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Eman57

What do you put on your pancakes?

40 posts in this topic

Warm cajeta.

Fruit on the side.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Maple syrup for regular griddle cakes. Often over crumbled crisp bacon, no butter.

Sorghum molasses mashed into soft butter for buckwheat or corn griddle cakes.

For the thinner "Swedish" pancakes or similar (not quite crepes), currant jelly, strawberry jam, etc.

For oven pancakes - Dutch Baby - puffy types, apple compote with cinnamon and sometimes mixed berry compote.

For "flannel cakes" it has to be apple butter or pumpkin butter topped with toasted pecans.

I'm with you completely, though with childhood memories of Swedish pancakes for dinner I would add lingonberry jam. It used to be hard to find, but now I can buy it at Ikea.

One question: flannel cakes. I've never heard of them. What are they?



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I sprinkle them generously with sugar, then add some fresh lemon juice, using a butter knife to distribute everything evenly. Heaven. Try it. You could go with orange juice too, just make sure it's fresh squeezed.


---------------------------------------

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One question: flannel cakes. I've never heard of them. What are they?

There are several versions of "Flannel" cakes, some are made without leavening and are not as thin as a crepe, not as thick as a griddle cake or flapjack. This is the type served at Musso & Frank Grill in Hollywood.

At one time IHOP served this type.

The thicker version I grew up with was made with oatmeal - I really don't have a recipe, it is one that I have made for so long that I just throw it together.

A recipe that is essentially identical to mine is here.

I was once told that the term "flannel" is derived from the Welsh and means a flattened cake baked on a "bakestone." But I've never been able to find an exact definition or source.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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A Welsh lady I know makes Welshcakes

{pice ar y maen }every first of march to celebrate St. David's Day . The recipe is pretty cool, and they are baked on a bakestone. I will ask her if she knows the term flannelcake.


"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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Being in Northern New England, real maple syrup is pretty much required.

More specifically, I usually do grade B, with an extra sprinkle of maple sugar.

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Interesting how everyone here seems to use grade B maple syrup on their pancakes. I was always under the impression that grade A was intended for condiment usage, while grade B was for use as an ingredient, so the maple flavour would come through stronger.

That said, I use Canada No. 2 ("Amber") maple syrup on most things, and Canada No. 3 ("Dark") for some baked goods. So I'm no different from the rest of you! What is the Light and Extra Light stuff good for, anyway?


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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I like the Grade A stuff as well, but generally prefer the stronger flavor of Grade B. And actually, my favorite stuff at the moment is "ungraded" stuff from early this season: it was too dark to be classified Grade B, but unlike the Grade C end of season stuff, it was actually good. (I own maple trees, that's where much of my syrup comes from, although my neighbor is the one with the sap boiler)

I should also specify that I really prefer Northeast US maple over most of the Canadian stuff, not for regional snobbery, but due to the US stuff being thicker (higher specific gravity). Most of the easily available Canadian stuff is watery. I like my syrup, well, syrupy.


Edited by kaszeta (log)

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Interesting how everyone here seems to use grade B maple syrup on their pancakes. I was always under the impression that grade A was intended for condiment usage, while grade B was for use as an ingredient, so the maple flavour would come through stronger.

That said, I use Canada No. 2 ("Amber") maple syrup on most things, and Canada No. 3 ("Dark") for some baked goods. So I'm no different from the rest of you! What is the Light and Extra Light stuff good for, anyway?

Quite likely you're right that "grade A was intended for condiment usage, while grade B was for use as an ingredient." I know a great many folks that I'll refer to as "non-foodies" (for want of a better word) that prefer the more refined, less-intense maple flavor.

But for me, I want it as "maplely" as I can get it. I love maple and, just in general, prefer strong flavors. At first, I also was somewhat surprised to see that just about everybody here prefers B over A, like I do. But when I think about it, it does seem logical for eG'ers to make that choice.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Gobs of butter, a generous slather of strawberry jam and lots of real maple syrup. I rarely eat pancakes, but when I have the rare craving, I like lotsa SWEET.

For crepes, I do it up similar to Christine: a ladle of melted butter, a squeeze of lemon juice and sugar.

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Butter and pure maple syrup, which is so nice with the bacon, sausage, or ham. But when I was little I often had jam, or sugar, or all three.

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I know some folks that put chocolate syrup on their pancakes and waffles. And a big dollop of whipped cream.

Not for me. Despite the fact that I love chocolate, that doesn't even sound good. But my friend says that it actually tastes a lot like a chocolate-filled doughnut. Course I don't like those much either. So I guess there's something for everyone.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Daughter had a friend over to spend the night. I fixed pancakes for breakfast. The guest

piled up several pancakes in a bowl after sprinkling sugar on each of them. She than

poured milk over them and ate them as if they were cereal. She said that's the way her

family has always eaten them.

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Regular pancakes: butter and real maple syrup, or butter and sprinkled brown sugar.

Thin or eggy pancakes: butter, powdered sugar and fresh lemon juice.

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homemade strawberry/Gran Marnier sauce, or lots of butter w powdered sugar

dutchbabies - lemon and powdered sugar

I make the same sauce w Three Red Fruit preserves, it's so easy and delish!

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