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That small appliance you thought you could not live without ... where is it now?


Anna N
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I have two of the same pealer.  not so fancy, one very old the other old.

 

from VT.

 

no suction cup.  thumb srew clamp.

 

mine cannot make curly  FF, as I understand the term

 

it peels or it peels/ cores and then slices a single 'stand ' of apple, the strand is = to one radius, round and round.

 

if you were to ask it to do a potato, the potato would have to be very smooth.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I have two of the same pealer.  not so fancy, one very old the other old.

 

from VT.

 

no suction cup.  thumb srew clamp.

 

mine cannot make curly  FF, as I understand the term

 

it peels or it peels/ cores and then slices a single 'stand ' of apple, the strand is = to one radius, round and round.

 

if you were to ask it to do a potato, the potato would have to be very smooth.

 

Mine is about twenty years old.  Except for the suction cup I doubt the design has changed much in the last hundred years.

 

You set me off on an archeological expedition to hunt the manual.  I was about to give up but then I found it, albeit a little yellowed.  The company is Back To Basics Products, Inc.  Instructions are given for setting up the machine to make "shoestring potatoes".  Same idea as the apple in my picture but you adjust the blade for a deeper cut.

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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Ever hear of the Farberware Open Hearth Rotisserie? Have one for 40 years that migrated to the garage but yesterday it came out to roast a duck and it was very good.

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Ever hear of the Farberware Open Hearth Rotisserie? Have one for 40 years that migrated to the garage but yesterday it came out to roast a duck and it was very good.

 

 

Yes , they were very popular....in this neck of the woods anyway.

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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Ever hear of the Farberware Open Hearth Rotisserie? Have one for 40 years that migrated to the garage but yesterday it came out to roast a duck and it was very good.

Ever hear of the Farberware Open Hearth Rotisserie? Have one for 40 years that migrated to the garage but yesterday it came out to roast a duck and it was very good.

Fascinating. I googled it and see that they still seem to be available on eBay. Is it not rather a messy way to cook? I have one of the upright rotisseries which was a gift from someone who did not have room for it. I do not use it often but would not give it up because it does a wonderful job of both chickens and ducks. It is, however, fully enclosed.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Ever hear of the Farberware Open Hearth Rotisserie? Have one for 40 years that migrated to the garage but yesterday it came out to roast a duck and it was very good.

I had one for many years until it died from heavy use (mostly ribs).

Then I got this one - the "Ritz" Black Angus that got plenty of use and is still in fine condition.

It's larger than the Farberware and as it is enclosed, there is less grease spatter around it.

I used to use the Farberware outside or in the laundry room as it was easier to clean the washer and dryer than anywhere in the kitchen.

*Ritz Black Angus7.JPG

*Ritz Black Angus3.JPG

*Ritz Black Angus6.JPG

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Julia using a Farberware Rotisserie starting at about 22:40......

 

Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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Ever hear of the Farberware Open Hearth Rotisserie? Have one for 40 years that migrated to the garage but yesterday it came out to roast a duck and it was very good.

 

I have two.  Using one for spare parts as the original motor has long since given out.  One of my favorite appliances.  And it gets a lot more use than the apple peeler.

 

Among other things I use the Farberware for roasting chicken mechoui.  The spit is probably a bit short for goat mechoui.

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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Fascinating. I googled it and see that they still seem to be available on eBay. Is it not rather a messy way to cook? I have one of the upright rotisseries which was a gift from someone who did not have room for it. I do not use it often but would not give it up because it does a wonderful job of both chickens and ducks. It is, however, fully enclosed.

 

If your unit is enclosed, though, are you really doing roasting?

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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If your unit is enclosed, though, are you really doing roasting?

I wouldn't like to say. But I do know that most rotisseries that I am familiar with work in an enclosed environment and that includes the supermarket variety.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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well

 

genuine roasting is by " an open fire "

 

Ie  an old fashioned hearth by the fire,  etc

 

if its enclosed, you get an oven like item  ie baked

 

no worries

 

tasty any way you do it .

 

pat  pat  

The commercial rotissieries used in markets are "enclosed" but the thing is the heat is directed at the meat or poultry being cooked, not distributed throughout the oven as in roasting.  This is similar to broiling and there is always an opening - just as broiling in regular electric ovens requires the oven door to be open a few inches. Note that on the Ritz the front barrier only covers a third of the front and is open at the bottom and the top.   I have one of the vertical roasters, much smaller than my Ritz and it has louvered openings near the bottom and on the top to allow air movement.  I use it mostly for kebabs or game hens. 

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I had just about forgotten about my http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Er5hdut0L._AA160_.jpg Cuisinart Rotisserie Oven.

I used it yesterday to cook a Hutterite (think Amish-type) chicken which I pre-rubbed with seasonings.

It smelled divine while cooking and turned out very, very good.

While my use of this oven is severely limited and its size is huge, it is quite useful.  I don't think I'd buy one again now though, knowing how difficult it is to clean and store.

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MY DW and I received a Farberware Open Hearth Rotisserie as a wedding gift when Carter was still president. We use regularly for several years, less for the rotisserie and more for the broiler mode of use. We still have it but have not used it in years. However, it may come into use again.

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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  • 10 months later...

Yet another small appliance to put into storage when the novelty wears off:

"Star Wars Death Star Waffle Maker"  :cool:  :biggrin: 

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Yet another small appliance to put into storage when the novelty wears off:

"Star Wars Death Star Waffle Maker"  :cool:  :biggrin: 

 

I agree with you on that one, but the comments are very funny!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

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