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Chuck Eye Steaks - Finding Them


Porthos
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Same here. Given the high prices for imported meat, chuck eye "steaks" (her usually termed "roll") are one of the more affordable options (lower row, next to the oxtail). Of course, most of the local population will try to to cook it like a steak and then bit a bit disappointed with the shoe sole-type texture.

 

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3 hours ago, TicTac said:

How does one cook a chuck eye steak different say, than a rib eye?

I sous vide it for 24 hrs @ 56°C. I have never attempted to cook it any other way. It is certainly not appropriate for the same methods you might use for a ribeye. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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There is a youtube video of someone by the name of Jimmy Kerstein butchering a whole beef chuck roll.  He has a bunch of videos showing how to butcher various cuts.  It seems he is the author of a book called The Butchers Guide - An Inside View.  To find the video search Youtube for beef chuck roll how to with his name.  I came across him this morning while googling for info on the chuck eye.

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@TicTac  

 

at some point the Glories of SV'd will Speak to You !

 

simple Zip-bags  etc

 

that's the Good News !

 

on the Flip Side 

 

after a trial as above

 

you will kick yourself for waiting so long

 

just saying

 

suprise.gif.75333cda28b587e538f7e705bdb39842.gif

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Im a bit keen on whether the chuck eye appears on the 7-Bone

 

that might b e a hard to find item these days :

 

7 blade chuck

 

Why ?

 

when I started cooking for myself

 

I used to get the 7.

 

at least 1 or more thick

 

I cooked it on the weekends as my mother cooked

 

" Swiss Steak "

 

mashed potatoes etc.

 

later I learned that all the blade ( under the scapula ) might be cut out and used as a

 

"" Steak ""

 

thank you

 

madeleine kamman

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I hear you, rotuts and most likely your observation is accurate.

 

However with 2 boys under 4 and a third on the way, time is scarce and my ability to dive into new toys/projects, similarly so.

 

Perhaps one day.... :)

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@TicTac  

 

correct for now

 

however ?

 

do you go by the Deli Counter and buy thinly sliced meats ?

 

for sandwiches etc ?

 

well

 

you can easily make that stuff

 

much cheaper and w/o those add ins

 

then freeze them 

 

and have then every day for your

 

Children

 

and your self.

 

The Dawn always Rises.

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On 7/2/2017 at 8:19 PM, IndyRob said:

 

I hate to disagree, but that's not true in this part of the country.  Not only are they routinely cut into steaks, here's an advertised special.

 

 

Interesting ... I've never seen that in my neck of the woods. 

 

Once or twice I've seen "chuck steaks" but stayed away having no idea what it was.

Notes from the underbelly

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9 hours ago, Anna N said:

I sous vide it for 24 hrs @ 56°C. I have never attempted to cook it any other way. It is certainly not appropriate for the same methods you might use for a ribeye. 

 

Anna and others. I cook my chuck eye steaks for about 4 hours at 56 C. Sincere question. What difference(s) can I expect for 24 hours in the bath?

Edited by Porthos (log)

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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8 hours ago, Porthos said:

 

Anna and others. I cook my chuck eye steaks for about 4 hours at 56 C. Sincere question. What difference(s) can I expect for 24 hours in the bath?

 

 I cannot answer that since I have never tried to cook them for only four hours. If you are happy with the results then I would stick with it. If you think there might be some improvement then try the 24 hours once.  (Now though  I am beginning to question my notes and I don't have them here with me so it's possible either my notes or my memory are faulty.)  I do hope someone else chimes in here.

 

 Edited it to say I just did a search on eG and 24 hours 56° is my standard treatment of a chuck eye.

Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I have decided to do chuck eye steaks for our Independence Day dinner. Decided to do them about 20 minutes ago. They will go for 10 hours at 56 C. It will be interesting to see how they come out compared to my typical 4 hours.

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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When I've done a whole chuck roll cut into steaks, I've gone 48 hours at 55C and gotten excellent results. My sense is that 36 hours would be enough and would give juicier results, at least if you're dealing with high-grade, well marbled meat. I'm surprised to hear that 10 hours works well. 

 

I reported on my method here. It includes dry-aging and an unusual approach to pre-cooking to enhance enzymatic flavor development.

Notes from the underbelly

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rotuts - I typically do not buy deli meats as they are full of (imo) crap that my kids don't need.  Typically I will make extra chicken and use that for sandwiches, etc.

 

Back to the Chuck Eye topic - was at Cumbrae's today and chatted with one of the butchers.  He basically said a Chuck Eye is essentially the end part of a Rib Eye.  He said preparation methods should be the same as a Rib Eye.  Loved the fact that it was 1/3 of the price of the 6 week Rib Eye I bought as well.  Going to do a side by side comparison and will report back.

 

 

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Its my understanding

 

from " Some Folks N. of the Border "

 

that Cumbrae''s  might not allow pictures

 

sad , but good !

 

id go nuts

 

maybe ask politely ?

 

love to see what your C's Chuck eye looks like

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Happy to ask next time I am there.

 

No harm in taking pictures of what I bought though - might do a mini-blog of our trip to the cottage so I will ensure to include some.

 

Interestingly enough, they don't age the chuck eye steaks, but typically use them for chuck (cubed) meat or ground for burgers.  Not nearly as much marbling on it as the Deckle heavy rib eye I bought, but I can't complain at $11 (vs $30 for the 6 week Rib Eye).

 

 

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@TicTac  we are going to be in southern Ontario this weekend and are thinking of going to Cumbrae's at either the Dundas or Bayview location.  Are all the stores the same?  Do they sell heritage pork?  Also, was that $11 per pound for the chuck eye?  

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1 hour ago, TicTac said:

He basically said a Chuck Eye is essentially the end part of a Rib Eye. 

 

Yeah! That!

As I understand it, rib-eyes are cut from the 6th through the 12th ribs—the chuck-eye is cut off the 5th+ rib.

I buy well marbled chuck-eyes only and reverse sear or broil under the charcoal 'salamander.'

They turn out great. :)

 

 

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

@TicTac  we are going to be in southern Ontario this weekend and are thinking of going to Cumbrae's at either the Dundas or Bayview location.  Are all the stores the same?  Do they sell heritage pork?  Also, was that $11 per pound for the chuck eye?  

ElsieD - Truth be told I have only been to the Bayview location as I am coming from Thornhill.  I have heard that other locations have more prepared food options, but my guess is the meat selection is fairly similar. 

 

They do sell heritage pork.  The $11PP was for the Chuck Eye.  If you have specific request I would suggest calling ahead - i.e. if you want an 8 week aged steak, call ahead.  I often have them vac pack lots of meat for me and call ahead as otherwise I would be waiting there 20-30 minutes easily - and that is never a good recipe as I just end up browsing and buying far more than what I had intended!

 

Edit - If you are going, I would also highly recommend the churned salted butter from Quebec that they sell - get that, then go down the street (if you go to the Bayview location) to Rahier and buy a few baguettes (and perhaps some dessert for later on) and thank me later :P

 

 

Edited by TicTac (log)
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