• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Eman57

What do you put on your pancakes?

40 posts in this topic

Warm cajeta.

Fruit on the side.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maple syrup for regular griddle cakes. Often over crumbled crisp bacon, no butter.

Sorghum molasses mashed into soft butter for buckwheat or corn griddle cakes.

For the thinner "Swedish" pancakes or similar (not quite crepes), currant jelly, strawberry jam, etc.

For oven pancakes - Dutch Baby - puffy types, apple compote with cinnamon and sometimes mixed berry compote.

For "flannel cakes" it has to be apple butter or pumpkin butter topped with toasted pecans.

I'm with you completely, though with childhood memories of Swedish pancakes for dinner I would add lingonberry jam. It used to be hard to find, but now I can buy it at Ikea.

One question: flannel cakes. I've never heard of them. What are they?



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sprinkle them generously with sugar, then add some fresh lemon juice, using a butter knife to distribute everything evenly. Heaven. Try it. You could go with orange juice too, just make sure it's fresh squeezed.


---------------------------------------

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One question: flannel cakes. I've never heard of them. What are they?

There are several versions of "Flannel" cakes, some are made without leavening and are not as thin as a crepe, not as thick as a griddle cake or flapjack. This is the type served at Musso & Frank Grill in Hollywood.

At one time IHOP served this type.

The thicker version I grew up with was made with oatmeal - I really don't have a recipe, it is one that I have made for so long that I just throw it together.

A recipe that is essentially identical to mine is here.

I was once told that the term "flannel" is derived from the Welsh and means a flattened cake baked on a "bakestone." But I've never been able to find an exact definition or source.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Welsh lady I know makes Welshcakes

{pice ar y maen }every first of march to celebrate St. David's Day . The recipe is pretty cool, and they are baked on a bakestone. I will ask her if she knows the term flannelcake.


"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being in Northern New England, real maple syrup is pretty much required.

More specifically, I usually do grade B, with an extra sprinkle of maple sugar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting how everyone here seems to use grade B maple syrup on their pancakes. I was always under the impression that grade A was intended for condiment usage, while grade B was for use as an ingredient, so the maple flavour would come through stronger.

That said, I use Canada No. 2 ("Amber") maple syrup on most things, and Canada No. 3 ("Dark") for some baked goods. So I'm no different from the rest of you! What is the Light and Extra Light stuff good for, anyway?


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the Grade A stuff as well, but generally prefer the stronger flavor of Grade B. And actually, my favorite stuff at the moment is "ungraded" stuff from early this season: it was too dark to be classified Grade B, but unlike the Grade C end of season stuff, it was actually good. (I own maple trees, that's where much of my syrup comes from, although my neighbor is the one with the sap boiler)

I should also specify that I really prefer Northeast US maple over most of the Canadian stuff, not for regional snobbery, but due to the US stuff being thicker (higher specific gravity). Most of the easily available Canadian stuff is watery. I like my syrup, well, syrupy.


Edited by kaszeta (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting how everyone here seems to use grade B maple syrup on their pancakes. I was always under the impression that grade A was intended for condiment usage, while grade B was for use as an ingredient, so the maple flavour would come through stronger.

That said, I use Canada No. 2 ("Amber") maple syrup on most things, and Canada No. 3 ("Dark") for some baked goods. So I'm no different from the rest of you! What is the Light and Extra Light stuff good for, anyway?

Quite likely you're right that "grade A was intended for condiment usage, while grade B was for use as an ingredient." I know a great many folks that I'll refer to as "non-foodies" (for want of a better word) that prefer the more refined, less-intense maple flavor.

But for me, I want it as "maplely" as I can get it. I love maple and, just in general, prefer strong flavors. At first, I also was somewhat surprised to see that just about everybody here prefers B over A, like I do. But when I think about it, it does seem logical for eG'ers to make that choice.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gobs of butter, a generous slather of strawberry jam and lots of real maple syrup. I rarely eat pancakes, but when I have the rare craving, I like lotsa SWEET.

For crepes, I do it up similar to Christine: a ladle of melted butter, a squeeze of lemon juice and sugar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Butter and pure maple syrup, which is so nice with the bacon, sausage, or ham. But when I was little I often had jam, or sugar, or all three.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know some folks that put chocolate syrup on their pancakes and waffles. And a big dollop of whipped cream.

Not for me. Despite the fact that I love chocolate, that doesn't even sound good. But my friend says that it actually tastes a lot like a chocolate-filled doughnut. Course I don't like those much either. So I guess there's something for everyone.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daughter had a friend over to spend the night. I fixed pancakes for breakfast. The guest

piled up several pancakes in a bowl after sprinkling sugar on each of them. She than

poured milk over them and ate them as if they were cereal. She said that's the way her

family has always eaten them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regular pancakes: butter and real maple syrup, or butter and sprinkled brown sugar.

Thin or eggy pancakes: butter, powdered sugar and fresh lemon juice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

homemade strawberry/Gran Marnier sauce, or lots of butter w powdered sugar

dutchbabies - lemon and powdered sugar

I make the same sauce w Three Red Fruit preserves, it's so easy and delish!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By ltjazz
      Hey all,
       
      I've made thicker and creamier sorbets with 25% to 35% sugar strained fruit purees and sugar, syrups, and other stabilizers that have worked well. However, because it's so much fruit and little to no water it can be an expensive project.
       
      I am trying to make "Water Ice" or "Italian Ice" in my home ice cream machine. Think of textures similar to Rita's Water Ice, Court Pastry Shop, or Miko's in Chicago. It eats much lighter than a sorbet but isn't really icy, but it's also not thick like sorbet. Ritas uses "flavoring" and sugar, while the other two use fruit juice. I'm thinking of thinning the strained fruit juice with water and adding a stabilizer, but I'm having trouble getting this in my home ice cream machine without it freezing solid like granita.
       
      Can anyone suggest a way to use real fruit juice, water, and a combination and concentration of stabilizers to get a looser, frozen fruit dessert that isn't icy?
    • By Lam
      So I've been looking for the ultimate matcha brownies (technically blondies but it just doesn't have the same ring to it). I've made chewy and fudgy regular brownies, but I find white chocolate based blondies to be much trickier. I have made a few matcha brownie recipes in the past, but they all came out sad and cakey. So I have taken it upon myself to come up with my own recipe. My matcha brownies came out very moist and "fudgy" but not chewy. I'm thinking next time I should try using vegetable oil instead of butter and only dark brown sugar. 


    • By Mette
      I've searched high and low for a recipe for lemon mousse, firm enough to make little 'eggs' to go on a dessert plate. Ideally, it should not be based on lemon curd or lemon cream, but just plain old lemons.
      Also, please throw me the best chocolate mousse recipe EVER - I'm in a mousse phase....
      Thanks in advance.
    • By B Edulis
      Once again, I tried to recreate my mother's shortbread cookies, using her recipe, and they didn't turn out. They were so crumbly they fell apart when you picked them up. I'm very attached to this particular recipe -- she told me that she got it from the first boy who ever kissed her, whose Scottish mother was renowned for them. That's one way to get a recipe!) She made them at all holidays. Here the recipe:
      1 cup of butter
      1/2 cup of sugar
      2 cups of flour
      pinch salt
      I've been creaming the butter and suger and adding the flour, chilling it and rolling it out and baking them at about 300 degrees. They spread more than hers did and they're just way crumbly. The taste is good, though.
      I wish I could as her for advice, but she's no longer with us -- can anyone help me?
    • By maui420
      last night was my first attempt at a blueberry coffecake. it came out awesome but i felt that the topping part could be better. basicall, from the top of my head, it was 1 cup of brown sugar, 2/3 c flour, 1/2 cup of small diced up butter, and some cinnamon.
      the topping came out ok but seemed a little "grainy" like sandy and didnt have that crumbly bubbly style top.
      suggestions? thanks. will post pics next time.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.