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How do they do that? (the bonbon thread)


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16 minutes ago, Haley said:

I tend to get a lot more peaks on my dark chocolate ganaches, so I usually have to go back after the filling is set and use a gloved finger to gently press it down or even use a small angled spatula to scrape off the tip of the peak.

Me too.  I have a tiny little sharp knife that I sometimes use.  I would love to find a tiny angled spatula that would fit into a cavity, but it would have to be so small that there would be no room for the angled part. There must be some tool somewhere that would do it.  The finger approach has the added advantage of heating up the ganache a tiny bit to nudge it into flatness.  I have never been able to figure out why some (not many) dark ganaches self-level and most do not.  Over the years I have been gradually inching up the temp at which I pipe to get as much fluidity as possible without melting the shells.

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18 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Me too.  I have a tiny little sharp knife that I sometimes use.  I would love to find a tiny angled spatula that would fit into a cavity, but it would have to be so small that there would be no room for the angled part. There must be some tool somewhere that would do it.  The finger approach has the added advantage of heating up the ganache a tiny bit to nudge it into flatness.  I have never been able to figure out why some (not many) dark ganaches self-level and most do not.  Over the years I have been gradually inching up the temp at which I pipe to get as much fluidity as possible without melting the shells.

 

I wait until ready to cap, then use a plastic spoon to scoop out the excess ganache. It has the advantage of a convex shape which leaves a concave space in the ganache. I usually end up with one or two peaks per tray and this takes care of them. Someday, I might actually pipe a whole tray without any peaks:).

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Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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20 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Me too.  I have a tiny little sharp knife that I sometimes use.  I would love to find a tiny angled spatula that would fit into a cavity, but it would have to be so small that there would be no room for the angled part. There must be some tool somewhere that would do it.  The finger approach has the added advantage of heating up the ganache a tiny bit to nudge it into flatness.  I have never been able to figure out why some (not many) dark ganaches self-level and most do not.  Over the years I have been gradually inching up the temp at which I pipe to get as much fluidity as possible without melting the shells.

@Jim D. If you are thinking of metal, perhaps there’s an artists palette knife in stainless steel that might work. Dick Blick or Jerry’s Artarama are good sources online. I also remember from my chemistry days we used a “rubber policeman” which fit on the end of a stirring rod. They were of varying stiffness depending on the material.

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6 minutes ago, Douglas K said:

@Jim D. If you are thinking of metal, perhaps there’s an artists palette knife in stainless steel that might work. Dick Blick or Jerry’s Artarama are good sources online. I also remember from my chemistry days we used a “rubber policeman” which fit on the end of a stirring rod. They were of varying stiffness depending on the material.

 

Thanks for those great ideas.  I was about to ask you if there was an alternate term for "rubber policeman," thinking it was an inside term that chemists use and Google would not have heard of it.  But I suppose Google should never be underestimated--multiple sources for such policemen popped up immediately.

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@Jim D. Yes, that’s the actual term! The other possibility from the chemistry world is a stainless steel weighing spatula. Anything with the lab name of course is expensive, but there are possibilities like this: 

https://www.amazon.com/Scoop-Reagent-Stainless-Sampling-Spatulas/dp/B06ZXW9467/ref=pd_lpo_328_img_2/137-3182723-2384069?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B06ZXW9467&pd_rd_r=a996aaae-194e-4cdd-911a-71c795187296&pd_rd_w=ZW9UN&pd_rd_wg=fUmXN&pf_rd_p=7b36d496-f366-4631-94d3-61b87b52511b&pf_rd_r=55C6PFF0MMKXNBNYD623&psc=1&refRID=55C6PFF0MMKXNBNYD623

 

I’m a big fan of repurposing things for other uses. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 9/25/2020 at 10:25 PM, gfron1 said:

That didn't work for me. Devil is in the details I suppose. I'm not sure the swirl is relevant to the effect but I tried a number of different swirls both just on top and over the whole mold. His white spray seems like it was only along the sides so I did some where I only sprayed the edges  and others only spraying straight down from the top with a focused nozzle. Maybe viscosity or saturation plays a role.

IMG_20200925_130926.thumb.jpg.35ed09a1ea6d95b10b6278cd28983842.jpg

IMG_20200925_130930.thumb.jpg.acefc52cc7556a9c02bfe299561524e5.jpg

did you finally understand how it works?

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