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aperture

Is a "bullet cake" a thing?

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Last August I ate dinner at a place called Ester in Sydney. Dessert was something listed on the menu as "chocolate liquorice bullet cake". It was a normal-looking slice of chocolate cake with 2-3 layers, a dense (but, I think, not flourless) texture, and a wonderful chocolate/liquorice flavor.

 

My question: does "bullet cake" actually mean something here? Googling turns up various gun-themed cakes, which is something completely different.

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1 hour ago, jmacnaughtan said:

I don't know it, but it might be worth a shot.

 

Aaaauuuugggghhh.

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The caliber of these answers is amazing.  I'd like to help but I just draw a blank.  

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1 minute ago, IowaDee said:

The caliber of these answers is amazing.  I'd like to help but I just draw a blank.  

GGGGGRRRRROOOOAAAANNNN

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Sorry but I just had to give it my best shot!:D

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chocolate bullets are (apparently) an Australian confectionery. A small licorice tube coated in chocolate.

 

They're freakin delicious.

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It triggers no memories for me.

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Oh, dear sweet baby Jesus. It's too much. It's just too much. 

 

My best shot isn't even on the target, so I won't take it.

 

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Do you substitute gun powder for baking powder?

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1 hour ago, Porthos said:

Do you substitute gun powder for baking powder?

 

It must be loaded with the stuff, otherwise it might just go off half-cocked.

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11 minutes ago, lesliec said:

Shoot, you guys are really rifling your punsacks!

 

I know.  I normally recoil from scraping the bottom of the barrel like this, but I've had a thread like this in my sights for a while.

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Posted (edited)

I read that in the 1880's in Tombstone, an individual serving of booze cost the same as a bullet and bartenders would accept a bullet from poor cowboys for a small glass. That is how it came to be called a shot of whiskey. It is possibly how getting a shot came to be called "buying a round"


Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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13 hours ago, jmacnaughtan said:

 

I know.  I normally recoil from scraping the bottom of the barrel like this, but I've had a thread like this in my sights for a while.

We need a groan emoji here faster than a speeding bullet. 

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Posted (edited)

@Keychris, thanks for the tip on chocolate bullets. That's almost certainly it.

 

Everybody else, thanks for the puns and fun facts.


Edited by aperture (log)

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Norm Matthews said:

I read that in the 1880's in Tombstone, an individual serving of booze cost the same as a bullet and bartenders would accept a bullet from poor cowboys for a small glass. That is how it came to be called a shot of whiskey. It is possibly how getting a shot came to be called "buying a round"

 

 

Amusing tale, bu sadly, a myth. The expression 'shot' meaning a portion of booze was in use 200 years before then. A 'round of drinks' is even earlier.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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On 8/03/2018 at 9:05 AM, Anna N said:

We need a groan emoji here faster than a speeding bullet. 

What do you need an emoji for?  You're a groan woman!

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