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Cooking with the Momofuku Milk Bar Cookbook


thayes1c
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Just got my copy of the Milk Bar cookbook a couple days ago, seems we egulleteers have been slacking on creating a topic for this new book!

I just made up a batch of cereal milk (So rich! So delicious! Can't wait to try it in my coffee in the morning) and the dough for cornflake-chocolate chip-marshmallow cookies is chilling in the fridge(Corn flake crunch being a component for that recipe). I've eaten a bunch of the dough and am enjoying the salty sweet excess that it promises. Also, I'm having a really hard time sitting still and typing this. Time to run across the room! SUGAR RUSH!!!! YEEHAA!

Ahem. Lots of interesting techniques and ingredients I've never used before, probably because I very seldom make sweets. The milk powder is an interesting flavor boost and I'm also looking forward to trying some of the recipes with glucose. I've never used it before and it seems like an interesting goo. I picked it up at a Michael's craft store for half the price of Amazon, so if you're looking for glucose you might check craft stores yourself.

Anybody else cooking Tosi's creations at home?

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It's just powdered freeze dried corn. You have to make it yourself, grinding up the corn in a blender. I haven't been able to find freeze dried corn anywhere around town, so I think I'll have to order it off Amazon. It's included in the cereal milk White Russians, something I'm eager to try...

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I didn't even know this was coming out. I just happened upon it today at Barnes & Noble and bought it on a whim. I've made the Blueberries & Cream cookies and the Marshmallow cookies from internet recipes and they were amazing. I don't really bake but her flavors really resonate with me. I can't decide what to make first. I looked all over for glucose before and came up empty until finding it in Michael's when I wasn't even looking for it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I made the Corn Flake Marshmellow Choc Chip cookies this weekend.

The spread alot, and cooked really hard, almost crystal like. I didn't use bread flour, but that was the only variance from process best practices.

I was disappointed because I would have liked some chew as well, however, my wife and mother-in-law deemed them the best cookies they have ever eaten.

There is something oddly addictive about the crunch-salty-sweet of the corn flake crunch. And the batter was UNREAL. As if normal cookie dough isn't awesome, this took it to a new level.

Mike

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I've made the blueberries and cream cookies, the bagel bombs, and the cinnamon bun pie. The first two were awesome- highly recommend. The cinnamon bun pie did not turn out well AT ALL, and I'm not sure if it's a recipe problem or a me problem.

The dough used is the same as the bagel dough, with no adjustments made for sweetness, etc. The liquid cheesecake is not sweet, nor is the brown butter, beyond its light inherent sweetness. There is some brown sugar strewn on, along with the streusel, which has enough salt in it to basically cancel out any sweetness it might have provided. So it was basically a quick bread with some un-sweet versions of typically sweet things on top. Additionally, there was a huge amount that was just bread, with no topping at all. Just weird.

Anyone else try making this?

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I also got the "best cookie ever" from somebody when I made the flake-mallow-chip recipe. And that was also with the cookies coming out really hard and crystalline. I think that 18 minutes is just too long. I've since made the chocolate brownie cookies (my favorite) and the peanut butter cookies and I think 15 to 16 minutes is probably better for the fudgy centers that the book talks about.

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Glad to see that confirmation O-WK... I'd already adjusted the recipe to 14 - 15 min @ 350 in my head after reading others experiences but hadn't tested it yet.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Me, now, I'm thinking to put in dark chocolate nuggets to cut down on the sweetness of the cookie. To me it, the original recipe, was like eating melted sugar.

So far, my experience with the "Milk" cookbook, it's been overkill.. too much of some thing. Tried the Bagel Bombs dough from the book, and it was too wet based on the gram.

Edited by Obese-Wan Kenobi (log)
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Don't have the cookbook - but was just looking at the recipe for the blueberry cream cookies online and noticed the requirement to refrigerate for at least 24 hours. That's not something I've ever had the patience for! Anyone else recall discussion of vacuum sealing cookie dough to get the same effect as aging it?

Thinking it might be in Ideas in Food - the search begins!

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I've only tried 4 recipes.

Cereal Milk - Good

CM Panacotta - the 3/4 tsp. powdered gelatin recommended was insufficient. I followed that and it was a flop. I then used 1 tsp. and that worked well.

Cereal Crunch - Good. She does not give a time, but 15 minutes at 300F yields a chewy crunch, like a granola bar.

Mother Dough - Can't figure this out so far... I've done with the recommendations and have come up with too wet dough. Slurpy. Had to add more flour. To make a "wet ball" as the book states. It was about 90-150 grams off.

That's it so far, aside from the cookies that i mentioned above.

No disrespect. It's a pleasure working with these unique recipes :)

Thanks.!

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Don't have the cookbook - but was just looking at the recipe for the blueberry cream cookies online and noticed the requirement to refrigerate for at least 24 hours. That's not something I've ever had the patience for! Anyone else recall discussion of vacuum sealing cookie dough to get the same effect as aging it?

Some of the cooks at work will vacuum seal freshly mixed pasta dough instead of letting it rest for an extended period. But with cookie dough, wouldn't that either ruin all the creamed in tiny air bubbles, or make a huge mess, again because of tiny air bubbles? I once tried vacuum sealing meringue buttercream, which balooned hugely, making me think that vacuums and foams were a bad combo.

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  • 2 months later...

I made the birthday cake. I thought it was really good. DH described the frosting as "elevated grocery store frosting" which is exactly the intent of this cake. It had that American buttercream taste, but a smooth texture and wasn't sickly sweet. I didn't use clear vanilla so I tinted the frosting a bit. My crumb also didn't really "crumb" but that was totally my fault for not following directions.

gallery_8693_309_893915.jpg

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I've made the birthday cake as well and it received rave reviews. I used the birthday frosting on a chocolate stout cake as well to rave reviews. It does have that magical grocery store taste, and my girlfriend declared that it was her new favorite frosting and she would accept no other cake for her birthdays henceforth. The clear imitation frosting is pretty inexpensive and you can buy it at Michael's. I think it really adds that delicious artificial note. The chocolate malt cake is really good, too, the burnt marshmallows are delicious and a lot of fun to make. Marshmallows + blow torch= 30 seconds of awesome in the kitchen.

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I'm happy with the delicious real vanilla taste :laugh: I was actually at Michael's today with that on my list, and thought, what am I doing? The frosting as I made it was great. I think the compost cookies are up next. I have a friend bringing dinner tomorrow.

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I think they did on the top, maybe not so much between the layers. I managed to eat half of it by itself before I finished the rest of the cake, so I'd definitely recommend making it. :/

Edited by Marmish (log)
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