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JoNorvelleWalker

Drinks! 2014 (Part 2)

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Dub Treo

1 1/2 oz Appleton Reserve (used V/X)

3/4 oz carpano

3/4 oz Aperol

1 dash Whiskey barrel aged bitters

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This weekend:

 

1 oz Rye, Angel's Envy
3/4 oz Jamaican rum, Appleton V/X
1/4 oz Jamaican rum, Smith & Cross
3/4 oz Lemon juice
3/4 oz Honey Ginger Syrup

 

Fun. Mysterious but approachable. Enough depth and funk that you don't miss the Penicillin's Islay float. Good for stumping bartenders re: what the base spirit is.

 

Tonight, just some Clement VSOP neat. Delicious, but it does make me miss Rhum St. James, sadly no longer available stateside.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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We fancied a good old Negroni tonight, but I find we're approaching a Campari crisis.

So a White Negroni; gin (mine), Cocchi Americano and Suze. Quite satisfactory.

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Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
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I'm trying to figure out a drink called the Billy Wilkerson Topper from the great bar Anvil here in Houston. Done right it's like a fluffy, light, not too sweet chartreuse marshmallow. Almost too easy drinking. The menu lists "Panamanian rum" and I'm not really sure what to sub in for that. Here's my working recipe:

 

1.5 oz Don Q Cristal

0.5 oz Wray & Nephew Overproof

1 oz Yellow Chartreuse

3 hard shakes orange flower water

1 egg white

 

The Don Q is from the remainder of a handle for party daiquiris and mojitos. With half an ounce WNOP it's a little rough, but with the full 2:1 DonQ to chartreuse it's too watery. I'd like to find a white rum with more character than the Don Q, but less funk than the WNOP.

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This weekend:

 

1 oz Rye, Angel's Envy

3/4 oz Jamaican rum, Appleton V/X

1/4 oz Jamaican rum, Smith & Cross

3/4 oz Lemon juice

3/4 oz Honey Ginger Syrup

 

Fun. Mysterious but approachable. Enough depth and funk that you don't miss the Penicillin's Islay float. Good for stumping bartenders re: what the base spirit is.

 

This sounds great. Going to have to give this one a try. For the honey ginger syrup, you do a 1:1 honey to water syrup with a few pieces of peeled ginger?

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The menu lists "Panamanian rum" and I'm not really sure what to sub in for that.

 

"Panamanian rum" == Cana Brava.

 

If I am not mistaken.

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For our next round, I ordered off-menu; on FrogPrincesse's suggestion, I tried for a "Cynar That Time We Last Drank Manhattans?" with High West Bourye. The bar was lacking Punt e Mes, but the bartender was undaunted and cobbled together something to try and approximate the flavour. Fortunately, it's hard to go wrong with Cynar + whiskey + herbal liqueurs + maraschino, and the results were very enjoyable.

 

 

 

Glad you enjoyed this.  Thanks for giving it a go.


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I'm trying to figure out a drink called the Billy Wilkerson Topper from the great bar Anvil here in Houston. Done right it's like a fluffy, light, not too sweet chartreuse marshmallow. Almost too easy drinking. The menu lists "Panamanian rum" and I'm not really sure what to sub in for that. Here's my working recipe:

 

1.5 oz Don Q Cristal

0.5 oz Wray & Nephew Overproof

1 oz Yellow Chartreuse

3 hard shakes orange flower water

1 egg white

 

The Don Q is from the remainder of a handle for party daiquiris and mojitos. With half an ounce WNOP it's a little rough, but with the full 2:1 DonQ to chartreuse it's too watery. I'd like to find a white rum with more character than the Don Q, but less funk than the WNOP.

 

Like Jo said, the rum is likely Cana Brava. I like CB, but I find Caliche and Palo Viejo, both distilled by the same people that make Don Q, to be closer in flavor to Havana Club than it is--but full disclosure, I'm a paid representative of the Puerto Rican rum industry, so make of that what you will. (Though I believe Hassouni agrees with me.)

 

Regarding that drink, it's rare to see an egg white drink without some citrus (or vermouth) to help with the emulsion--maybe consider some lemon/lime and simple?

 

 

This sounds great. Going to have to give this one a try. For the honey ginger syrup, you do a 1:1 honey to water syrup with a few pieces of peeled ginger?

 

I just combine premade honey syrup and ginger syrup in equal parts, but that method should work fine as well, as long as the ginger gives enough flavor/bite. I'm considering changing our house ginger syrup recipe to use honey as the sweetener and spare us a step.


Edited by Rafa (log)
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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Thanks, Jo and Rafa, for the rum advice and feedback on the drink. Last thing I need at the moment is another rum to buy, but the Cana Brava sounds quite good from what I've seen online. Based on the tasting notes, it is probably what's in this drink and would play nice with yellow chartreuse generally. I'll look into Caliche and Palo Viejo as well. Availability may play a role here.

 

I agree the lack of citrus is a bit odd--the egg white doesn't really froth a lot, but the Anvil menu lists only these ingredients: Panamanian white rum, yellow chartreuse, orange flower water, egg white. (They spell out use of citrus in other drinks and, anyway, it doesn't taste like it has any.) Flavor-wise, it's not a high acid drink, but is balanced and not droopy. Was thinking that a bit of lemon might go well in a future attempt.

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I agree the lack of citrus is a bit odd--the egg white doesn't really froth a lot, but the Anvil menu lists only these ingredients: Panamanian white rum, yellow chartreuse, orange flower water, egg white. (They spell out use of citrus in other drinks and, anyway, it doesn't taste like it has any.) Flavor-wise, it's not a high acid drink, but is balanced and not droopy. Was thinking that a bit of lemon might go well in a future attempt.

The drink sounds like a play on the Daisy de Santiago with egg white & orange flower water. I would probably add lime juice and simple syrup as Rafa suggested.

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Here are the ratios for the Daisy de Santiago that are recommended in the Bartender's Choice app, if you decide to go in that direction (the link I provided is good for the history of the drink, but seems way too heavy on the Chartreuse): 2 oz rum, 1 oz lime, 3/4 oz simple, barspoon yellow Chartreuse.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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Thanks, Jo and Rafa, for the rum advice and feedback on the drink. Last thing I need at the moment is another rum to buy, but the Cana Brava sounds quite good from what I've seen online. Based on the tasting notes, it is probably what's in this drink and would play nice with yellow chartreuse generally. I'll look into Caliche and Palo Viejo as well. Availability may play a role here.

 

I agree the lack of citrus is a bit odd--the egg white doesn't really froth a lot, but the Anvil menu lists only these ingredients: Panamanian white rum, yellow chartreuse, orange flower water, egg white. (They spell out use of citrus in other drinks and, anyway, it doesn't taste like it has any.) Flavor-wise, it's not a high acid drink, but is balanced and not droopy. Was thinking that a bit of lemon might go well in a future attempt.

 

 

Good luck finding Palo Viejo anywhere. It is distributed and sold in the mainland, but I've never seen it for retail sale anywhere. I have seen Caliche. Caña Brava is harder to find than Caliche, but I have seen it here and there. 

 

I dunno if this belongs in "Understanding Rum" but I did a side by side of Havana Club Añejo 3 Años, Caña Brava, Palo Viejo, Don Q, Flor de Caña, and Brugal Extra Dry Especial or whatever it's called.

 

The Brugal was faintly flavored vodka, plain and simple. Don Q was better, but not by a ton. Flor de Caña was very nice but had a prominent mature coconut aroma and taste that made it stand out from the rest. In the end, Palo Viejo and Caña Brava were the two finalists for "closest runners up to real Cuban rum" - CB has a more complex and mature flavor but is pretty subtle, while the notes in PV might be less complex, but are less subtle and they match Havana Club really closely. Given how cheap Palo Viejo is (when you can get it), it's staying as my go-to "Cuban/Spanish" style light rum. If all you can find is Caña Brava, go for that, because it's still a great product.

 

According to Señor Ambajador, Caliche is just an upmarket variant on Palo Viejo, but I've never tried it (correct me if I'm wrong!)


Edited by Hassouni (log)
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Caliche is designed as a sipping spirit with bonus mixability—an entrant in the weird market category of premium white rums. Like all products labeled "Puerto Rican rum," it's aged for at least a year in American oak barrels; the difference is that the average age of Caliche's component rums is 4-5 years. Serrallés, the company behind Caliche (and Don Q and Palo Viejo, among others), distills both light- and heavy-bodied rums which they blend together for their bottlings. I've tasted the heavy rums on their own, which have a wonderful, ester-y molasses character (like a less funky Wray & Nephew); I detect more of their presence in Caliche and in Palo Viejo than in their other brands. So while I'm not sure that Serrallés would be happy with me describing Caliche as a higher end Palo Viejo (¿Palo Aún Más Viejo?), there's a family resemblance.


Edited by Rafa (log)
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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I dunno if this belongs in "Understanding Rum" but I did a side by side of Havana Club Añejo 3 Años, Caña Brava, Palo Viejo, Don Q, Flor de Caña, and Brugal Extra Dry Especial or whatever it's called.

 

The Brugal was faintly flavored vodka, plain and simple. Don Q was better, but not by a ton. Flor de Caña was very nice but had a prominent mature coconut aroma and taste that made it stand out from the rest. In the end, Palo Viejo and Caña Brava were the two finalists for "closest runners up to real Cuban rum" - CB has a more complex and mature flavor but is pretty subtle, while the notes in PV might be less complex, but are less subtle and they match Havana Club really closely. Given how cheap Palo Viejo is (when you can get it), it's staying as my go-to "Cuban/Spanish" style light rum. If all you can find is Caña Brava, go for that, because it's still a great product.

 

Very nice summary, Hassouni.

Did you get a chance to try Plantation 3 Stars? I think it compares well to Flor de Cana or Havana Club.

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Well, I found Caña Brava on the shelf at my local liquor store, perched next to Caliche. Picked up a liter of the Caña Brava for $26. I guess another location of this store has the Palo Viejo, so I'll grab that soon too. Sounds interesting... and super cheap. Rum in general seems to be a massive value in terms of the quality/intrigue to cost ratio.

 

The Caña Brava is almost definitely what's in this cocktail at the bar. 2 oz rum, 1 oz yellow chartreuse, egg white, and a few shakes orange flower water create an immensely quaffable, rounded, concentrated, and smooth drink. It's got new world rum but feels very "old world" European. Looking forward to trying it with the citrus but this one is complete as is.

 

Thanks for the help and rum lesson, everyone. Learned a lot.


Edited by Fernet-Bronco (log)
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Good luck finding Palo Viejo anywhere. It is distributed and sold in the mainland, but I've never seen it for retail sale anywhere. 

I'm seeing it frequently in southern CT (greater New Haven).  

Time to try tropical cocktails against the seemingly endless winter!

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Very nice summary, Hassouni.

Did you get a chance to try Plantation 3 Stars? I think it compares well to Flor de Cana or Havana Club.

 

Thanks Princesse. No, I just limited it to the whites I had on hand - not counting agricoles and cachaças, or crazy Caribbean overproofs, only stuff made in the style pioneered by Don Facundo.

 

Well, I found Caña Brava on the shelf at my local liquor store, perched next to Caliche. Picked up a liter of the Caña Brava for $26. I guess another location of this store has the Palo Viejo, so I'll grab that soon too. Sounds interesting... and super cheap. Rum in general seems to be a massive value in terms of the quality/intrigue to cost ratio.

 

The Caña Brava is almost definitely what's in this cocktail at the bar. 2 oz rum, 1 oz yellow chartreuse, egg white, and a few shakes orange flower water create an immensely quaffable, rounded, concentrated, and smooth drink. It's got new world rum but feels very "old world" European. Looking forward to trying it with the citrus but this one is complete as is.

 

Thanks for the help and rum lesson, everyone. Learned a lot.

 

That's a really, REALLY good price for Caña Brava. It only comes in L bottles, btw. Palo Viejo is super cheap. The wholesale price on it here is <$10, and I remember getting a few bottles for next to nothing in PR.

 

I'm seeing it frequently in southern CT (greater New Haven).  

Time to try tropical cocktails against the seemingly endless winter!

 

Cool, you won't regret buying it, I'd say it's a worthy rum at even 50% more than what they charge for it.

 

 

By the way, I should note that I have yet to do a daiquiri test with these rums. Not sure if I should include FdC in the running or just stick to HC, CB, and PV. I'll post results in the daiquiri thread, of course!


Edited by Hassouni (log)
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That's a really, REALLY good price for Caña Brava. It only comes in L bottles, btw. Palo Viejo is super cheap. The wholesale price on it here is <$10, and I remember getting a few bottles for next to nothing in PR.

 

My shop's website lists it for $6.50 a liter.

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I made a quasi-Green Flash inspired by FrogPrincesse's posts in the Death & Co thread...

1 1/2 oz Clément VSOP

1/2 oz lemon juice

1/2 tsp Petite Canne cane syrup

1 dash Vieux Carré absinthe

Crémant to top

Very nice. Aged agricole and sparkling wine are lovely together.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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That's a really, REALLY good price for Caña Brava. It only comes in L bottles, btw.

 

Drinkupny has CB for $27.99.  I have to say that in a daiquiri I prefer CB to Plantation 3, though I find Plantation 3 quite acceptable.  Sadly I have never tasted HC to compare.

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This weekend:

 

1 oz Rye, Angel's Envy

3/4 oz Jamaican rum, Appleton V/X

1/4 oz Jamaican rum, Smith & Cross

3/4 oz Lemon juice

3/4 oz Honey Ginger Syrup

 

Fun. Mysterious but approachable. Enough depth and funk that you don't miss the Penicillin's Islay float. Good for stumping bartenders re: what the base spirit is.

 

Tonight, just some Clement VSOP neat. Delicious, but it does make me miss Rhum St. James, sadly no longer available stateside.

 

Will have to give that one a try. I liked the one you posted earlier with AE rye, Cynar, PX Sherry and an absinthe rinse.

 

Didn't know St. James was no longer in the US. I have been finding the Clement Select Barrel to be pretty pleasant. Not quite as good as Clement Single Cask but so far I can't find the single cask in the US unfortunately.


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1 oz Pierre Ferrand 1840 Cognac, bostonapothecary's favorite

1 oz Blume Marillen apricot eau de vie

3/4 oz Lemon juice

3/4 oz Small Hand Foods orgeat

1/4 oz Amaretto (previously Noyaux)

1 dash Ango

Served on crushed ice

 

It's funny, I don't particularly care for apricots on their own or in savory dishes or desserts, but the Blume Marillen is one of my very favorite spirits, and I love the apricot notes (somehow more floral than fruity) I get in the Ferrands and in Borderies Cognacs. I'd add this drink to our menu if the eau de vie weren't so expensive.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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1 oz Pierre Ferrand 1840 Cognac, bostonapothecary's favorite

1 oz Blume Marillen apricot eau de vie

3/4 oz Lemon juice

3/4 oz Small Hand Foods orgeat

1/4 oz Amaretto (previously Noyaux)

1 dash Ango

Served on crushed ice

 

It's funny, I don't particularly care for apricots on their own or in savory dishes or desserts, but the Blume Marillen is one of my very favorite spirits, and I love the apricot notes (somehow more floral than fruity) I get in the Ferrands and in Borderies Cognacs. I'd add this drink to our menu if the eau de vie weren't so expensive.

 

This sounds really good to me -- if I could source the eau de vie.  If I may ask, why the switch from Noyaux to Amaretto?  I haven't had Amaretto in years but I seem to recall Amaretto was not among my favorites.

 

For myself, on this snowy night, a zombie.

 

 

Edit:  that's an awful, awful lot of orgeat for a small amount of not so strong spirits!  I think I'd start with 1/4 ounce.


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)

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Angostura Sour, adapted from the NY Times:

 

1.5 oz Angostura bitters

1 oz lime juice

0.75 oz demerara syrup

1 egg white

 

IMG_1832_1.jpg

 

Other than Manhattans, wine, and water, we drink more Angostura Sours than anything at home. The "Ango" is my partner's favorite drink and what she usually requests. I understand it's a variation on the Trinidad Sour, which, while a nice drink, lacks the monolithic yet expansive character of this version. Cool color too. People are always apprehensive of the amount of Angostura but the other ingredients really allow it to open up and show its complexity. It's a nice surprise.

 

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1013714-angostura-sour

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