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maggiethecat

Desperation Desserts

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I can't believe it hasn't been mentioned (I might have missed it) but Nutella is your friend here. Banana toast with Nutella or, a personal favourite, heat some Nutella until it is runny and mix in salted/roasted macadamias. Eat and repeat.

Actually, it's been mentioned in five posts (#s 20, 47, 52, 54, 55). Ctrl-F (assuming a PC) also is your friend.

I second the banana bread toast w/Nutella (or, as I mentioned earlier, pb + Nutella).

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When I make s'mores indoors I layer the chocolate on the Graham cracker, top with the marshmallow and broil the whole thing in the toaster oven, then top with the other Graham cracker. And in the last two days I have made the pots de creme and bananas foster. Delicious. Not helping the diet, but, delicious nonetheless. :)

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So devilishly simple. Bananas Foster as party trick.

Bananas Foster used to be my "go to" dessert for large dinner parties, and by large, I mean up to 80. Sometimes I would have the entire dinner in my home, but sometimes, I would volunteer for just the dessert portion of a large progressive dinner.

The recipes as written are all very generous in so far as how much sauce they make per person. I'd figure on having enough sauce for 4-6 people with the standard recipe that is supposed to serve two.

The day before, I'd spoon a couple of scoops of vanilla ice cream into short, fat, on-the-rocks glasses that I had bought at a restaurant supply house just for this dessert. After spooning the vanilla ice cream into the glasses, I stacked them on trays in my freezer. I bought a very large copper chafing dish so that I could make this at the table while my many admirers ( :biggrin: ) gathered 'round. I pre-measured everything and had it at the ready, so I wouldn't have to do anything but grab and pour the rum and creme de banana. I actually had saved several empty bottles of varying sizes so that I could pre-measure the alcohol and have it sitting there, but still have it in the attractively-labeled original bottles. I had the butter and the brown sugar measured and in the chafing dish, and piled the bananas on a copper tray alongside. The whole arrangement looked really wonderful, and portended great things to come.

Then, while everybody stood around and oohed and aahed, I'd make the sauce, flaming it almost to the ceiling.

At those large dinner parties, somebody always offers to help, so as soon as someone offered, I'd ask them to retrieve the glasses with the ice cream from the freezer.

It went like clockwork. I'd ladle a little sauce into each glass and my impromptu helpers would stick a spoon into the glass, add a cocktail napkin, and then pass them around to the guests.

Oftentimes, I'd also have some of those Pepperidge Farm rolled cookies at the ready, and I'd stick a cookie into each glass as well.

I had done it often enough that I was practically on autopilot, but it always seemed so special and festive.

I heartily recommend it to anyone that would like a fun and easy and spectacular and delicious dessert to make for large, or small, crowds.

I honestly think "party trick" describes it perfectly.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

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Had forgotten about those.

I do mine a bit differently. Butter & sugar both sides. Cinnamon too if you like. A long piece of chocolate at the bottom of the roll-up procedure. Into the oven 375 degrees for a few minutes.

Yummm :wub: :wub:

If you add some sliced banana and a few marshmallows, things get real fun. :)

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Here's a few more suggestions:

1. Rice pudding. I've found a formula of (roughly) 2 parts coconut milk to 3 parts rice to 4 parts water gives a nice texture, sweetened to taste. Simmer the diluted coconut water (you don't get much coconut flavor) until the sugar dissolves with some orange zest, maybe add some cloves, allspice, and nutmeg, add the rice, and cook until the rice is done absorbing the water. IF you have the wrong kind of rice, just add tapioca starch.

2. Tea-poached pears. Basically, just put enough brewed black tea (earl grey is nice) in a saucepan to cover some peeled pears, add sugar, and simmer for 30 minutes. Then crank up the heat, boil like crazy, pull the pears when the water no longer covers them or they get soft, and then continue to reduce until you get a nice sauce. Thicken with tapioca starch. (I love this stuff!)

3. Tarte l'alsace can be made very quickly - it's possible in a bit over an hour start to finish. Sadly, I'm not very good at it. Yet.

4. You can make a fairly simple custard using milk, sour cream, sugar, vanilla, and eggs. Bake it in an oven until the top gets golden. Eat. Takes less than five minutes of actual work.

5. I can eat an entire bowl of italian merengue.


Edited by jrshaul (log)

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Here's a few more suggestions:

1. Rice pudding. I've found a formula of (roughly) 2 parts coconut milk to 3 parts rice to 4 parts water gives a nice texture, sweetened to taste. Simmer the diluted coconut water (you don't get much coconut flavor) until the sugar dissolves with some orange zest, maybe add some cloves, allspice, and nutmeg, add the rice, and cook until the rice is done absorbing the water. IF you have the wrong kind of rice, just add tapioca starch.

Are the "parts" by volume or weight? What are the right and wrong kinds of rice? I'd like to try this one. Probably add cardamom. And some nuts. DH would eat nuts in an omelet I think.

Our current 'go-to' dessert is an open faced apple tart, courtesy of Mark Bittman, the Minimalist. Any kind of fruit pretty much would do I think. Whipped up pretty quickly. So far, only apple, and with old-age cheddar (we're Canadians). :smile:

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I love rice pudding and my husband hates it, so it it qualifies as a terrific candidate for a late night desperation dessert. The time frame, not so much. So I thought hmmmmm, maybe a microwaved rice pudding? Sigh, I did some checking and it appears that making rice pud in the micro takes forty-five minutes.

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I love rice pudding and my husband hates it, so it it qualifies as a terrific candidate for a late night desperation dessert. The time frame, not so much. So I thought hmmmmm, maybe a microwaved rice pudding? Sigh, I did some checking and it appears that making rice pud in the micro takes forty-five minutes.

That's why I cook large batches of rice in my rice cooker, freeze the "extras" in 1 cup portions because the rice defrosts quickly and a pudding can be produced in just a few minutes. (I make the kind with egg custard.)

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I love rice pudding and my husband hates it, so it it qualifies as a terrific candidate for a late night desperation dessert. The time frame, not so much. So I thought hmmmmm, maybe a microwaved rice pudding? Sigh, I did some checking and it appears that making rice pud in the micro takes forty-five minutes.

Actual "rice pudding" it ain't, but even when I was a little girl, and then for my own children, and now my grandchildren, having steamed white rice for dinner means a delicious treat afterwards.

We put about a half-cup or so of the cooked rice into a coffee mug, add a pat of butter, a spoonful of sugar, the merest pinch of salt, a dusting of cinnamon, raisins if you like them, maybe a drop of vanilla if you're in the mood, and a generous splash of heavy cream. Stir and heat in the microwave for about 30 seconds. Quick enough?

Like I said, it might not be the same sort of rice pudding one gets after a long cooking, but it's darn tasty. It sure satisfies my cravings for rice pudding in-between making the longer version, and definitely fills the bill for 'desperation dessert.' Especially since your DH doesn't like rice pudding, you should give this Instant Rice Pudding For One a try.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

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Thanks, Jaymes and Andi. Next time I make rice I'll plan for leftovers.

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Bananas Foster used to be my "go to" dessert for large dinner parties, and by large, I mean up to 80. Sometimes I would have the entire dinner in my home, but sometimes, I would volunteer for just the dessert portion of a large progressive dinner.

I am SOOOO impressed. :wub:

Well, golly, thanks. But seriously, there's absolutely nothing to it. Nothing whatsoever, but planning.

It's certainly nowhere nearly so difficult as the things that many folks on eGullet do routinely that require such knowledge and skill - turning out fine pastries, souffles, expertly roasting a juicy, moist, crispy-skinned chicken, etc. - even baking a perfect loaf of bread are all far more difficult.

Like I said, all that is required to turn out a flotilla of Bananas Foster is a little advance planning. And that, anyone can do. Maybe you should even consider giving it a go for your dog parties!

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I love rice pudding and my husband hates it, so it it qualifies as a terrific candidate for a late night desperation dessert. The time frame, not so much. So I thought hmmmmm, maybe a microwaved rice pudding? Sigh, I did some checking and it appears that making rice pud in the micro takes forty-five minutes.

Actual "rice pudding" it ain't, but even when I was a little girl, and then for my own children, and now my grandchildren, having steamed white rice for dinner means a delicious treat afterwards.

We put about a half-cup or so of the cooked rice into a coffee mug, add a pat of butter, a spoonful of sugar, the merest pinch of salt, a dusting of cinnamon, raisins if you like them, maybe a drop of vanilla if you're in the mood, and a generous splash of heavy cream. Stir and heat in the microwave for about 30 seconds. Quick enough?

Like I said, it might not be the same sort of rice pudding one gets after a long cooking, but it's darn tasty. It sure satisfies my cravings for rice pudding in-between making the longer version, and definitely fills the bill for 'desperation dessert.' Especially since your DH doesn't like rice pudding, you should give this Instant Rice Pudding For One a try.

Rice, butter, maple syrup and cream.

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Rice, butter, maple syrup and cream.

A little while ago, hankering for a bit of sweet, I defrosted some frozen rice, added some yogurt, ginger syrup and stirred in some dried cranberries. Sealed in a container and heated in microwave for 3 minutes, rested for 5 minutes.

Not bad...


Edited by andiesenji (log)

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Adding maple syrup (and I've got a jug of the really good stuff) sounds utterly sublime.

I think that, as Andie says, having cooked rice always at the ready is a huge advantage. I never thought of freezing it. I now can think of little else.

Must. Freeze. Rice.

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And some chopped nuts of your favorite kind.

I have a container of frozen rice in the freezer. Maybe for breakfast tomorrow. :wub:

Oh, and of course, we have maple syrup from our next door neighbors.


Edited by Darienne (log)

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Lunch today for DH and me: defrosted Jasmine rice with sour cream (bought by mistake instead of cottage cheese), citron syrup (from the candied Buddha's Hand I made in Moab, UT), and pecan pieces, sprinkled over with cinnamon & sugar (mixture made for tortilla roll-ups). Zapped in the microwave. Delicious. :wub: :wub:

Must cook and freeze some more rice. :raz:

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This thread has me hounding my own cupboards. This is the most recent:

Fry thin apple slices in butter until cooked through. Throw in a couple of chopped dates and a handful of walnuts.

Get this hot and then stir in a tablespoon of maple syrup.

Serve with or without a dollop of yogurt or ice cream, if you have it.

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This thread has me hounding my own cupboards. This is the most recent:

Fry thin apple slices in butter until cooked through. Throw in a couple of chopped dates and a handful of walnuts.

Get this hot and then stir in a tablespoon of maple syrup.

Serve with or without a dollop of yogurt or ice cream, if you have it.

That's brilliant, Linda, though I'm dateless and will swap in some dried apricots. I have everything else. Guess what I'll be doing about 11:00 CST?

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apple slices dipped in dulce de leche somehow worked their way into my week.

I'm thinking I could make a quick "caramel" in a couple minutes, when the ddl runs out: melt & burn sugar, add hot cream, dip fruit, eat.

(editted to add the all important caramelization step)


Edited by Kouign Aman (log)

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apple slices dipped in dulce de leche somehow worked their way into my week.

I'm thinking I could make a quick "caramel" in a couple minutes, when the ddl runs out:

Yes, or you could do what we do - always keep a couple of jars of Coronado Cajeta on hand.

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apple slices dipped in dulce de leche somehow worked their way into my week.

I'm thinking I could make a quick "caramel" in a couple minutes, when the ddl runs out:

Yes, or you could do what we do - always keep a couple of jars of Coronado Cajeta on hand.

That seems to be the brand most often seen in the local Mexican supermarkets, although they also have the Aldana brand in jars as well as individual containers and the Payoso brand - seems popular during holidays.

Vallarta also has their store brand in take home containers in the deli dept and for some reason, in the meat department. It's very good but doesn't have a long shelf life, even in the fridge, although it can be frozen.

Even Smuckers has Dulce de Leche in the ice cream topping section in my local Walmart - not in the Mexican food section.

Someone gave me a jar of Cinnamon Cajeta Caramel made by Peace Tree products. And I also had a jar from Fat Toad Farm - I don't recall opening it but can't find it during a cursory search in the small pantry...

A while back my Mexican neighbor mentioned that one of her children or grandchildren had come across a recipe for an ice cream made with cajeta and dark Mexican beer. We both thought it sounded weird, but apparently it was a hit at an ice cream festival.

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A while back my Mexican neighbor mentioned that one of her children or grandchildren had come across a recipe for an ice cream made with cajeta and dark Mexican beer. We both thought it sounded weird, but apparently it was a hit at an ice cream festival.

This actually sounds fabulous to me. I'll have to try it.

Earlier I had mentioned my own go-to quick sweet fix, but something else I still do sometimes is...sugar bread. When I was a kid, I would come home from school wanting a snack, and my grandmother would spread soft sweet butter on a slice of soft, somewhat sweet white bread (think Peppridge Farm)and sprinkle it all over with white sugar, tapping off the excess. This is so good.

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.....

Earlier I had mentioned my own go-to quick sweet fix, but something else I still do sometimes is...sugar bread. When I was a kid, I would come home from school wanting a snack, and my grandmother would spread soft sweet butter on a slice of soft, somewhat sweet white bread (think Peppridge Farm)and sprinkle it all over with white sugar, tapping off the excess. This is so good.

Oh my lord. This brings back memories. My Grandma did the same thing for me once rationing no longer restricted access to butter and sugar. The crunch of that sugar against the soft bread and butter was a combination surely made in heaven.

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apple slices dipped in dulce de leche somehow worked their way into my week.

I'm thinking I could make a quick "caramel" in a couple minutes, when the ddl runs out:

Yes, or you could do what we do - always keep a couple of jars of Coronado Cajeta on hand.

That seems to be the brand most often seen in the local Mexican supermarkets,

Yes. And it's just fine.

When in Mexico, I've certainly tried brands that I like better. And I had some dear friends that lived in Queretaro that came to visit and brought several jars of their favorites as a housegift. I particularly like the "envinada" varieties, which, of course, means some sort of wine or booze has been added.

I saved the empty jars for a time so that I could be certain to get more, but that obviously was a rather cumbersome and inefficient method of remembering something, so I made a note of the brand names and tossed the jars. And not too long afterward, lost the note.

But it didn't really matter, as I have a devil of a time finding anything but Coronado here in the US, which is true Mexican goat's milk cajeta, and which is pretty good.

So I've settled for Coronado.

I used to bring jars of cajeta back from my trips to Mexico, and I still go very often, but with the restrictions on what you can put in your carry-on, and my loathing of checked baggage, don't bother anymore.

So, like I said, I've settled.

And it's just fine.

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