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DanM

Smoked Beef

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One of the surprises from our move to Switzerland is the availability of kosher charcuterie. Sausages of all types, confit, mousse, rietttes, etc... One of the recent finds is this block of smoked beef. It has a nice fat layer in the middle. Any thoughts on how to use it? Should I slice it thin and then fry?

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated.


Edited by DanM (log)

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Going to need a little more info then just "smoked beef"

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Here is a picture of the piece I bought. The package simply says Boeuf fumé from Buchinger.

Smoked beef.jpg

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I think I'd treat it like proscuitto. Just slice and eat.

 

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51 minutes ago, FeChef said:

I think i would treat it as bacon.

That was my first thought.

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Looks good enough to slice and eat.  Add some to a sauce or dropped on to pizza.

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It was not edible raw... too tough and the fat layer was unpleasant.

 

On 4/5/2018 at 8:40 PM, gfweb said:

Looks like they suggest a braise http://buchinger.fr/product.php?id_product=113

 

I was planning on braising a turkey roll for dinner in a stew of random veg, canned tomatoes, wine, and herbs. I pulled out a little into a small pan and braised this chunk of cow... It was perfect if not just a little over done after an hour. 

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