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JoNorvelleWalker

Drinks! 2014 (Part 2)

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I picked up a bottle of the Giffard Pamplemousse and did a slight riff on a Brown Derby:

 

2 oz Rittenhouse

.75 oz Pamplemousse

.5 oz lime

.25oz 1:1 honey syrup

 

Shake, strain, coupe.

 

This is close, it pops a little more than a Brown Derby usually does. I'd like more of the honey flavor without the sweetness, but I'm not quite sure how to do that at the moment. Maybe a teaspoon more honey, a little less Pamplemousse and the addition of a grapefruit twist and/or grapefruit bitters at the end would keep the balance.

 

The Pamplemousse itself is pretty nice, sweet with just enough acidity, and they nailed the grapefruit aroma. I'd like to experiment mixing it with Becherovka or Hiver Amer to create an alcoholic Donn's mix of sorts.

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Maybe consider a honey liqueur like Bärenjäger?


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Señor Rafa dared me, so fuck it.

 

I had a much-fêted special release barrel strength Willet bourbon today. I did not care for it a bit. Bourbon remains an inferior spirit - give me decent rye, scotch, tequila, mezcal, brandy, RUM any day over "decent" bourbon. Not to say I haven't had good bourbon but man is it some overrated shit.

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Tonight I suffered a senior moment.  Somehow I misplaced my bottle of PF 1840.  It was not in the freezer.  It was not in the bathroom.  It was not with the recycling.  No matter, fortunately I keep a spare.

 

1 oz PF 1840

1 oz Blume Marillen

1/4 oz Tempus Fugit noyaux (naturally colored, of course)

1/2 oz orgeat

3/4 oz lemon juice

 

 

This unnamed beverage previously posted by Rafa is a flower bomb -- and I mean that in a good way.  But I reduced the orgeat from 3/4 oz, and unintentionally I forgot the Angostura entirely.  Duh.

 

Good thing I have four bottles of Blume Marillen to experiment.

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I just settled on Apricot Fix for the name.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Tonight before my mai tai I compared Tempus Fugit crème de noyauz, Luxardo amaretto, and Combier liqueur abricot, with an eye toward use in Rafa's new creation.

 

The noyaux and abricot are lovely.  Different, but lovely.  The amaretto not so much.  To my palate it tastes coarse.  Reminiscent of sweetened almond extract.  I either need to find an application for a bottle of amaretto, or have it join the pimento dram somewhere in a deep dark place.

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I either need to find an application for a bottle of amaretto, or have it join the pimento dram somewhere in a deep dark place.

You could do worse than making some Existential Heroes with your amaretto. Should be able to squeeze 152 of them out of your bottle. 

For the pimento dram, I'd prescribe the Dead Man's Mule

I think you'd like both; I definitely do!

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Playing around some more with the apricot fix:

 

2 oz PF 1840

1 oz Blume Marillen

1/4 oz Tempus Fugit noyaux

1/2 oz orgeat

1 oz lemon juice

1 dash Angostura

 

 

Garnish a spent half lemon.  Still a flower bomb.  But less sweet and more to my taste.  I shall of course continue to experiment.

 

 

Edit:  I'm not sure the Angostura helps here.  More research is needed.


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)

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Unnamed Sazerac variation (Poirezerac sounds like a dodgy European cop show):

 

2 oz Poire Williams, Etienne Brana

.125 oz walnut liqueur, Evan's mysterious friend

2 dashes cardamon bitters, Scrappy's

1 dash Angostura bitters

simple

 

Stirred. Chilled rocks glass. Herbsaint rinse. Lemon twist squished, squashed and squizzled over glass and then discarded. The walnut liqueur doesn't seem to be adding much to the whole experience. I think I'll lose it next time. I don't think I'd lose much. Might also try, say, .25 oz Cognac (or genever, of all things--seriously) and 1.75 oz Poire Williams. Maybe. Although I kind of like the assertiveness of an unaged spirit. 

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Chris Taylor

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Tonight I substituted abricot for the noyaux:

 

2 oz PF 1840

1 oz Blume Marillen

1/4 oz Combier abricot

1/2 oz orgeat

1 oz lemon juice

1 dash Angostura

 

 

Garnish again a spent half lemon.  Very nice full fresh fruit but without the depth of the noyaux -- not to mention missing the color of the little bugs.  So I poured a splash of noyaux on top.  Wow, the sum is greater than the parts!

 

Still reserving judgment on the Angostura.

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Being in the mood for lemon and orgeat:  an autumn in Jersey -- to which I added a little amaretto.  Which I hoped might go well with Laird's.  It does, but the amaretto over powers the apple notes.  Not a waste by any means, but not one of my better ideas.

 

Perhaps if the amaretto were applied by drops?  Might be able to work some pimento dram in here too!

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An after dinner glass of Whistlepig, which is better and better each time I sample it.  Besides, this way I don't have to brush my teeth.

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MZoBm5Nl.jpg

 

My recent, pitiful first attempt at a flaming lime shell, for a Cradle of Life. Too residually juicy to get very good pyrotechnics going. Had I seen FrogPrincesse's photo before making it, I would have known that inside-out shells could've solved that problem. 

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Captain Morgan (a leftover from my more ignorant bar-stocking days) and Plantation 3 Stars (from a more enlightened time). 

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Just made it and you're right, it's good! Thanks for the suggestion. I'll get through this damn 1.75l yet!

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Tonight I substituted abricot for the noyaux:

 

2 oz PF 1840

1 oz Blume Marillen

1/4 oz Combier abricot

1/2 oz orgeat

1 oz lemon juice

1 dash Angostura

 

 

Garnish again a spent half lemon.  Very nice full fresh fruit but without the depth of the noyaux -- not to mention missing the color of the little bugs.  So I poured a splash of noyaux on top.  Wow, the sum is greater than the parts!

 

Still reserving judgment on the Angostura.

 

2 oz PF 1840

1 oz Blume Marillen

1/4 oz Combier abricot

1/4 oz Tempus Fugit noyaux

1/2 oz orgeat

1 1/2 oz lemon juice

 

 

Well, this wasn't quite the best.  Maybe the Angostura is more important than I thought.  I dumped various more stuff in.  Pretty good now, but not a valid data point as I doubt I could recreate it.

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You're decreasing the ratio of Cognac to apricot vs. my original (2:1 vs my 3:1), so if decreasing the floral flavor while upping the proof was your goal I would recommend something like 2.5 oz Cognac to .5 apricot. As far as decreasing the sweetness of the orgeat/noyaux, I put it on crushed ice and added Ango for a reason, and I welcome reading the results of your experiments with ratios.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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