Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

nakji

Small Batch Pickled Vegetables

Recommended Posts

My husband and I really like to eat pickled vegetables, especially as a pre-dinner snack with a glass of beer or a bit of whatever the local tipple happens to be. I don't have a lot of space in my flat to keep canned pickles on hand - although I wish I did. So I've gotten in the habit of making quick pickles that last a week or so in the fridge; I like to search out recipes that make one or two bottles of something that I can have on hand for just such occasions. Sometimes I make fermented pickles like kimchi, but mostly I rely on brine or vinegar quick pickles.

I made two today - one of my favourite recipes makes a small batch, although they're not particularly quick - is from Marcella Hazan's Italian Kitchen book. They're thinly sliced eggplants layered with salt, garlic, chili, and mint. Then you weight them and turn them upside down for 12 hours, then you vinegar them and do the same again for another twelve hours, then you cover the lot with olive oil and keep them in the fridge. Whenever I give them to anyone, they go crazy for them. They're really excellent on a sandwich as well.

photo(2).jpg

I also made a small batch - around 200g of pickled onions - these are in a vinegar solution flavoured with a cinnamon stick and a red chili. I'm looking forward to trying these with cheese. The recipe is from "The Korean Table".

photo.jpg

And last week I made a batch of hot pickled cauliflower with garlic and red chilis. The recipe was from "Everyday Harumi", and used vinegar. Instead of salt, however, the recipe uses chicken boullion powder. I'd post a picture of these, but we ate them so fast, they didn't stand a chance.

Anyone else like making small batch pickled vegetables?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From another thread...I usually have a small batch of pickles going on...

A fresh dill cucumber pickle on the left, (1:2 vinegar to water) and a green and yellow wax bean giardiniera experiment on the right. I blanched the beans on the right for 3 minutes, and they're in about a 2:1 vinegar to water ratio.

gallery_6902_4791_28887.jpg


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some excellent suggestions for pickling vegetables in David Chang's Momofuku cookbook.

Currently I have pickled Daikon and pickled Cucumbers in my fridge. I also had some fresh walnuts and made pickled walnuts at the same time. The walnuts were most recently used in a Fish Vera Cruz recipe to give both crunch and acid to the dish.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How timely that this thread should pop up today as I'm getting ready to make my first batch of sweet n- spicy cucumber chips this afternoon. God, I love those things! And yesterday I bought a whole head of cauliflower so I'll probably pickle some of that, too. I'm *always* up for new sweet and spicy brine recipes so I'd sure love it if anyone had a few favorites to share. And I really do like things spicy, spicy!


Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How timely that this thread should pop up today as I'm getting ready to make my first batch of sweet n- spicy cucumber chips this afternoon. God, I love those things! And yesterday I bought a whole head of cauliflower so I'll probably pickle some of that, too. I'm *always* up for new sweet and spicy brine recipes so I'd sure love it if anyone had a few favorites to share. And I really do like things spicy, spicy!

Then I must share Harumi's recipe:

Take one head of cauliflower and break into smallish florets. It should yield around two cups. Heat 45 ml of oil (sunflower or similar) in a frypan and saute four or five fat cloves that have been thinly sliced. When it has turned golden and is fragrant, add your cauliflower and two roughly chopped red chilies to the pan - I used small red Chinese chilis. Harumi says to seed the chilies, but if you like it hot, leave them in if you don't mind how it looks. Note - this isn't a sweet pickle, but it's addictively sour.

You should saute the cauliflower quickly on a high heat. I did mine in a wok until the edges of the florets were crispy, the florets were still firm - about 2 minutes.

Then add 1 tablespoon of chicken stock granules, 100 ml of rice vinegar, and one teaspoon of good soy sauce. Toss it about and serve. These are even better overnight, but our batch didn't last any longer than that.

2010 05 23 023_edited-1.jpg

From another thread...I usually have a small batch of pickles going on...

A fresh dill cucumber pickle on the left, (1:2 vinegar to water) and a green and yellow wax bean giardiniera experiment on the right. I blanched the beans on the right for 3 minutes, and they're in about a 2:1 vinegar to water ratio.

I wonder if small-batch pickles are getting more popular? Or do people who pickle still mostly can everything? I'd love to be able to can, but I don't have the space.

Currently I have pickled Daikon and pickled Cucumbers in my fridge.

How do you do your daikon - I often do mine Korean style - salted and sugared, then drained and sprinkled with chili powder, but it doesn't really keep. It's more of a salad. I'd love a recipe for pickled daikon cubes of the kind that come with Korean fried chicken.

ETA photo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too like pickles for appetizers. I adore the versatile Mexican pickled onion--Rick Bayless's recipe in Authentic Mexican is good--which are a terrific garnish for almost anything; I keep them on hand. My favorite quick pickle is olive oil pickles, recipe here, that I have made for, oh, 30 years. I love them straight from the freezer. My grandmother used to make a quick pickle with cucumber, lemon, and sugar that was very nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently I have pickled Daikon and pickled Cucumbers in my fridge.

How do you do your daikon - I often do mine Korean style - salted and sugared, then drained and sprinkled with chili powder, but it doesn't really keep. It's more of a salad. I'd love a recipe for pickled daikon cubes of the kind that come with Korean fried chicken.

Hi Erin,

I bought myself a Benriner turning vegetable slicer and use it to slice the Daikon into a fine circular julienne.

The marinade is simple: combine 240g water, 120g vinegar, 75g sugar, 10g salt until solids are dissolved. Pour over Daikon in container to cover. Mature for around a week before eating. It will keep as long as other opened pickles in your refrigerator.

Checking my refrigerator, I also pickled some finely sliced fennel at the same time.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic reminds me that I've been meaning to pull out my copy of Quick Pickles by Chris Schlesinger. When I first bought it a few years ago, I made pickles at least once a week, but haven't made any in ages. I recall a great recipe for beets and one for carrots that I liked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic reminds me that I've been meaning to pull out my copy of Quick Pickles by Chris Schlesinger. When I first bought it a few years ago, I made pickles at least once a week, but haven't made any in ages. I recall a great recipe for beets and one for carrots that I liked.

That's my standard go-to for the quick pickles.

About the daikon. Does it always have a unique odor when it's pickled?


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does it always have a unique odor when it's pickled?

Oh, it smells a little like, uh, farts, yeah? Never figured out how to get around that.

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

And that's precisely why I have give up on daikon - the smell of my 'fridge is more than I can stand so it is something I enjoy elsewhere!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Timely post indeed. I picked up the loveliest Napa cabbage I've ever seen from my CSA. Bright leafy green, less white and frizzled than the standard variety you see at the grocery store. I've made some fresh salads with it, braised some with beans and I still have another head. I want to make a kimchi as I already have the Korean chili paste I think I will need. Does anyone have a go-to kimchi recipe they'd share?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does it always have a unique odor when it's pickled?

Oh, it smells a little like, uh, farts, yeah? Never figured out how to get around that.

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

And that's precisely why I have give up on daikon - the smell of my 'fridge is more than I can stand so it is something I enjoy elsewhere!

I always had a simple Vietnamese water pickle of carrot and daikon and my son would make a similar comment when I opened the jar. The good thing was that keeping it in a tightly closed glass jar resulted in NO fridge odor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I always had a simple Vietnamese water pickle of carrot and daikon and my son would make a similar comment when I opened the jar. The good thing was that keeping it in a tightly closed glass jar resulted in NO fridge odor.

That's a very good tip. Did you use that pickle on banh mi?

Timely post indeed. I picked up the loveliest Napa cabbage I've ever seen from my CSA. Bright leafy green, less white and frizzled than the standard variety you see at the grocery store. I've made some fresh salads with it, braised some with beans and I still have another head. I want to make a kimchi as I already have the Korean chili paste I think I will need. Does anyone have a go-to kimchi recipe they'd share?

Cabbage kimchi is one thing I usually don't make at home, but I really enjoy making mul kimchi out of fresh napa. We have some discussion in our "Making Kimchi at Home" topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My grandmother used to make a quick pickle with cucumber, lemon, and sugar that was very nice.

Did she use lemon juice or lemon zest, or both?

Just lemon juice, but zest would be nice too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just lemon juice, but zest would be nice too.

One pickle I really enjoyed in Japan was daikon sticks pickled with yuzu zest, which is what made me think of it. What was her method to use the lemon juice - in place of or in addition to vinegar?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes- used the Vietnamese water pickle of daikon and carrot on bahn mi, but more often just in lettuce wraps of grilled meats. I would offer the recipe but the book is in storage. The basics are daikon on the mandoline and carrot curled off the vegetable peeler (use big fat carrots). The brine was about 1/2 and 1/2 white vinegar and water with a bit of salt & sugar. The main thing I have learned in terms of quick pickle longevity is to be quite careful to use a clean utensil in the jars. It can be tempting to go back for another bit with a fork or chopstick that has been elsewhere, without even realizing. With a "clean" jar these things can go weeks even.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nakji, those raw eggplant pickles sound good. I ordered the book from the library yesterday. I've never made pickled anything, so am following this discussion with interest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just lemon juice, but zest would be nice too.

One pickle I really enjoyed in Japan was daikon sticks pickled with yuzu zest, which is what made me think of it. What was her method to use the lemon juice - in place of or in addition to vinegar?

I had to look yuzu up--sounds very nice, a little like jicama with lime, of which I am fond. My grandmother used lemon juice only, I think; I was small. If there was vinegar as well, it would have been apple cider vinegar, but my memory is lemon only.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nakji, those raw eggplant pickles sound good. I ordered the book from the library yesterday. I've never made pickled anything, so am following this discussion with interest.

I think you'll enjoy that whole, book, not just for the pickles! Check out our topic on cooking with it.

I pulled an eggplant out of the jar today to check, and it was perfectly done. Now all I need to do is get some other antipasto ingredients lined up for a proper plate.

I had to look yuzu up--sounds very nice, a little like jicama with lime, of which I am fond. My grandmother used lemon juice only, I think; I was small. If there was vinegar as well, it would have been apple cider vinegar, but my memory is lemon only.

Jicama with lime! How exotic sounding. There's something very nice about the combination of crisp and tart.

I have eaten all the onions in my small-batch onion jar, and am dealing with some cucumbers from my CSA bag. I'm wondering if I can re-use some or all of the vinegar from the onions with some new cucumbers. Does anyone else ever do that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have eaten all the onions in my small-batch onion jar, and am dealing with some cucumbers from my CSA bag. I'm wondering if I can re-use some or all of the vinegar from the onions with some new cucumbers. Does anyone else ever do that?

I make Danish cucumber pickles and will often re-use the pickling liquid (sugar and vinegar). I strain it, boil it up for 5 minutes to kill any nasties, add a little more sugar and vinegar and voila! I have never had a problem doing this.


Edited by heidih fix quote tags (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last weekend I made a great Vietnamese quick pickle as a relish for my "banh mi burger" attempt. Really simple, really nice.

4 cups of bean sprouts

1 grated carrot

1/2 red onion, sliced thinly

1 handful cilantro leaves and stems

1 red chili, thinly sliced

Tossed together in a bowl.

In a saucepan:

3/4 cup rice vinegar

3/4 cup water

1 tbsp. salt

The original recipe called for 2 tbsp. of sugar; I goofed and added 3/4 cup, because the number was in my head. Turned out nice for a burger relish, but sweet. Obvious 2 tbsp. will yield a more sour pickle.

Bring these to boil until the sugar and salt dissolves, then cool. Pour over the vegetables and let them sit for an hour; drain, then serve. I reserved the liquid and put the salad mix back into and into the fridge for another week post original use, and it was fine. The bean sprouts go kind of long and skinny, but it's still delicious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic reminds me that I've been meaning to pull out my copy of Quick Pickles by Chris Schlesinger. When I first bought it a few years ago, I made pickles at least once a week, but haven't made any in ages. I recall a great recipe for beets and one for carrots that I liked.

Thanks for this book recommendation JAZ. Kerry Beal managed to source me a copy and here's my first batch of quick pickles. On the left are Bread and Butter Pickles and on the right "Back Eddy" Pickles. I hope to delve further into this book in the weeks ahead.

quick pickles.jpg


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By markovitch
      A while ago, to learn the ins and outs of Horseradish, I began making my own mustard. I have managed some really really good varieties, (one with black mustard seeds, rice-wine vinegar, horseradish and Kabocha squash) and some really god awful ones too. I recall that my grandmother used to make her own ketchup too. it wasn't all that good.
      has anyone made their own condiments before?
      care to share experiences?
    • By Lisa Shock
      The basic formula for these cakes was developed by the wife of a mayonnaise salesman in an effort to help him out. I did a bit of research, and have found many variations. Early variants generally involve using less cocoa, which I cannot recommend. Later variants involve using cold water instead of boiling, adding salt, and additional leaveners. I personally do not feel that any additional salt is needed, as mayonnaise and that famous, tangy brand of salad dressing (sometimes the label just says 'Dressing') both contain a fair amount of salt. If you are using homemade mayonnaise or a low sodium product, an eighth teaspoon of salt may boost the flavor a bit. And, of course, somewhere along the way fans who prefer a certain salad dressing over mayonnaise started using it to make this cake. Nowadays, the Hellman's website has a different formula -one with added eggs and baking powder. I have not tried this newer formulation.
       
      Some versions of this recipe specify sifted cake flour. This will result in a very light cake with virtually no structural integrity, due to the paucity of eggs in this recipe compared to a regular cake. Cupcakes made this way give beautifully light results. However, every time I try to make a traditional 8" double layer cake with cake flour, I experience collapse. I recommend AP flour or at least a mix of cake and pastry flour.
       
      I have never made this with a gluten-free flour replacer. This recipe does not have very much structural integrity and as such does not make a good candidate for a gluten-free cake.
       
      I have made this cake many times, the type of sandwich spread you choose will affect the outcome. Made with mayonnaise, the cake has a good chocolate flavor and moistness. Made with that famous, tangy, off-white salad dressing that gets used as a sandwich spread, the cake has a subtle bit of extra brightness to the flavor. If one chooses to use a vegan mayonnaise, the result is tasty but lacking a little in structure; I would bake this in a square pan and frost and serve from the pan.
       
      The cocoa you use will also affect the flavor.  For a classic, homey flavor use a supermarket brand of cocoa. To add a little sophistication, use better, artisan type cocoa and use chocolate extract instead of the vanilla extract.
       
      Supposedly, the traditional frosting for this cake should have a caramel flavor. Look for one where you actually caramelize some sugar first. Modern recipes for the icing seem like weak imitations to me; using brown sugar as the main flavor instead of true caramel.
       
      Chocolate Mayonnaise or Salad Dressing Cake
      makes enough for two 8" round pans, or a 9" square (about 7 cups of batter)
       
      2 ounces/56g unsweetened, non-alkalized cocoa
      1 cup/236g boiling water
      1 teaspoon/4g regular strength vanilla extract
      3/4 cup/162g mayonnaise, vegan mayonnaise, or salad dressing (the tangy, off-white, sandwich spread type dressing)
      10.5ounces/300g all-purpose flour
      7 ounces/200g sugar
      0.35ounce/10g baking soda
       
      Preheat your oven to 350°.
      Grease or spray two 8" round pans or an equivalent volume square or rectangle.
      Place the cocoa in a medium (4-5 cup) bowl. Add the hot water and stir with a fork to break up any clumps. Allow to cool down a little,  then add the vanilla extract and the mayonnaise or salad dressing spread. Beat well to eliminate lumps. In the bowl of an electric mixer or larger regular bowl if making by hand, sift in the flour and add the sugar and baking soda. Mix the dry ingredients to distribute evenly. Slowly beat in the cocoa mixture. Mix until the batter has an even color. Pour immediately into the pans. If making two 8" rounds, weigh them to ensure they contain equal amounts.
      Bake for approximately 20 minutes, or until the center of the top springs back when touched lightly. (The toothpick test does NOT work well on this moist cake!) Allow the cake to cool a little and shrink from the sides of the pan before removing. Removal is easier while still a little warm.
      Good with or without frosting.
      Good beginner cake for kids to make.
       
       
       
    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
    • By sartoric
      I make this a lot. Traditionally served with dosa, but great with all kinds of Indian food, even just scooped up with bread or pappads for a snack. Although it's slightly different every time, depending on the tomatoes and chillies used, plus the strength of the tamarind, it's easy, quick to make and always delicious.
       
      In a blender - half a medium red onion chopped, 7 dried red chillies broken up a bit, 2 ripe tomatoes chopped, 1 tsp of sea salt, 3 tsp tamarind paste.

       
      Whizz until purée like about 2 minutes.

       
      In a sauté pan over medium heat add 60 ml sesame oil (gingelly), when it's hot but not smoking add 1 tsp black mustard seeds.   

       
      Quickly cover the pan to prevent escape and sizzle for a minute.

       
      Add 1 tsp of urad dal (black lentils, skinned and split they are light grey).

       
      Fry until golden, another minute or so.

       
      Throw in about 20 curry leaves. These splatter so cover the pan again. 

       
      Lower the heat and add the  blender contents.

       
      Simmer, stirring frequently for about 10 minutes, until you get a runny jam consistency.
       
      Ta da !

    • By HoneyMustard
      Pennstation's Honey Mustard taste so good, but they don't sell it in stores like Big Boy Frisch's sells their tartar sauce.

      I am assuming they buy it in bulk from a certain name brand. Does anyone know what that brand is or at least a similar Honey Mustard recipe?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...