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Deus Mortus

Ribs in the oven

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Please. Are you talking about pork ribs or beef ribs. I found the word 'pork' several times in this thread, but never the word 'beef'.

My cooking of spare ribs...and they must have been beef...goes back a long time and never since the early 70s. Can someone give me some thoughts to go on. I'd like to cook some ribs, but DH says he didn't find any beef, just pork the other day.

Thanks.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Well Darienne, you have raised a very interesting point.

Beef ribs done low and slow are sometimes called 'Dinosaur Bones'

http://www.dinosaurbarbque.com/

they are difficult to find, as it either goes into the 'prime rib - bone on' or gets cut up into two kinds of beef ribs:

flanken (european: across the ribs) or american down the ribs and then cooked.

but if you can find beef ribs, and can remove the inner membrane and cook 'low and slow' they are very

different than pork ribs.

all ribs might be cooked low and slow: lamb, pig, goat etc.

I have the book from the

http://www.dinosaurbarbque.com/ and its very interesting. 'Good Old USA top of the line Road Food'

good luck !

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In Kansas and Texas the beef ribs preferred for slow cooking are called beef back ribs. They are often overlooked at the meat counter but are very good and usually not expensive. They are the bones that come off a rib eye roast. Look for the meatiest ones you can find.

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Thanks Norm and Rotuts for your answers. I haven't begun to learn much about meat yet. We were vegetarians for about 30 years and now are Lessmeatarians (Mark Bittman).


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Lessmeatarians makes a great deal of sense.

'Eat food. Not too much. Mostly vegetables'

Michael Pollan "Food Rules" ' an eaters manual ' in paperback, Penguin.

Once one understands this, the meat one eats will be extraordinary.


Edited by rotuts (log)

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Darienne- If you ever get into Oshawa Halendas Meats carries beef chuck ribs, which are even better than regular beef ribs in my opinion because they have about a 1.5 to 2 in thick layer of meat attached . We actually buy them at their outlet at the St Jacobs farmers market in Waterloo.

As to oven ribs, my Dad used to do oven roasted pork ribs . It was just simply seasoned well with S+P and rosemary then roasted in the oven uncovered for a short time at fairly high heat in a single layer. . then covered with foil, heat turned down til they were cooked thru and tender. Just his straight up simple italian spin on things. very good with oven roast potatoes alongside them.

Edit.. just to clarify that the ribs were on a rack while cooking to let fat drain off .


Edited by Ashen (log)

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Again my thanks to all for the advice and information.

I'll look up that meat store in Oshawa for our next trip west.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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My father used to experiment with all different methods of making ribs in the oven--in a rack over a pan of water, tented, in water, covered pan, foil wrapped, etc.--finished under the broiler usually.

I usually do a dry rub overnight and either stovetop smoke in the wok, or bake at a low temperature wrapped in parchment and finish under the broiler with some homemade BBQ sauce that uses mainly butter, Worchestershire sauce, garlic, paprika, cayenne, and a little liquid smoke (if I don't do the stovetop smoking) and this and that, depending on what I'm after.

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Here in Atlanta, we can usually find beef back ribs in slabs or cut into individual pieces. I find the latter inexplicable, but they must be popular, as they're often easier to find than the slabs.

Structurally, they're almost identical to (pork) baby backs, just bigger.

I heat the oven to 350°F, salt and pepper the ribs (or sometimes use a dry rub, depending on my mood, timing and the rest of the menu). The ribs go in, and I turn the oven down to 225°F. I flip them every 30 to 45 minutes, though I'm not sure it makes a difference. Somewhere around 2-1/2 hours, the meat starts to draw back from the end of the bones and the rack becomes very flexible.

If I'm going to glaze them, this is when I do it. The low temperature dehydrates the glaze without danger of burning, and you get a lovely, sticky mess.

When the meat has pulled back nearly an inch -- this will take another 15 minutes or so -- they're done.

they are difficult to find, as it either goes into the 'prime rib - bone on' or gets cut up into two kinds of beef ribs:

flanken (european: across the ribs) or american down the ribs and then cooked.

good luck !

I think flanken are not back ribs but short ribs, which come from the chuck.


Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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I used to work in a supper club 20 years ago and learned a wonderful way to make ribs in the oven. I have done it with pork and beef ribs and have also changed the flavorings as well.

For BBQ style ribs you take your ribs and season them with what ever rub you like. You then put them in a pan which you add some rough chopped onion and garlic. You then cover them with BBQ sauce of your choice and enough water to cover. Typically enough water will be to rinse out the BBQ sauce bottle. Put them in the oven and cook until you get to your desired level of doneness. I like my ribs with a little chew left to them, while others prefer the fall off the bone level. Let the pan cool with the ribs staying in the liquid overnight. The next day you can peel the fat off and remove the ribs. Now all you need to do is either rewarm them under a broiler or on a grill to give them some color and put on a finishing sauce of your choice. I like to take the de-fatted braising liquid and reduce it and then use that as a base for the sauce. When I am lazy I will just use fresh BBQ sauce.

I have done variations on this with lemon and white wine, Asian red cooked style, Korean style, etc....

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what I meant to say is that USA ribs if not on the Prime Rib are cut into 'short ribs'

the key to remember on beef ribs is as they come from a larger animal that was probably 'grain finished' they have a lot of fat on them.

They are usually braised, and the fat removed, but now days, for those who can, SV works very very well.

no other way to get a rare (131) short rib thats fork tender.

The meat on the ribs is the intercostal muscle, of which there are two 'strands' if you will: it works for a livings and is close to a lot of fat = exceptional flavor if 'treated right.'

Best of Happy Cooking!

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I used to work in a supper club 20 years ago and learned a wonderful way to make ribs in the oven. I have done it with pork and beef ribs and have also changed the flavorings as well.

For BBQ style ribs you take your ribs and season them with what ever rub you like. You then put them in a pan which you add some rough chopped onion and garlic. You then cover them with BBQ sauce of your choice and enough water to cover. Typically enough water will be to rinse out the BBQ sauce bottle. Put them in the oven and cook until you get to your desired level of doneness. I like my ribs with a little chew left to them, while others prefer the fall off the bone level. Let the pan cool with the ribs staying in the liquid overnight. The next day you can peel the fat off and remove the ribs. Now all you need to do is either rewarm them under a broiler or on a grill to give them some color and put on a finishing sauce of your choice. I like to take the de-fatted braising liquid and reduce it and then use that as a base for the sauce. When I am lazy I will just use fresh BBQ sauce.

I have done variations on this with lemon and white wine, Asian red cooked style, Korean style, etc....

This sounds like a good way into an unknown subject area. Thanks.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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what I meant to say is that USA ribs if not on the Prime Rib are cut into 'short ribs'

the key to remember on beef ribs is as they come from a larger animal that was probably 'grain finished' they have a lot of fat on them.

They are usually braised, and the fat removed, but now days, for those who can, SV works very very well.

no other way to get a rare (131) short rib thats fork tender.

The meat on the ribs is the intercostal muscle, of which there are two 'strands' if you will: it works for a livings and is close to a lot of fat = exceptional flavor if 'treated right.'

Best of Happy Cooking!

This is misleading. Beef back ribs -- the ones attached to the rib roast (or a bone-in rib steak) come from the rib primal. Short ribs almost always come from the chuck primal, though occasionally a short rib cut will impinge on the rib area (you'll know this is happening when you see the price jump; butchers won't give up expensive rib meat for chuck prices). Although both primals are mainly cut from the rib cage, they deal with different and differently used muscles.

For more information, refer to one of the charts here: Virtual Weber Bullet. The "Angus Beef Chart (2007)" is accurate for the US. Check out the Australian version and you'll see that what the Aussies call short ribs are not what Americans are referring to, though sometimes you'll see ribs like this in "real" US butcher shops -- but in neither case are they part of the rib roast cut.


Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Our pork ribs in the oven:

For one rack of ribs, marinate overnight in mixture of:

2 c apple cider

1/2 c bottled Teriyaki sauce

1/4 c brown sugar

Bake ribs slowly in 250 degree oven, basting frequently.

I usually take them out of the oven when they are fork tender, but NOT "fall off the bone" mushy, which I hate.

And then finish them outside on the grill or in the smoker.

But I have lived places where the outside finish was impossible. So I just ran them under the broiler until the skin got nice and crispy.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Your are limited by your imagination :biggrin: The Korean BBQ style comes out really really good. Gochujang, ginger, black pepper, garlic, salt and sugar in rub , and good Korean BBQ sauce sauce for braise and glaze. It is so good. After I tried it, I felt dumb for not doing it sooner.

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It was too cool to fire up the smoker.

These spareribs were slathered with liquid smoke, covered with rub and roasted @250* convection for 4 hours. The pans were relined with fresh foil, sauce was applied and returned to the oven for 5 minutes, applied sauce again and took them out 5 minutes later.

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