five minutes.  I was going slowly though.  Cleanup took ten minutes, probably because I missed the step of running rinse water through the mechanism.  One tip:  before disassembly be sure you have some free surface to put down the pieces.  Otherwise you feel pretty stupid wandering around the kitchen holding wet juicer parts.

 

So how was the juice?

 

Juice11212020.png

 

The juice was lovely, better than I might have hoped.  No foam or pulp to mar the texture.  If anything I thought it might be improved by a touch of salt.  So I added a few shakes of Tabasco and two ounces of Wray & Nephew Overproof.  This was clearly a mistake.  The best that can be said, I downed the concoction without throwing up.  Sad waste of good ingredients.  The Kuvings recipe cannot be blamed.  The recipe book includes alcoholic beverages but this was not one.

 

What else can one do with a slow juicer?  I have in mind to try orgeat.

 

 

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i've not used one of these but presumably the slower it works the less risk of heat and oxidation to affect the flavour.

 

to that end i wonder if anyone has come up with a vacuum juicer before

 

edit: presumably they can (but not necessarily are) quieter.

Edited by jimb0 (log)
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I've had a Waring juicer for years.  It is loud and dangerous, and jumps around on the table.  It does juice fruit such as apples, except that it is then a pain to clean.  The Kuvings is quiet and there is less froth.  OK, I'd say so far there is no froth.  Kuvings makes a vacuum blender but I don't think they have a vacuum juicer.

 

This afternoon I juiced up some old hairy carrots.  Slimy too, but I washed them.  And ginger that was to the point of being soft.  Clean up was easier because I remembered the injunction to rinse the mechanism out with water first.  I like that there are no sharp parts.  Carrots and ginger were not a combination from the book.  Taste was medicinal healthful.

 

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker
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This afternoon before work I made a recipe I saw on the Williams Sonoma site:  golden beets, apple, and an inch of ginger.  This was like ambrosia.  Unfortunately I was timing how long it took and I neglected to put a glass under the juicer spout.

 

From starting to prep the produce to cleaning the kitchen floor it was almost 30 minutes.

 

Normally I do not eat before work, but I must say, I felt I had more energy today.  Maybe there is something to this juicing business.

 

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7 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

This afternoon before work I made a recipe I saw on the Williams Sonoma site:  golden beets, apple, and an inch of ginger.  This was like ambrosia.  Unfortunately I was timing how long it took and I neglected to put a glass under the juicer spout.

 

From starting to prep the produce to cleaning the kitchen floor it was almost 30 minutes.

 

Normally I do not eat before work, but I must say, I felt I had more energy today.  Maybe there is something to this juicing business.

 

Maybe there is something in cleaning the kitchen floor?

 

Seriously - you don't need recipes to make juice, do you? Go with the flow!  Except, do that into a glass.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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8 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

This afternoon before work I made a recipe I saw on the Williams Sonoma site:  golden beets, apple, and an inch of ginger. 

 

 

I'd forgotten for a moment which thread I was reading, and thought "Hmmm...interesting salad!"

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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