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How do they do that? (the bonbon thread)


kevnick80
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It doesn’t have to be complicated. It could probably be done by folding in a caramel in your nougat and just roll it out in a frame. Or it could be a simple version of leaf croquant.

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On 3/30/2022 at 11:59 PM, ChristianD said:

The same question was asked a few weeks ago. I once carried out a test with stamps. As soon as I find the time, I will publish a tutorial in the Facebook group "https://www.facebook.com/groups/1413728595685917". 

!Foto163.thumb.jpg.b8b83ef740429e9e2477fa46fb3efa6a.jpg

Hello, did you published the tutorial in the group , if yes can you send me the link please .

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I would guess some water/alcohol, I got a similar effect you can see in the beginning of the video when putting my failed molds in my sink a few years back thinking; "it would be interesting to get a pattern like this."

 

 

image.thumb.png.f567c4fd812ded4960fc56337c7d36b8.png

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1 hour ago, Rajala said:

I would guess some water/alcohol, I got a similar effect you can see in the beginning of the video when putting my failed molds in my sink a few years back thinking; "it would be interesting to get a pattern like this."

 

 

image.thumb.png.f567c4fd812ded4960fc56337c7d36b8.png

Ohhh that makes sense, I think it's done by spraying colored cocoa butter into the molds first then not sure if you let the cocoa butter set or not but then you put it on a steam to get that effect then you let it cool down and wipe away the water, will test it out in the future

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eggs.png.329243a1a9b1ce0dfee5867e71e132bc.png

 

These beautiful eggs are from Monde du Chocolat.  The creator's work is incomparable.  I read somewhere that she does many of her designs by blowing dabs of cocoa butter inside each cavity, but this one looks too "composed" for the randomness of an airbrush.  How do you think this design was accomplished?  Sponges?  A fluffy paint brush (it's difficult to keep a brush fluffy after even a small amount of cocoa butter gets in it)?  Finger painting (looks too refined for that, but one never knows)?

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I've seen very small foam-tip tools, I wonder if that's it?

 

To  my very untrained eye, it could also be dabs of color and then a brief puff of compressed air(?) blown on it to "push" it around.

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41 minutes ago, JeanneCake said:

I've seen very small foam-tip tools, I wonder if that's it?

 

To  my very untrained eye, it could also be dabs of color and then a brief puff of compressed air(?) blown on it to "push" it around.

 

I have some foam-tip tools, but they tend to make rather defined areas of color, not the "fluffiness" of this design

 

You second idea is what Monde du Chocolat ordinarily does.  Given the quickness with which cocoa butter hardens, it would take incredible speed--and talent. 

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I was thinking it was just color, not colored cooca butter.  is that even possible?  (I stopped trying to understand chocolate after your tempering lessons, which were very successful - because I can do it! - but it makes me feel like the chocolate is in charge and that's not something I'm used to ;) so I'm sticking to buttercream LOL!)  It (the technique/result) reminds me of the learning curve when doing palette knife flowers in buttercream and how to color it and how to apply it....

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57 minutes ago, JeanneCake said:

I was thinking it was just color, not colored cooca butter.  is that even possible?  (I stopped trying to understand chocolate after your tempering lessons, which were very successful - because I can do it! - but it makes me feel like the chocolate is in charge and that's not something I'm used to ;) so I'm sticking to buttercream LOL!)  It (the technique/result) reminds me of the learning curve when doing palette knife flowers in buttercream and how to color it and how to apply it....

 

I don't think it is possible to add color without having it in cocoa butter.  After the chocolate shell is made, the tempered chocolate in the mold contracts as it crystallizes/cools, and the colored cocoa butter beneath it also contracts, so that they become one and come out of the shell together.  This is all assuming that cocoa butter and chocolate are in temper--and that the chocolate gods are smiling that day.  That contracting process wouldn't work with just food coloring applied to the shell.  The coloring agent must be in an oil-based medium (such as cocoa butter), or the chocolate would seize up when it encountered water-based colorant.

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