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Altay.Oro

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    Ankara, Turkey

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  1. I roughly know the functions that various type of sugars do on the end result of the ganache structure, sweetness, stiffness etc ... but still could not get the exact decision process used for calculating the rigorous amounts of different sugar types to add to the recipes when fine tuning. @Rajala if possible, can you share with us your complete decision process under your choice of sugars and amounts of them used in this ganache formulation?
  2. Same here ... I have molded some chocolate pieces today for my nephews ... downside is ... chocolate becomes slighty overtempered at nights when the room temperature cools down a little bit near to 28 C 😎
  3. I think so ... by the way I got my bag today and it is the same label on the bag.
  4. I want to formulate a ganache recipe with Callebaut Ruby, but can not solve the table below which I got from the Callebaut site ... My rough estimation for the milk fats is % 8 ... then the cocoa fat would be %28 ... and the non fatty cocoa solids would not be % 20? What does "2.5 % FAT FREE COCOA" on the lable mean?
  5. I think it is ok to mold some chocolate bars until 27-28 C for a home chocolatier ... maybe even until 30 C ... of course with a refrigerator for hardening the molded pieces. Enjoy the extended period of time to play and practice with tempered chocolate at the room temperature.
  6. It seems to me as a regional loss of temper, If so, stirring the chocolate a little bit more before molding can be a remedy. Another reason can be ... maybe less likely ... if your mold is thin, you should take into account the heat of your hands.
  7. @Anthony C Very pleasing and pretty, professional looking range of bonbons ... I would not miss that oppurtunity, Just do it ) And ... work hard until buying some equipment and/or employing people.
  8. If there is enough water in the environment to emulsify with oil molecules ... can there be any reason other than the shortage of emulsifier for the failure to emulsify? For example ... when making a low ratio chocolate ganache (1:1 with milk chocolate or even less chocolate), have you ever experienced a difficulty in emulsfying chocolate with cream?
  9. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2cf3nqBzWLs Showing the transfer sheet method of capping bonbons ... starting at 10:45.
  10. I think the contrasty look with the shiny top is very nice.
  11. I guess ... you mean a thin cocoa butter coat with a sprayer first and then the main layer with spatula ... right? Looks promising, but I could not scrape all the chocolate cleanly under the transfer sheet in my first try ... I need to practice more ... thanks.
  12. Thank you ... maybe the piping chocolate on each cavity creates the best result, but it is obviously not so practical for handmade.
  13. I'm not happy with the appearance of the bases of my molded chocolates ... I'm closing them by flattening the poured chocolate on the mold with a spatula. In handmade production, what is the best way to get a really professional look at the bottom of the bonbons?
  14. @shain @Cahoot you should try this ... https://www.imamcagdas.com/anasayfa Even my mom makes occasionally spending hours ... when we want to eat baklava, we mostly order it from Çağdaş. And ... at the end, we always agree that my mom's baklava tastes better than the Çağdaş's baklava :) On the site, there are two types of baklava with a slight difference. Baklava normally contains kaymak. Sold as "dry (kuru) baklava", as far as I know, does not contain kaymak ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaymak
  15. When dipping, I'm getting nearly 5-10 % of my bonbons with air bubbles ... I blow up them by tapping my fork on the surface of the chocolate or to the edge of the melter. As mentioned here ... there seem to be three reasons for excessive air bubbles ... 1. Viscous chocolate, 2. Overtempered chocolate, 3. Excessive stirring ... About stirring ... I do not stir at all when the melted chocolate cools down ... I put it down on a cold surface and I add my seed chocolate when my hands can not feel heat anymore from the melter pot ... I start to stir slowly with a spatula at this moment ... mostly in 5 minutes, and with a minimum amount of stirring, chocolate is ready to use ... check it, if not tempered stir a little bit more and recheck. Additionally, I don't put so much chocolate in melter ... I use 6 lt melter and fill half of it with chocolate ... with less chocolate, I generally observe less air bubbles + more manageable and easily / quickly tempered chocolate.
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