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Marshmallow sandwich cookies


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I am making marshmallow sandwich cookies with a shortbread layer on the bottom. I am dipping them in tempered chocolate. Does anyone have a recipe for the shortbread layer? I need something that does not crack easily when cut so that the cookies are even and the dipping chocolate does not get contaminated with too many crumbs. And should I pour the marshmallow layer onto the cookie layer or make them separately and then "glue" them together with chocolate?

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I've had them made by someone else and I found that the cookie went soft from the moisture in the marshmallow. I would definitely put a layer of chocolate between the two.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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This sounds like fun and delicious. Confectionery partner Barbara and I are still pondering what to do this Wednesday. This might be it. Orange marshmallow I think. Dark chocolate. I'll watch this thread for a shortbread solution. Or maybe Margarita flavored marshmallows... (current obsession, Margarita ingredients together) :hmmm:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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What's on Wednesday?

Actually, Wednesday is National (USA) Pie/Pi Day. But it's also the day we are going to make something delicious in the confectionery arena. We meet at least once a month, but now we haven't done anything since...let's see...early November what with our being away and Barbara having to move two daughters in two different cities and March break and my right hip and so on and so on.

Sorry about that. National Ice Cream Day is the third Sunday in July and National Lollipops Day is July 20th...

Omigosh, March 14 is National White Day in Japan and some other Oriental countries and gifts include marshmallows (white). Who knew? :wub:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I did put a chocolate layer in between the last time I made them and that helped preserve the crunchiness of the cookie. And the cookie really made the whole thing absolutely delicious. But the shortbread I made (I made 3 different recipes) broke apart when I cut the slabs and crumbled so much that it was really difficult to dip them. I guess I could use that dipping chocolate for some kind of bark rather than wasting it. I also made the shortbread too thick in one recipe so it was almost half cookie and half marshmallow. There has to be a good recipe out there for the right kind of cookie layer.

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Perhaps roll and cut the shortbread before you bake it. It bakes nicely strong and the edges dont crumb much.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Perhaps roll and cut the shortbread before you bake it. It bakes nicely strong and the edges dont crumb much.

Do you mean as in roll the shortbread into a pan and cut it in the pan before baking it? Then it would rise upwards? I am not what anyone would call a seasoned cookie maker.

DL has a chocolate cookie which I've made to make ice cream sandwiches. Maybe it would work under marshmallows?? The recipe calls for cutting cookie rounds, but I just rolled it across a half-sheet and scored the dough into rectangles. It made perfect rectangles and it didn't rise too much. It's all an experiment to me.

I love short-bread cookies beyond belief but can't see the purpose of using them with marshmallows and chocolate. Perhaps I am missing something here??

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I made something similar to this and used the Korova/World Peace cookies - which I guess are like shortbread, kinda.

In australia we have a commercial biscuit called a Chocolate Royal which is a cookie base with a marshmallow (and usually a little jam in between) and then the whole thing enrobed in chocolate. I made my version with the chocolate cookie base, then peppermint marshmallow and dark chocolate coating.

ETA : I found they did get a bit too soft - the ones that I coated entirely in chocolate fared better than the ones with the base exposed, but from memory the contact point between marshmallow and cookie (I didn't put chocolate between them) always ended up a bit soft).

Edited by stuartlikesstrudel (log)
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I meant roll them like sugar cookies, on a board, then cut them, and bake them.

If you just want squares or rectangles, roll them or pat them in the pan and yes, cut before baking.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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In australia we have a commercial biscuit called a Chocolate Royal which is a cookie base with a marshmallow (and usually a little jam in between) and then the whole thing enrobed in chocolate. I made my version with the chocolate cookie base, then peppermint marshmallow and dark chocolate coating.

Thanks for sending me back to my own childhood. Whippets they were called, made by Viau Montreal. So luscious. And of course we had a perfectly revolting way of eating them too. Cookie base, jam, marshmallow and the entire dunked in chocolate.

Here's Wikipedia's page on the confection. Great fun!

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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That might be the answer--to cut them BEFORE baking them. then I would need to cut the marshmallows the same size and glue each to the cookie with marshmallow. I will try that and let you know. sounds labor intensive.

As for Kouign, you ARE missing something! Once you try these, you will see why I am determined to make them. There is the softness and sweetness of the marshmallow against the butteriness of the shortbread, and the crispness of the dark tempered chocolate. I am hoping they will sell well--if I don't eat them all first!

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Yup - cut the cookies before baking, then make marshmallow - put it in a piping bag and when it has cooled just the right amount - pipe it on top of the cookie. The Curley book has a couple of these in it - one with a shortbread cookie base.

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It wasnt me that questioned. I rarely question anything that's butter-based.

I hope you'll post pix before and after chocolate.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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